A Cycling & bikes forum. CycleBanter.com

Go Back   Home » CycleBanter.com forum » rec.bicycles » Techniques
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Protecting yourself



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #61  
Old June 8th 19, 12:58 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,448
Default Protecting yourself

On 6/7/2019 3:35 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Friday, June 7, 2019 at 2:59:18 PM UTC-4, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Friday, June 7, 2019 at 9:23:30 AM UTC-4, duane wrote:
On 07/06/2019 8:57 a.m., Rolf Mantel wrote:
Am 07.06.2019 um 14:03 schrieb Duane:
On 06/06/2019 8:54 p.m., John B. wrote:
On Thu, 6 Jun 2019 23:12:18 -0000 (UTC), Duane wrote:

John B. wrote:
On Thu, 6 Jun 2019 12:48:44 -0400, Frank Krygowski wrote:

On 6/6/2019 8:54 AM, Rolf Mantel wrote:

I have sat in a car as a passenger when the driver was texted by his
wife and sent an answer via Siri.¬ Needed a few repetitions to
get the
right text but still simpler than ringing her to pass the estimated
arrival time.

And it's now so important to tell one's arrival time?

And when did all this become so important? And why now when¬ just a
few short years ago no one was frantically advising the world that
they would arrive in just three short minutes? Or perhaps 2 minutes
and 59 seconds?

Who said anything about 3 short minutes?¬ Maybe you're replying to
Frank's straw man?

The real situation was as follows: We (two dads a coaches) were taking
some kids to a "First Lego League" regional competition, leaving home
early in the morning; we had only a vague idea how long the competition
would run.

Perfect communication would have been to text the wife before getting
into the car for the way back.¬ As the husband forgot to do so, the wife
texted short before 8pm "When are you coming home?", and the husband
answered "Almost home. I'll drop M. off in Dossenheim and be home in 30
- 60 mins".

Typical for me is "There's an accident on the 401 and traffic is
blocked. I'm still in if you guys can wait for me. If not, see you
next ride."

No idea why the luddites come out whenever anything relatively new is
mentioned.


Get a grip, please. I don't recall anyone complaining about "I'll be half an hour
late. But I did say I don't see the sense of "I'll be there in five minutes"
when there's not emergency going on.

Jay didn't see the sense of "I'm buying lettuce right now," and I agree. I can't
imagine the insecurity inherent in having to give minute by minute reports of
every small activity.

And regarding the original issue of the post, I _don't_ believe that all the
dolts texting while they drive are 30 minutes delayed to an emergency situation.
I think it's FAR more likely that they're talking about the lettuce they just
bought, or something roughly that important.

If they don't like them so much why don't they just ditch the cell phone entirely instead of complaining about how others use them?


I don't think the dislike is about the tool. It's about the behavior.

A person can like cars, but not like motorists buzzing cyclists. A person can
like guns, but not like people going to their workplace and shooting a dozen
co-workers. A person can like cell phones but not like texting while driving,
or yammering loud and long in otherwise quiet public places.

- Frank Krygowski


+1 from this luddite

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Ads
  #62  
Old June 8th 19, 01:07 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
jOHN b.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 627
Default Protecting yourself

4On Fri, 7 Jun 2019 15:59:21 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

On Thursday, June 6, 2019 at 12:43:47 AM UTC-5, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 5 Jun 2019 19:24:48 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

On Wednesday, June 5, 2019 at 1:28:42 PM UTC-5, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Tue, 4 Jun 2019 23:47:42 -0700 (PDT), Andy
wrote:

I have thought about carrying a short range cell
phone jammer while biking.

I guess you know that cell phone jammers are illegal.
https://www.fcc.gov/general/jammer-enforcement

I have given it careful thought.

Think some more.

But when traveling as a
passenger I increasingly see drivers drifting over into other lanes.
They are irresponsible idiots who are a danger to everyone.

It won't work the way you expect. Jamming a cell phone will cause the
phone to disconnect unexpectedly. The driver will wonder what
happened to their call in progress and begin finger poking at the
screen trying to re-establish the call. That's not a great idea while
moving.

Prior to your jammer being turned on, the driver was minimally
distracted. After jamming, the driver became actively engaged in
operating the phone and has become seriously distracted. You may
think that full time jamming only prevents initiating or receiving
phone calls. That might be true if you were moving at the same speed
as the traffic. However, there will be many cars passing you on your
bicycle, in both directions, some of which might be engaged in a legal
hands free phone conversation. Your jammer will disconnect their call
in progress, cause them to finger poke at the screen, and probably
cause an accident while they are distracted.

