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-   -   AG: Aunt Granny's Advice, or How to become an elderly cyclist: (http://www.cyclebanter.com/showthread.php?t=245154)

Frank Krygowski[_4_] May 10th 16 04:17 PM

AG: Snacks
 
On 5/9/2016 10:37 PM, Joy Beeson wrote:

Just looked up "pierogi" on Wikipedia.


Ah, sounds like you've lived a life of sad deprivation!


--
- Frank Krygowski

Joy Beeson May 15th 16 02:42 AM

AG: Snacks: part two
 

I got the idea for this post when I bought a box of apple-raisin
pastry crisps, and thought that they might be good with cream cheese
the way I used to eat BelVita crackers.

BelVita was a tasty "breakfast biscuit" -- might still be, for all I
know -- that was really a very dry, brittle cracker. Dry isn't good
along the road, and when you're hungry and don't have a plate to hold
under your chin, a cracker that sprays crumbs in all directions isn't
satisfying. So I spread the flat side of a biscuit with a little
cream cheese, pressed the flat side of another biscuit onto the cream
cheese, and put the sandwich into a snack bag. By lunch time, it had
sogged up just right: still crunchy, but no longer hard and brittle,
and extra butterfat is always welcome.

One reminiscence led to another: I used to stuff pitted dates with
almonds: just the right combination of sugar and fat to fuel a bike
ride. Any nut would do, but almonds were easiest to get inside the
dates. This led to an experiment: dried apricots also have a pocket
that can be filled with nuts. Pity I no longer need the calories.

I'll bet pitted prunes could also be stuffed, but I think I like them
better straight.

How many years has it been since I could buy little Stanley prunes
fresh from the tree every fall? Those were very good, and almost as
concentrated as dried prunes. I marked my trail with plum pits in
those days.

--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.



Joy Beeson May 22nd 16 04:40 AM

AG: Cleaning bottles
 

18 May 2016

I washed two bike bottles today. I usually just rinse the bottle and
run water through the valve each time I fill it, but with the bad back
and the sprained arm, the bottles sat around long enough to develop a
decidedly off flavor. Well, one did -- I didn't taste the other one.

I didn't think boiling water would be good for the plastic, so I put
dishwater in the bottles, shook them well, squirted some of the water
through the valves, and set the bottles aside until the other dishes
were done. Then I emptied them, poured a little bleach in one, put my
finger on the valve and shook it, squirted the bleach through the
valve into the other bottle, shook it, and squirted the bleach onto a
plastic cutting board. (The board had already had quite a lot of very
hot water run over it while I rinsed the dishes, but the germ-hiding
scratches on plastic cutting boards can always use a little extra
sanitizing.

Then I let the bleach work on the bottles while I scrubbed the cutting
board and a stained white skillet, then rinsed the bottles and their
lids and valves thoroughly with hot tap water.

And when I emptied the drainer a few hours later, I put the bottles
into the freezer. I don't think I'll be using them any time soon.

But I just stood up, put my hands on the desk, and transferred a great
deal of my weight to my arms and it didn't hurt. Holding my arm in
one unalterable position on the flatfoot *does* hurt. But there's
still getting on and getting off, and the possibility of needing to
take evasive action.

At least I can still walk as far as I want to.


21 May 2016

Rode the Fuji to the fairgrounds today, carrying the bottle that
didn't go green. The bleached bottles are still in the freezer.


--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.


John B.[_6_] May 22nd 16 08:08 AM

AG: Cleaning bottles
 
On Sun, 22 May 2016 00:40:52 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:


18 May 2016

I washed two bike bottles today. I usually just rinse the bottle and
run water through the valve each time I fill it, but with the bad back
and the sprained arm, the bottles sat around long enough to develop a
decidedly off flavor. Well, one did -- I didn't taste the other one.


At my house if I set the empty bottles near the sink they turn up
later clean and stacked with the other "bike bottles" :-)

I didn't think boiling water would be good for the plastic, so I put
dishwater in the bottles, shook them well, squirted some of the water
through the valves, and set the bottles aside until the other dishes
were done. Then I emptied them, poured a little bleach in one, put my
finger on the valve and shook it, squirted the bleach through the
valve into the other bottle, shook it, and squirted the bleach onto a
plastic cutting board. (The board had already had quite a lot of very
hot water run over it while I rinsed the dishes, but the germ-hiding
scratches on plastic cutting boards can always use a little extra
sanitizing.

