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3ttt new crank process



 
 
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  #31  
Old December 14th 19, 05:55 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tim McNamara
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Posts: 6,893
Default 3ttt new crank process

On Fri, 6 Dec 2019 14:02:37 -0800 (PST), Tom Kunich
wrote:
On Friday, December 6, 2019 at 1:28:54 PM UTC-8, Tim McNamara wrote:
On Sun, 1 Dec 2019 04:07:23 -0000 (UTC), news18
wrote:
On Sat, 30 Nov 2019 08:03:46 -0600, AMuzi wrote:

On 11/29/2019 11:44 PM, Chalo wrote:
I notice they have specified a perverse hole pattern. No one's
interest is served that way. Not even the manufacturer's,
because smart and experienced cyclists will avoid it.


It's the way of the world now, when a 22 year old with a CadCam
software can displace an experienced engineer. Hell, we just
changed a worn 53t 2009 Campagnolo chainring on a Record carbon
crank which entailed _both_ chainrings _and_ the bolt set for the
2011 style which are available, the 2009 being incompatible and
unavailable. And Campagnolo is not the worst of it.

Thank goodness I have four sets of TA cranks and over a dozen
unused chain rings. Those should see me out.


I'm still using my Ritchey Logic 110 mm cranks on almost all my
bikes. Ought to be rings available for those for a long time.

And, LOL, 8sp Shimano cassettes. Seems like the dark ages now, what
with 11sp being de rigeur, except for one bike with a 7sp freewheel
which I guess is the darker ages. But it's a 135 mm OLN and thus has
almost zero dish- same spokes since 1996 with no breakages so far.
Sooner or later...

Not a "disc" brake in sight in my house (except that rim brakes are
disc brakes). One bike with brifters. No CFRP, no AL or Ti frames.
All Brooks saddles of one sort or another. Tan wall tires, polished
rims.

I'm not keeping up with the times, I guess. What a Luddite! But
hey, I do have one of those fancy newfangled ISIS BBs on one of my
bikes. Wait, those are 15-20 years old too...


By the way - I have an 8 speed cassette that still has wear on it. It
is in an Ultegra box but it looks like it's a DuraAce. I also have a
DuraAce Triple front derailleur, a rear DuraAce derailleur with short
arms (probably 9 speed I would imagine it works the same as the 8),
and one of those toothed DuraAce bottom brackets used for triples.

If you want them you can get my email from whoever is the moderator
here and send me an email. They're yours for the price of shipping.
Though these days that's high enough.


That's very kind, Tom. Thanks for the offer!
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  #32  
Old December 14th 19, 06:05 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tim McNamara
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,893
Default 3ttt new crank process

On Fri, 6 Dec 2019 15:50:26 -0800 (PST), jbeattie
wrote:

ISIS sucks. I went through ISIS BBs like Kleenex. I was happy when
the crank broke, and I was rid of it.


Yeah, they have a reputation for failure due to the small bearing size
necessitated by the large axle. And ISTR problems with some cranks
bottoming out before acieving an interference fit. Mine is a Truvativ
crank and I think the BB is a Truvativ as well. I don't recall if it is
a first or second generation ISIS and I don't even know if they're still
in business. But it's been in service for some 15 years, seeing only
about 400 miles a year, so that might account for it- I maybe just
haven't put enough miles on it to show up the weaknesses.

I like the low Q factor the crank provides compared to Shimano or modern
Campy, which are more like birthing chairs. Jan Heine sells a high end
ISIS BB made by SKS, never have seen one. If the BB craps out, I might
even replace it with one of those.

I know a few people who really like disc brakes. I've only tried them a
couple of times and that was a few years back, so I imagine they're
better now. They were grabby and noisy when I tried them. I don't do a
lot of inclement, muddy or gravel riding so I just haven't experienced
those benefits. I live in Minnesota and the terrain is pretty flat, so
rim heating while braking on descents is a non-issue. The ability to
swap tires willy-nilly could be handy, though. I've got a couple bikes
where the brakes don't open quite wide enough to get an inflated wide
tire in and out easily; discs would solve that.
  #33  
Old December 14th 19, 05:42 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,494
Default 3ttt new crank process

On Friday, December 13, 2019 at 9:05:47 PM UTC-8, Tim McNamara wrote:
On Fri, 6 Dec 2019 15:50:26 -0800 (PST), jbeattie
wrote:

ISIS sucks. I went through ISIS BBs like Kleenex. I was happy when
the crank broke, and I was rid of it.


Yeah, they have a reputation for failure due to the small bearing size
necessitated by the large axle. And ISTR problems with some cranks
bottoming out before acieving an interference fit. Mine is a Truvativ
crank and I think the BB is a Truvativ as well. I don't recall if it is
a first or second generation ISIS and I don't even know if they're still
in business. But it's been in service for some 15 years, seeing only
about 400 miles a year, so that might account for it- I maybe just
haven't put enough miles on it to show up the weaknesses.

I like the low Q factor the crank provides compared to Shimano or modern
Campy, which are more like birthing chairs. Jan Heine sells a high end
ISIS BB made by SKS, never have seen one. If the BB craps out, I might
even replace it with one of those.

I know a few people who really like disc brakes. I've only tried them a
couple of times and that was a few years back, so I imagine they're
better now. They were grabby and noisy when I tried them. I don't do a
lot of inclement, muddy or gravel riding so I just haven't experienced
those benefits. I live in Minnesota and the terrain is pretty flat, so
rim heating while braking on descents is a non-issue. The ability to
swap tires willy-nilly could be handy, though. I've got a couple bikes
where the brakes don't open quite wide enough to get an inflated wide
tire in and out easily; discs would solve that.


I have a set of discs on my Synapse that make noise, but the discs on my commuter and gravel bike don't. It may be the organic OE pads on the Synapse as opposed to the metal pads on the other two bikes. The funny thing is that I was riding in the rain a few weeks ago with two friends, one on cable discs and one on cantis (a Kona CX bike), and everyone was making noise. It sounded like a cat slaughter when we all came to a stop.

I rode in the rain or wet every day this week. I'll ride in wet today. Discs are nice in these conditions, but successful stopping is more often related to traction. The Synapse is my fast rain bike and has 28mm 4Seasons which have pretty good grip. I have Gatorskins on my commuter, and they seem less grippy, which is the price you pay for more durability. I'd rather stay upright and have faster wearing tires and will throw on something softer and fatter in a while and just cope with flats, if I get them.

-- Jay Beattie.
 




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