Also, there are now so a substantial number of cellular bands in use
(and growing with every FCC auction). Unless you plan to carry a
rather large box on your bicycle, it is unlikely that you can
efficiently jam all of them. At best, a simple jammer will take out
all the customers of one particular vendor, leaving the other vendors
bands unaffected.
http://www.gasiajammer.com/sale-8508330-new-all-in-one-16-channels-high-power-desktop-signal-jammer-70-meters-sheilding-range.html
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMOpxrs53YQ



--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

Any phone use whether hands free or not is distracted driver. i.e. dangerous driver

If not every phone is knocked out, no problemo.

They may figure out that their phone only misbehaves when driving.

:-)

Fred


My guess is that the immediate result of someone's phone stopping
would be an immediate flurry of shaking the phone and feverously
pushing buttons to get the damned thing to work. Rather than cause the
driver to pay more attention to driving I suspect that it would have
exactly the opposite effect and he/she/it's attention would be wholly
on the phone.

In fact we had a crash a few years ago, for a somewhat similar reason,
where a pickup drove straight into the rear of two cyclists and killed
them both. The pickup driver said that he had dropped his phone and
was bending down to pick it up and didn't see the bicycles.

For any that are interested the driver is now serving a prison term
for causing a highway death.
--
cheers,

John B.


You made my point. Driving while using phone kills.

I am waiting for a law that would incarcerate drivers who have accidents while using the phone.

Cuff and stuff em.

Andy


Singapore has a law that you cannot hold a phone in your hand while
driving however you can use a "hands free" headset. They claim that it
does reduce accidents due to inattention.They strictly enforce the law
and the penalty is, I believe, a $1,000 fine.
--
cheers,

John B.

  #63  
Old June 8th 19, 02:43 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Radey Shouman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,268
Default Protecting yourself

Sir Ridesalot writes:

On Friday, June 7, 2019 at 4:02:50 PM UTC-4, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, June 7, 2019 at 11:59:18 AM UTC-7, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Friday, June 7, 2019 at 9:23:30 AM UTC-4, duane wrote:
On 07/06/2019 8:57 a.m., Rolf Mantel wrote:
Am 07.06.2019 um 14:03 schrieb Duane:
On 06/06/2019 8:54 p.m., John B. wrote:
On Thu, 6 Jun 2019 23:12:18 -0000 (UTC), Duane wrote:

John B. wrote:
On Thu, 6 Jun 2019 12:48:44 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 6/6/2019 8:54 AM, Rolf Mantel wrote:

I have sat in a car as a passenger when the driver was texted by his
wife and sent an answer via Siri.¬* Needed a few repetitions to
get the
right text but still simpler than ringing her to pass the estimated
arrival time.

And it's now so important to tell one's arrival time?

And when did all this become so important? And why now when¬* just a
few short years ago no one was frantically advising the world that
they would arrive in just three short minutes? Or perhaps 2 minutes
and 59 seconds?

Who said anything about 3 short minutes?¬* Maybe you're replying to
Frank's straw man?

The real situation was as follows: We (two dads a coaches) were taking
some kids to a "First Lego League" regional competition, leaving home
early in the morning; we had only a vague idea how long the competition
would run.

Perfect communication would have been to text the wife before getting
into the car for the way back.¬* As the husband forgot to do so, the wife
texted short before 8pm "When are you coming home?", and the husband
answered "Almost home. I'll drop M. off in Dossenheim and be home in 30
- 60 mins".

Typical for me is "There's an accident on the 401 and traffic is
blocked. I'm still in if you guys can wait for me. If not, see you
next ride."

No idea why the luddites come out whenever anything relatively new is
mentioned.

If they don't like them so much why don't they just ditch the cell
phone entirely instead of complaining about how others use them?
After all, it's not really that many years ago that there were no
cell phones and you had to use a land line to call anyone.


Try finding a pay phone. I have a cell phone but it has not become a
way of life or an undue distraction. There is also a difference
between being a Luddite and being po-lite. I don't yak on my phone
in public places or burden people with dopey texts and pictures of
my dinner entree. Nothing I do or eat is worthy of immediate
broadcast. I do let people know when I'm going to be late, but
usually by more than three minutes.