Then I let the bleach work on the bottles while I scrubbed the cutting
board and a stained white skillet, then rinsed the bottles and their
lids and valves thoroughly with hot tap water.

And when I emptied the drainer a few hours later, I put the bottles
into the freezer. I don't think I'll be using them any time soon.


Why in the freezer? I wash them and let them dry and stick them on the
shelf?

But I just stood up, put my hands on the desk, and transferred a great
deal of my weight to my arms and it didn't hurt. Holding my arm in
one unalterable position on the flatfoot *does* hurt. But there's
still getting on and getting off, and the possibility of needing to
take evasive action.

At least I can still walk as far as I want to.


21 May 2016

Rode the Fuji to the fairgrounds today, carrying the bottle that
didn't go green. The bleached bottles are still in the freezer.


--
cheers,

John B.


Joy Beeson May 23rd 16 04:35 AM

AG: Cleaning bottles
 
On Sun, 22 May 2016 14:08:09 +0700, John B.
wrote:

Why in the freezer? I wash them and let them dry and stick them on the
shelf?


I wasn't 100% sure they were completely dry.

When I put a bottle away for the winter, I air it for several hours,
then put a paper towel in the mouth to keep dust out and leave the cap
ajar. That was before tethered caps went out of style.

I'm down to three, plus one I plan to take back to Goodwill as soon as
I can ride that far. It has a flip-up cap to cover the valve, which I
thought a very good idea -- until I realized that the valve has to be
closed for the cap to close, and it's the now-usual "pry it up with a
clam knife" valve, so it's no use for taking a drink without getting
off the bike.

My newest bottle *can* be opened without tools, but not without using
both hands.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/




John B.[_6_] May 23rd 16 07:18 AM

AG: Cleaning bottles
 
On Mon, 23 May 2016 00:35:12 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:

On Sun, 22 May 2016 14:08:09 +0700, John B.
wrote:

Why in the freezer? I wash them and let them dry and stick them on the
shelf?


I wasn't 100% sure they were completely dry.

When I put a bottle away for the winter, I air it for several hours,
then put a paper towel in the mouth to keep dust out and leave the cap
ajar. That was before tethered caps went out of style.


I (we :-) treat them just like other drinking utensils. Wash, dry in
"drainer" stick 'em on the shelf. If they were there long enough to
gather dust just rinse them off before filling.

I'm down to three, plus one I plan to take back to Goodwill as soon as
I can ride that far. It has a flip-up cap to cover the valve, which I
thought a very good idea -- until I realized that the valve has to be
closed for the cap to close, and it's the now-usual "pry it up with a
clam knife" valve, so it's no use for taking a drink without getting
off the bike.


I've always used regular old bike bottles. I see them for sale with
magic covers to keep the dirt out and all that but I've never been
enticed into buying one. I do carry a small :good morning" towel in a
back pocket though and if a bottle looks really cruddy I do wipe it
off before drinking.

My newest bottle *can* be opened without tools, but not without using
both hands.


Well, you might have to grip a bottle between your knees but I'd think
that one way or the other a person could get most any "bottle" open if
he/she was thirsty enough :-)
--
cheers,

John B.


Joy Beeson May 24th 16 04:31 AM

AG: Cleaning bottles
 
On Mon, 23 May 2016 13:18:08 +0700, John B.
wrote:

Well, you might have to grip a bottle between your knees but I'd think
that one way or the other a person could get most any "bottle" open if
he/she was thirsty enough :-)


The back of my pocket knife fills in for a clam knife in case of need.

What I usually do is to pry up the valve on one bottle before leaving
the house, and when it's time to switch to the back-up bottle, I swap
caps.

The non-tethered caps are really annoying when I want to pour the
contents of one bottle into another. One bottle in each hand, one cap
in my teeth, and the other cap . . . I'm pretty sure I have a third
hand tucked away somewhere, but it's useful only when adjusting brake
cables.

