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-   -   AG: Aunt Granny's Advice, or How to become an elderly cyclist: (http://www.cyclebanter.com/showthread.php?t=245154)

John B. Slocomb January 30th 15 01:32 AM

AG: Winter Hills
 
On Thu, 29 Jan 2015 08:26:44 -0500, Duane
wrote:

On 29/01/2015 6:54 AM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Wed, 28 Jan 2015 20:25:45 -0400, Joy Beeson
wrote:

On Wed, 28 Jan 2015 08:25:48 -0500, dgk wrote:

Or move to Florida. No hills, no winter. There is wind though.

And deep, deep sand.

Or there was in the late fifties.


I was there in the early 1950's and they had made sort of wide paths
with a black looking stuff that were pretty smooth and kept you from
sinking in the sand :-)


Until the wind blows the sand from the beach over those paths.


I don't remember any strong winds. An occasional hurricane certainly
and there was a period where we had fairly strong Westerlies that
carried some very large mosquitoes from the Everglades into the big
city (I measured one while she was having lunch and she measured 1/2"
length, over all), and of course the Palmetto Bugs, but no sand storms
that I remember.
--
Cheers,

John B.

Duane[_3_] January 30th 15 03:25 PM

AG: Winter Hills
 
On 29/01/2015 7:32 PM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Thu, 29 Jan 2015 08:26:44 -0500, Duane
wrote:

On 29/01/2015 6:54 AM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Wed, 28 Jan 2015 20:25:45 -0400, Joy Beeson
wrote:

On Wed, 28 Jan 2015 08:25:48 -0500, dgk wrote:

Or move to Florida. No hills, no winter. There is wind though.

And deep, deep sand.

Or there was in the late fifties.

I was there in the early 1950's and they had made sort of wide paths
with a black looking stuff that were pretty smooth and kept you from
sinking in the sand :-)


Until the wind blows the sand from the beach over those paths.


I don't remember any strong winds. An occasional hurricane certainly
and there was a period where we had fairly strong Westerlies that
carried some very large mosquitoes from the Everglades into the big
city (I measured one while she was having lunch and she measured 1/2"
length, over all), and of course the Palmetto Bugs, but no sand storms
that I remember.



I guess it depends on where you are in FLA. The wind off the gulf along
the panhandle can be pretty intense.

1/2" mosquito? Hell, in Louisiana standards that would be a baby. But
thanks for reminding me what the locals call flying cock roaches. I
always assumed the name Palmetto Bug was invented so as to now frighten
tourists.

John B. Slocomb January 31st 15 02:44 AM

AG: Winter Hills
 
On Fri, 30 Jan 2015 09:25:18 -0500, Duane
wrote:

On 29/01/2015 7:32 PM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Thu, 29 Jan 2015 08:26:44 -0500, Duane
wrote:

On 29/01/2015 6:54 AM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Wed, 28 Jan 2015 20:25:45 -0400, Joy Beeson
wrote:

On Wed, 28 Jan 2015 08:25:48 -0500, dgk wrote:

Or move to Florida. No hills, no winter. There is wind though.

And deep, deep sand.

Or there was in the late fifties.

I was there in the early 1950's and they had made sort of wide paths
with a black looking stuff that were pretty smooth and kept you from
sinking in the sand :-)


Until the wind blows the sand from the beach over those paths.


I don't remember any strong winds. An occasional hurricane certainly
and there was a period where we had fairly strong Westerlies that
carried some very large mosquitoes from the Everglades into the big
city (I measured one while she was having lunch and she measured 1/2"
length, over all), and of course the Palmetto Bugs, but no sand storms
that I remember.



I guess it depends on where you are in FLA. The wind off the gulf along
the panhandle can be pretty intense.

1/2" mosquito? Hell, in Louisiana standards that would be a baby. But
thanks for reminding me what the locals call flying cock roaches. I
always assumed the name Palmetto Bug was invented so as to now frighten
tourists.



Off the Gulf? My god man, Miami is, well was, the only civilized place
in Florida. Once call "the Jewish Riviera" :-)
--
Cheers,

John B.

Joy Beeson January 31st 15 05:04 AM

AG: Winter Hills
 
On Fri, 30 Jan 2015 09:25:18 -0500, Duane
wrote:

I
always assumed the name Palmetto Bug was invented so as to now frighten
tourists.


If I recall correctly -- bear in mind that I was only twelve at the
time -- palmetto bugs and cockroaches were different creatures. The
difference was, I was told, that you can kill a palmetto bug. Roaches
run faster.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net



John B. Slocomb January 31st 15 12:10 PM

AG: Winter Hills
 
On Sat, 31 Jan 2015 00:04:21 -0400, Joy Beeson
wrote:

On Fri, 30 Jan 2015 09:25:18 -0500, Duane
wrote:

I
always assumed the name Palmetto Bug was invented so as to now frighten
tourists.


If I recall correctly -- bear in mind that I was only twelve at the
time -- palmetto bugs and cockroaches were different creatures. The
difference was, I was told, that you can kill a palmetto bug. Roaches
run faster.