-- Jay Beattie.


I think that the preponderance of cell phones is a major reason why
there are so few pay phones left.

I remember stopping off at a large very well known coffee place in
St. George, Ontario, Canada and seeing perhaps 20 people sitting
around a large table (or 2 tables put together) and EVERY SINGLE
person at that table was yakking/texting or otherwise engaged with
their cellphone. People get together to ext? Or are they sharing
things?

I've seen people call or text a family member from a store so that
they could tell them about some in-store special and ask if they
wanted any of it.

As far as using a cellphone to tell someone you'll be there in a few
minutes; that can be very useful when you're going to be waiting
outside for them. My friends will often text or call me within a few
minutes of their arrival so that I can have my bike and myself ready
and waiting for them when they pull into the apartment building
driveway. It saves time.

I have a flip-phone that a family member got me for emergencies. It's
all I need or want. Others might want all the latest bells and
whistles because those are useful to them.


Cell-phone parking lots at airports seem like a really good reason to
call someone to say, "I just landed". They save a lot of parking fees
and time loafing around outside the security checkpoint.
  #64  
Old June 8th 19, 03:12 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,239
Default Protecting yourself

On Friday, June 7, 2019 at 7:01:55 PM UTC-4, AK wrote:

When I call someone, I ask if they are driving.

If they are, I ask them to call me when they are not driving.


I do the same. I'm nice about it, but I won't contribute to this problem.

A few years ago, an acquaintance called me and said "I'm on Route XXX now [a
spot close to my home] and I wondered if I could ..."

I asked "Are you driving now?"

He said "Yes, and ... oh! Oh! ... um, can I call you back? I almost had an - an
incident."

He never did stop by, and he never did give me the details. But I can imagine.

- Frank Krygowski
  #65  
Old June 8th 19, 03:23 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,239
Default Protecting yourself

On Friday, June 7, 2019 at 9:43:37 PM UTC-4, Radey Shouman wrote:


Cell-phone parking lots at airports seem like a really good reason to
call someone to say, "I just landed". They save a lot of parking fees
and time loafing around outside the security checkpoint.


I agree with that.

It's not that cell phones are never useful. But they are grossly over-used.

They're also seductive. Obviously, I rode for decades without one, because they
didn't exist. Then my wife had to get one for her work, in which she traveled
a lot.

When she and I both retired, she essentially gave it up, so I took it over. Now
it seems silly to do a bike ride without taking it along. And the few times it
does ring when I'm on a ride, it's very difficult to not answer it, or at least
check to see who's calling. :-/

But I do reject most of those calls. And I reject all of them while I'm driving.

- Frank Krygowski

  #66  
Old June 8th 19, 03:56 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,994
Default Protecting yourself

On Friday, June 7, 2019 at 6:43:37 PM UTC-7, Radey Shouman wrote:
Sir Ridesalot writes:

On Friday, June 7, 2019 at 4:02:50 PM UTC-4, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, June 7, 2019 at 11:59:18 AM UTC-7, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Friday, June 7, 2019 at 9:23:30 AM UTC-4, duane wrote:
On 07/06/2019 8:57 a.m., Rolf Mantel wrote:
Am 07.06.2019 um 14:03 schrieb Duane:
On 06/06/2019 8:54 p.m., John B. wrote:
On Thu, 6 Jun 2019 23:12:18 -0000 (UTC), Duane wrote:

John B. wrote:
On Thu, 6 Jun 2019 12:48:44 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 6/6/2019 8:54 AM, Rolf Mantel wrote:

I have sat in a car as a passenger when the driver was texted by his
wife and sent an answer via Siri.¬* Needed a few repetitions to
get the
right text but still simpler than ringing her to pass the estimated
arrival time.

And it's now so important to tell one's arrival time?

And when did all this become so important? And why now when¬* just a
few short years ago no one was frantically advising the world that
they would arrive in just three short minutes? Or perhaps 2 minutes
and 59 seconds?

Who said anything about 3 short minutes?¬* Maybe you're replying to
Frank's straw man?

The real situation was as follows: We (two dads a coaches) were taking
some kids to a "First Lego League" regional competition, leaving home
early in the morning; we had only a vague idea how long the competition
would run.

Perfect communication would have been to text the wife before getting
into the car for the way back.¬* As the husband forgot to do so, the wife
texted short before 8pm "When are you coming home?", and the husband
answered "Almost home. I'll drop M. off in Dossenheim and be home in 30
- 60 mins".