I noticed the last time I passed the Trailhouse that the bottles in
the window don't have the same decorations as the bottle I'm now
using. I should check to see whether they are better bottles.

The two National-Guard bottles (garage sale) are still in the freezer.
It looks as though it will be quite warm before I can stay out all
day; perhaps I should freeze some tea in them.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/




John B.[_6_] May 24th 16 11:09 AM

AG: Cleaning bottles
 
On Tue, 24 May 2016 00:31:46 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:

On Mon, 23 May 2016 13:18:08 +0700, John B.
wrote:

Well, you might have to grip a bottle between your knees but I'd think
that one way or the other a person could get most any "bottle" open if
he/she was thirsty enough :-)


The back of my pocket knife fills in for a clam knife in case of need.


You need a clam knife to drink out of a bike bottle? :-)

What I usually do is to pry up the valve on one bottle before leaving
the house, and when it's time to switch to the back-up bottle, I swap
caps.

The non-tethered caps are really annoying when I want to pour the
contents of one bottle into another. One bottle in each hand, one cap
in my teeth, and the other cap . . . I'm pretty sure I have a third
hand tucked away somewhere, but it's useful only when adjusting brake
cables.



Naw, take one top off and throw it on the ground - you got to wash the
bottle anyway. Hold the other top in your teeth and pour. Put the full
bottle in the bottle cage, pick up the top from the ground and away
you go :-)

I noticed the last time I passed the Trailhouse that the bottles in
the window don't have the same decorations as the bottle I'm now
using. I should check to see whether they are better bottles.


My experience is that all bike bottles are about the same, except for
the decoration and most of them will leak :-)

The two National-Guard bottles (garage sale) are still in the freezer.
It looks as though it will be quite warm before I can stay out all
day; perhaps I should freeze some tea in them.


It is HOT in Thailand so if it is a two bottle day I fill the bottles
and put one in the fridge and the second in the freezer. (drink from
the fridge bottle first)

It works for about the first half of the day then they both get hot.

Since almost every filling station I pass has a 7-11, or similar shop,
attached I have been thinking about carrying some drink mix in my
pocket and stopping at a 7-11 for a bottle of cold water and mix my
on, on the run, as it were. Warm drink when you are all hot and sweaty
is not very palatable.
--
cheers,

John B.


Joy Beeson May 29th 16 04:02 AM

AG: Squirrel!
 

24 May 2016

Today I'm planning to ride farther than I can walk for the first time
since the Good Friday incident.

(Actually, the damage was done on the preceding Monday, and I didn't
have enough sense to lie around and let it heal. Come Friday, my
roommate made an emergency appointment with my doctor, and a six-day
course of corticosteroids fixed the arthritis right up -- but the arm
I sprained trying to get out of bed just won't heal.)

Getting ready to ride requires that I refurbish the newspaper sleeve
that the squirrels got at. I was much amused to see that they had
chewed a hole in the newspaper sleeve and had been trying mightily to
drag out -- a zip-lock sandwich bag of fold-lock sandwich bags.

If you ride long enough to buy food along the way, you need a supply
of plastic bags so that you can save some of it for later. (And never
order your sub toasted: it's such a shame to let it get cold that you
are going to founder.)

I used to go to a farm store in Altamont and buy one-quart freezer-box
liners, but that changed from a six-mile ride to an eight-hundred mile
ride.

(Four of us actually did that ride once, back when U-Val was the only
functioning sunscreen, and you had to re-apply it at every stop. I
got chalky rings around my ankles where the U-Val had migrated down
through my sweat.) (But we flew back.)

Then I bought quart-size Baggies at Avila's Mexican Supermarket, but
Avila burned down. So the nearest I can find to a one-pint no-zipper
bag is the fold-top sandwich bag. Well, most of the time it's big
enough, and one can use two bags for oversized items. (I also carry
twist-ties; they come with my gallon-size bags and I use clothespins
instead, so I have plenty.)

The squirrels had better luck when they tried to pull my snack bag of
condiments through a hole in the newspaper sleeve -- there was a tub
of margarine in the corner of the bag they got outside the sleeve. The
squirrels must not like margarine any more than I do; they ate only
half of it. Or it might be that it's not the season when animals are
desperate for fat to burn for heat.

