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Belt drive



 
 
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  #11  
Old April 13th 19, 03:49 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 1,517
Default Belt drive

On Friday, April 12, 2019 at 8:45:25 PM UTC-5, Tim McNamara wrote:
On Fri, 12 Apr 2019 19:19:22 -0500, AMuzi wrote:
On 4/12/2019 6:37 PM, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 12 Apr 2019 16:07:53 -0700 (PDT), "
wrote:

On Friday, April 12, 2019 at 9:27:51 AM UTC-5, db wrote:
My son is set on getting a belt drive for the bike he is building.
What is good about them? You have to have the exact length for your
bike, and if it breaks, it is very expensive to replace.

So, why?

-- Dieter Britz

Go over to YouTube and do a search on Gates Belt Drive. A number of
videos will appear that talks about bikes with this drive system and
usually Rohloff or Pinion gear boxes.

There was a guy at a marina where I kept my boat that had an aluminum
single speed bike with a belt drive. It apparently worked great, he
parked it on the dock next to his boat and it was there for years and
years with no apparent maintenance what so ever. A chain drive would
have been rusted itself into one solid chunk in that period :-)



Was that the Bridgestone OPC14 with V Belt drive?
I sold those . Nicely done, great price, no complaints.


Wild looking thing:

https://sheldonbrown.com/bridgestone...e-opc-14b.html


It says that little bike weighed 29 pounds! I know the belt drive did not add that much. Did the bell and basket add all the extra tonnage?
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  #12  
Old April 13th 19, 03:50 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
jOHN b.
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Posts: 763
Default Belt drive

On Fri, 12 Apr 2019 19:19:22 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

On 4/12/2019 6:37 PM, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 12 Apr 2019 16:07:53 -0700 (PDT), "
wrote:

On Friday, April 12, 2019 at 9:27:51 AM UTC-5, db wrote:
My son is set on getting a belt drive for the bike he
is building. What is good about them? You have to have
the exact length for your bike, and if it breaks, it
is very expensive to replace.

So, why?

--
Dieter Britz

Go over to YouTube and do a search on Gates Belt Drive. A number of videos will appear that talks about bikes with this drive system and usually Rohloff or Pinion gear boxes.


There was a guy at a marina where I kept my boat that had an aluminum
single speed bike with a belt drive. It apparently worked great, he
parked it on the dock next to his boat and it was there for years and
years with no apparent maintenance what so ever. A chain drive would
have been rusted itself into one solid chunk in that period :-)



Was that the Bridgestone OPC14 with V Belt drive?
I sold those . Nicely done, great price, no complaints.


I don't know. I did noticed that it was a "notched" Vee belt although
I don't think that the pulleys were notched and it was not a fixie and
had brakes fore and aft.
--
cheers,

John B.

  #13  
Old April 13th 19, 08:52 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tosspot[_3_]
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Posts: 1,330
Default Belt drive

On 12/04/2019 16:27, db wrote:
My son is set on getting a belt drive for the bike he
is building. What is good about them? You have to have
the exact length for your bike, and if it breaks, it
is very expensive to replace.

So, why?


Clean, quiet, lighter, maintenance free. You'll need to break the frame
somehow (or a split belt. Anyone used one?) and you'll need either
horizontal dropouts or a eccentric bottom bracket, they have quie a bit
of tension.

For a commuter, with a decent frame, I'd go that way now, for just about
any other application I'd stick with a chain.
  #14  
Old April 13th 19, 12:12 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 451
Default Belt drive

On Saturday, April 13, 2019 at 9:52:22 AM UTC+2, Tosspot wrote:
On 12/04/2019 16:27, db wrote:
My son is set on getting a belt drive for the bike he
is building. What is good about them? You have to have
the exact length for your bike, and if it breaks, it
is very expensive to replace.

So, why?


Clean, quiet, lighter, maintenance free. You'll need to break the frame
somehow (or a split belt. Anyone used one?) and you'll need either
horizontal dropouts or a eccentric bottom bracket, they have quie a bit
of tension.

For a commuter, with a decent frame, I'd go that way now, for just about
any other application I'd stick with a chain.


+1 Something like this:

https://www.rosebikes.nl/rose-black-...-heren-2676774

Lou
  #15  
Old April 16th 19, 09:53 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 5,800
Default Belt drive

On 2019-04-12 07:27, db wrote:
My son is set on getting a belt drive for the bike he
is building. What is good about them? You have to have
the exact length for your bike, and if it breaks, it
is very expensive to replace.

So, why?


Dad gave him too much money :-)

Now, a shaft drive, that would be great.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #16  
Old April 25th 19, 07:00 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Roger Merriman[_4_]
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Posts: 178
Default Belt drive

Joerg wrote:
On 2019-04-12 07:27, db wrote:
My son is set on getting a belt drive for the bike he
is building. What is good about them? You have to have
the exact length for your bike, and if it breaks, it
is very expensive to replace.