Typical for me is "There's an accident on the 401 and traffic is
blocked. I'm still in if you guys can wait for me. If not, see you
next ride."

No idea why the luddites come out whenever anything relatively new is
mentioned.

If they don't like them so much why don't they just ditch the cell
phone entirely instead of complaining about how others use them?
After all, it's not really that many years ago that there were no
cell phones and you had to use a land line to call anyone.

Try finding a pay phone. I have a cell phone but it has not become a
way of life or an undue distraction. There is also a difference
between being a Luddite and being po-lite. I don't yak on my phone
in public places or burden people with dopey texts and pictures of
my dinner entree. Nothing I do or eat is worthy of immediate
broadcast. I do let people know when I'm going to be late, but
usually by more than three minutes.

-- Jay Beattie.


I think that the preponderance of cell phones is a major reason why
there are so few pay phones left.

I remember stopping off at a large very well known coffee place in
St. George, Ontario, Canada and seeing perhaps 20 people sitting
around a large table (or 2 tables put together) and EVERY SINGLE
person at that table was yakking/texting or otherwise engaged with
their cellphone. People get together to ext? Or are they sharing
things?

I've seen people call or text a family member from a store so that
they could tell them about some in-store special and ask if they
wanted any of it.

As far as using a cellphone to tell someone you'll be there in a few
minutes; that can be very useful when you're going to be waiting
outside for them. My friends will often text or call me within a few
minutes of their arrival so that I can have my bike and myself ready
and waiting for them when they pull into the apartment building
driveway. It saves time.

I have a flip-phone that a family member got me for emergencies. It's
all I need or want. Others might want all the latest bells and
whistles because those are useful to them.


Cell-phone parking lots at airports seem like a really good reason to
call someone to say, "I just landed". They save a lot of parking fees
and time loafing around outside the security checkpoint.


I've used them many times, and they're really convenient depending on the airport (some can be packed).

The phone is also good for checking arrivals, summoning Lyft or Uber, pictures, maps. When I'm traveling, the iPhone is like a Swiss Army Knife. I like that part of the modern era. Pictures are great just for record keeping. Take a picture of your passport or the front of your hotel. "Take me here."

-- Jay Beattie.
  #67  
Old June 8th 19, 04:35 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,327
Default Protecting yourself

On Fri, 7 Jun 2019 15:59:21 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:


You made my point. Driving while using phone kills.

I am waiting for a law that would incarcerate drivers who have accidents while using the phone.

Cuff and stuff em.


Leave the word "phone" out of this. I don't care whether the person
who killed me dropped a phone, a tape cassette, or a milkshake.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/

  #68  
Old June 8th 19, 06:42 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,327
Default Protecting yourself

On Fri, 7 Jun 2019 19:23:36 -0700 (PDT), Frank Krygowski
wrote:

Now
it seems silly to do a bike ride without taking it along.


I have a special pocket in my jerseys for my cell phone. It started
out as a watch pocket, but pocket watches are extremely hard to find
and wrist-watches tend to reset themselves when carried in a pocket.

Now the cell phone is replacing my spare tube as well as my watch.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/



  #69  
Old June 9th 19, 03:26 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
jOHN b.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 627
Default Protecting yourself

tOn Fri, 07 Jun 2019 21:43:35 -0400, Radey Shouman
wrote:

Sir Ridesalot writes:

On Friday, June 7, 2019 at 4:02:50 PM UTC-4, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, June 7, 2019 at 11:59:18 AM UTC-7, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Friday, June 7, 2019 at 9:23:30 AM UTC-4, duane wrote:
On 07/06/2019 8:57 a.m., Rolf Mantel wrote:
Am 07.06.2019 um 14:03 schrieb Duane:
On 06/06/2019 8:54 p.m., John B. wrote:
On Thu, 6 Jun 2019 23:12:18 -0000 (UTC), Duane wrote:

John B. wrote:
On Thu, 6 Jun 2019 12:48:44 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 6/6/2019 8:54 AM, Rolf Mantel wrote:

I have sat in a car as a passenger when the driver was texted by his
wife and sent an answer via Siri.* Needed a few repetitions to
get the
right text but still simpler than ringing her to pass the estimated
arrival time.

And it's now so important to tell one's arrival time?