I have no idea whether you are correct but I can certainly verify that
every Floridian I ever talked to insisted that palmetto bugs WERE NOT
cockroaches :-)

I, on the other hand. used to argue that if it looked like a duck, and
quacked like a duck ....
--
Cheers,

John B.

Joy Beeson February 1st 15 07:43 PM

AG: Thumb test
 

Before every ride, test your tires by putting all four fingers under
the rim and pressing down on the tread with your thumb. You should
also perform this test before and after inflating your tires, to check
whether the air you have been pumping actually went into the tire --
and to calibrate your thumb.

There have been a couple of times that I've wished that I were in the
habit of performing the thumb test after each rest stop.

--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://joybeeson.home.comcast.net/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.


Duane[_3_] February 2nd 15 02:33 PM

AG: Winter Hills
 
On 30/01/2015 8:44 PM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Fri, 30 Jan 2015 09:25:18 -0500, Duane
wrote:

On 29/01/2015 7:32 PM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Thu, 29 Jan 2015 08:26:44 -0500, Duane
wrote:

On 29/01/2015 6:54 AM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Wed, 28 Jan 2015 20:25:45 -0400, Joy Beeson
wrote:

On Wed, 28 Jan 2015 08:25:48 -0500, dgk wrote:

Or move to Florida. No hills, no winter. There is wind though.

And deep, deep sand.

Or there was in the late fifties.

I was there in the early 1950's and they had made sort of wide paths
with a black looking stuff that were pretty smooth and kept you from
sinking in the sand :-)


Until the wind blows the sand from the beach over those paths.

I don't remember any strong winds. An occasional hurricane certainly
and there was a period where we had fairly strong Westerlies that
carried some very large mosquitoes from the Everglades into the big
city (I measured one while she was having lunch and she measured 1/2"
length, over all), and of course the Palmetto Bugs, but no sand storms
that I remember.



I guess it depends on where you are in FLA. The wind off the gulf along
the panhandle can be pretty intense.

1/2" mosquito? Hell, in Louisiana standards that would be a baby. But
thanks for reminding me what the locals call flying cock roaches. I
always assumed the name Palmetto Bug was invented so as to now frighten
tourists.



Off the Gulf? My god man, Miami is, well was, the only civilized place
in Florida. Once call "the Jewish Riviera" :-)



Well we were talking about FLA, not just Miami. Haven't ridden my bike
in Miami but I remember being behind a guy in a Lincoln at a red light
and when the light cycled he didn't move. I got out to see what was up
and thought he was dead but turns out he was just napping.

I have ridden on the east coast around Daytona and on the gulf coast and
blowing sand was a possibility in both of those places.

Duane[_3_] February 2nd 15 02:36 PM

AG: Winter Hills
 
On 31/01/2015 6:10 AM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Sat, 31 Jan 2015 00:04:21 -0400, Joy Beeson
wrote:

On Fri, 30 Jan 2015 09:25:18 -0500, Duane
wrote:

I
always assumed the name Palmetto Bug was invented so as to now frighten
tourists.


If I recall correctly -- bear in mind that I was only twelve at the
time -- palmetto bugs and cockroaches were different creatures. The
difference was, I was told, that you can kill a palmetto bug. Roaches
run faster.


I have no idea whether you are correct but I can certainly verify that
every Floridian I ever talked to insisted that palmetto bugs WERE NOT
cockroaches :-)

I, on the other hand. used to argue that if it looked like a duck, and
quacked like a duck ....


Maybe it's a New Orleans thing but Palemetto bugs are cock roaches that
fly and bite.

But then again, maybe not. According to Orkin:

http://www.orkin.com/cockroaches/dif...-palmetto-bug/



Duane[_3_] February 2nd 15 02:38 PM

AG: Thumb test
 
On 01/02/2015 1:43 PM, Joy Beeson wrote:

Before every ride, test your tires by putting all four fingers under
the rim and pressing down on the tread with your thumb. You should
also perform this test before and after inflating your tires, to check
whether the air you have been pumping actually went into the tire --
and to calibrate your thumb.

There have been a couple of times that I've wished that I were in the
habit of performing the thumb test after each rest stop.



It's a good trait to be able to test your tires with your fingers.
Comes in handy when filling with CO2 cartridges on the road.

Joy Beeson February 8th 15 05:25 AM

AG: Skills
 

You learn skills so that you can ride; you don't ride to show off your
skills. Don't use a hard-won skill just because you spent a lot of
time learning it.

Negotiating your way into the left-turn lane and going with the flow
of traffic is the quickest, easiest, and safest way to make a left
turn most of the time, but in any vehicle there are times when it's
better to make three right turns instead. On many occasions, I've
turned right into a deserted side street, made a U turn, and crossed
with the light. Or I'll turn into a not-so-deserted side street and
turn around in a parking lot or driveway. And it isn't unknown to
ride straight through, get off the bike, walk back to the
intersection, and push the pedestrian-crossing button.

Selecting the best technique for the situation at hand is, perhaps,
the hardest-won skill of all.

--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://joybeeson.home.comcast.net/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.



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