If you sometimes lunch at grocery stores, you need to carry a snack
bag into which you drop any single-serve packets of seasoning that
aren't eaten with the snack they came with. An envelope of Mayo is
particularly useful. I don't like Mayo much, but there are times when
a little grease is very welcome.

(Is "snack bag" a world-wide term? It's the marketing name of a
zipper bag as wide as a sandwich bag, but only half as high.)

Evening: I didn't buy anything to put condiments on; I lunched on a
"fruit-and-grain bar" (fig newton made outta blueberry jam) and bought
a pint of whole milk at Dollar General.

I felt a twinge in my shoulder when I dismounted while squeezing the
brake after the ride, but otherwise the only thing that hurt was
signaling a left turn -- which I do only twice on this route.

Aaaand . . . I just got up and put my new newspaper sleeve into the
soda fridge. The squirrels haven't figured out how to open the fridge
yet. I hope they don't know that that is were we keep the raw
peanuts.

--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.


John B.[_6_] May 29th 16 08:17 AM

AG: Squirrel!
 
On Sun, 29 May 2016 00:02:14 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:


24 May 2016

Today I'm planning to ride farther than I can walk for the first time
since the Good Friday incident.

(Actually, the damage was done on the preceding Monday, and I didn't
have enough sense to lie around and let it heal. Come Friday, my
roommate made an emergency appointment with my doctor, and a six-day
course of corticosteroids fixed the arthritis right up -- but the arm
I sprained trying to get out of bed just won't heal.)

Getting ready to ride requires that I refurbish the newspaper sleeve
that the squirrels got at. I was much amused to see that they had
chewed a hole in the newspaper sleeve and had been trying mightily to
drag out -- a zip-lock sandwich bag of fold-lock sandwich bags.


What is a "Newspaper sleeve"? It sounds like some sort of paper bag?



If you ride long enough to buy food along the way, you need a supply
of plastic bags so that you can save some of it for later. (And never
order your sub toasted: it's such a shame to let it get cold that you
are going to founder.)

I used to go to a farm store in Altamont and buy one-quart freezer-box
liners, but that changed from a six-mile ride to an eight-hundred mile
ride.

(Four of us actually did that ride once, back when U-Val was the only
functioning sunscreen, and you had to re-apply it at every stop. I
got chalky rings around my ankles where the U-Val had migrated down
through my sweat.) (But we flew back.)

Then I bought quart-size Baggies at Avila's Mexican Supermarket, but
Avila burned down. So the nearest I can find to a one-pint no-zipper
bag is the fold-top sandwich bag. Well, most of the time it's big
enough, and one can use two bags for oversized items. (I also carry
twist-ties; they come with my gallon-size bags and I use clothespins
instead, so I have plenty.)




The squirrels had better luck when they tried to pull my snack bag of
condiments through a hole in the newspaper sleeve -- there was a tub
of margarine in the corner of the bag they got outside the sleeve. The
squirrels must not like margarine any more than I do; they ate only
half of it. Or it might be that it's not the season when animals are
desperate for fat to burn for heat.

If you sometimes lunch at grocery stores, you need to carry a snack
bag into which you drop any single-serve packets of seasoning that
aren't eaten with the snack they came with. An envelope of Mayo is
particularly useful. I don't like Mayo much, but there are times when
a little grease is very welcome.

(Is "snack bag" a world-wide term? It's the marketing name of a
zipper bag as wide as a sandwich bag, but only half as high.)

Evening: I didn't buy anything to put condiments on; I lunched on a
"fruit-and-grain bar" (fig newton made outta blueberry jam) and bought
a pint of whole milk at Dollar General.

I felt a twinge in my shoulder when I dismounted while squeezing the
brake after the ride, but otherwise the only thing that hurt was
signaling a left turn -- which I do only twice on this route.

Aaaand . . . I just got up and put my new newspaper sleeve into the
soda fridge. The squirrels haven't figured out how to open the fridge
yet. I hope they don't know that that is were we keep the raw
peanuts.

--
cheers,

John B.



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