And when did all this become so important? And why now when* just a
few short years ago no one was frantically advising the world that
they would arrive in just three short minutes? Or perhaps 2 minutes
and 59 seconds?

Who said anything about 3 short minutes?* Maybe you're replying to
Frank's straw man?

The real situation was as follows: We (two dads a coaches) were taking
some kids to a "First Lego League" regional competition, leaving home
early in the morning; we had only a vague idea how long the competition
would run.

Perfect communication would have been to text the wife before getting
into the car for the way back.* As the husband forgot to do so, the wife
texted short before 8pm "When are you coming home?", and the husband
answered "Almost home. I'll drop M. off in Dossenheim and be home in 30
- 60 mins".

Typical for me is "There's an accident on the 401 and traffic is
blocked. I'm still in if you guys can wait for me. If not, see you
next ride."

No idea why the luddites come out whenever anything relatively new is
mentioned.

If they don't like them so much why don't they just ditch the cell
phone entirely instead of complaining about how others use them?
After all, it's not really that many years ago that there were no
cell phones and you had to use a land line to call anyone.

Try finding a pay phone. I have a cell phone but it has not become a
way of life or an undue distraction. There is also a difference
between being a Luddite and being po-lite. I don't yak on my phone
in public places or burden people with dopey texts and pictures of
my dinner entree. Nothing I do or eat is worthy of immediate
broadcast. I do let people know when I'm going to be late, but
usually by more than three minutes.

-- Jay Beattie.


I think that the preponderance of cell phones is a major reason why
there are so few pay phones left.

I remember stopping off at a large very well known coffee place in
St. George, Ontario, Canada and seeing perhaps 20 people sitting
around a large table (or 2 tables put together) and EVERY SINGLE
person at that table was yakking/texting or otherwise engaged with
their cellphone. People get together to ext? Or are they sharing
things?

I've seen people call or text a family member from a store so that
they could tell them about some in-store special and ask if they
wanted any of it.

As far as using a cellphone to tell someone you'll be there in a few
minutes; that can be very useful when you're going to be waiting
outside for them. My friends will often text or call me within a few
minutes of their arrival so that I can have my bike and myself ready
and waiting for them when they pull into the apartment building
driveway. It saves time.

I have a flip-phone that a family member got me for emergencies. It's
all I need or want. Others might want all the latest bells and
whistles because those are useful to them.


Cell-phone parking lots at airports seem like a really good reason to
call someone to say, "I just landed". They save a lot of parking fees
and time loafing around outside the security checkpoint.


"I have just landed" is almost meaningless at the airports here as it
is going to take at least another hour to get your baggage :-)
--
cheers,

John B.

  #70  
Old June 9th 19, 03:33 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
jOHN b.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 627
Default Protecting yourself

On Fri, 7 Jun 2019 19:23:36 -0700 (PDT), Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On Friday, June 7, 2019 at 9:43:37 PM UTC-4, Radey Shouman wrote:


Cell-phone parking lots at airports seem like a really good reason to
call someone to say, "I just landed". They save a lot of parking fees
and time loafing around outside the security checkpoint.


I agree with that.

It's not that cell phones are never useful. But they are grossly over-used.

They're also seductive. Obviously, I rode for decades without one, because they
didn't exist. Then my wife had to get one for her work, in which she traveled
a lot.

When she and I both retired, she essentially gave it up, so I took it over. Now
it seems silly to do a bike ride without taking it along. And the few times it
does ring when I'm on a ride, it's very difficult to not answer it, or at least
check to see who's calling. :-/

But I do reject most of those calls. And I reject all of them while I'm driving.

- Frank Krygowski


I carry a phone on rides primarily because when I broke my hip and was
laying on the side of the road, in considerable pain, I was able to
call my wife and she drove the pickup down, threw the bike in the rear
and loaded me in the front and took me to the hospital.

In fact, I recently bought a new "old style" phone just for cycling.
The sort that you can only talk on as it is small, light, and fits in
my pocket easily.
--
cheers,

John B.

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Protecting the head ... Nick Kew UK 24 December 30th 06 10:19 AM
Protecting my shins pkplonker Unicycling 8 November 19th 06 10:02 AM
Protecting your saddle? firisfirefly Unicycling 0 August 3rd 06 06:43 AM
Protecting your saddle? mornish Unicycling 0 August 3rd 06 06:40 AM
Protecting your saddle? Jerrick Unicycling 0 August 3rd 06 06:39 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:18 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2019 CycleBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.