So, why?


Dad gave him too much money :-)

Now, a shaft drive, that would be great.


Imagine it would be much heavier and complicated, they have been tried and
used on MTB but don’t seem to have been cracked, I think generally the
extra weight/cost though a E-MTB would mitigate that?

Given a choice I’d love a belt drive bike for the commute as I clock up
fairly respectable distances per day which does chew though the drive
chain.

Roger Merriman

  #17  
Old April 25th 19, 07:54 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tosspot[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,330
Default Belt drive

On 25/04/2019 19.00, Roger Merriman wrote:
Joerg wrote:
On 2019-04-12 07:27, db wrote:
My son is set on getting a belt drive for the bike he
is building. What is good about them? You have to have
the exact length for your bike, and if it breaks, it
is very expensive to replace.

So, why?


Dad gave him too much money :-)

Now, a shaft drive, that would be great.


Imagine it would be much heavier and complicated, they have been tried and
used on MTB but don’t seem to have been cracked, I think generally the
extra weight/cost though a E-MTB would mitigate that?

Given a choice I’d love a belt drive bike for the commute as I clock up
fairly respectable distances per day which does chew though the drive
chain.


Have to say a belt ticks far more boxes that a shaft. If I were doing
it all over again, a belt would be the answer, you don't even have to
enclose it.

  #18  
Old April 25th 19, 08:22 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 5,800
Default Belt drive

On 2019-04-25 11:00, Roger Merriman wrote:
Joerg wrote:
On 2019-04-12 07:27, db wrote:
My son is set on getting a belt drive for the bike he
is building. What is good about them? You have to have
the exact length for your bike, and if it breaks, it
is very expensive to replace.

So, why?


Dad gave him too much money :-)

Now, a shaft drive, that would be great.


Imagine it would be much heavier and complicated, they have been tried and
used on MTB but don’t seem to have been cracked, I think generally the
extra weight/cost though a E-MTB would mitigate that?


Motorcycle manufacturers have figured it out, most of all BMW. That
company should also build MTB, they know how it's done. Weight doesn't
always matter, especially not for many MTB riders. We just want less
wear and most importanly not have to clean and lube the chain every 50
miles.

It often takes the bicycle industry decades longer to figure something
out. Such as decent heavy-duty rack space on FS MTB and central-battery
powered lighting where, no surprise, I had to build it all myself. Beats
me why one still cannot buy this:

http://www.analogconsultants.com/ng/bike/Muddy5.JPG

It's lasted many thousand hard miles now which included heavy loads.
Yeah, that bike is heavy but it never breaks down anymore.


Given a choice I’d love a belt drive bike for the commute as I clock up
fairly respectable distances per day which does chew though the drive
chain.


I'd be careful ...

https://www.thelocal.se/20180524/ike...-lead-to-falls

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #19  
Old April 25th 19, 10:03 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
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Posts: 4,406
Default Belt drive

On Thursday, April 25, 2019 at 3:22:36 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-04-25 11:00, Roger Merriman wrote:
Joerg wrote:
On 2019-04-12 07:27, db wrote:
My son is set on getting a belt drive for the bike he
is building. What is good about them? You have to have
the exact length for your bike, and if it breaks, it
is very expensive to replace.

So, why?


Dad gave him too much money :-)

Now, a shaft drive, that would be great.


Imagine it would be much heavier and complicated, they have been tried and
used on MTB but don’t seem to have been cracked, I think generally the
extra weight/cost though a E-MTB would mitigate that?


Motorcycle manufacturers have figured it out, most of all BMW. That
company should also build MTB, they know how it's done. Weight doesn't
always matter, especially not for many MTB riders. We just want less
wear and most importanly not have to clean and lube the chain every 50
miles.

It often takes the bicycle industry decades longer to figure something
out. Such as decent heavy-duty rack space on FS MTB and central-battery
powered lighting where, no surprise, I had to build it all myself. Beats
me why one still cannot buy this:

http://www.analogconsultants.com/ng/bike/Muddy5.JPG

It's lasted many thousand hard miles now which included heavy loads.
Yeah, that bike is heavy but it never breaks down anymore.


Given a choice I’d love a belt drive bike for the commute as I clock up
fairly respectable distances per day which does chew though the drive
chain.


I'd be careful ...

https://www.thelocal.se/20180524/ike...-lead-to-falls

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


Weight of an MTB doesn't matter? What a crock full of El Toro Poo Poo! Maybe weight doesn't matter in your world but it sure does to a LOT of other MTB users. I keep telling you Joerg; your best bet to get the durability that you say YOU need is to buy a small gasoline powered dirt motorcycle and convert it to pedal power. After all, weight doesn't matter to you.

Cheers
  #20  
Old April 25th 19, 10:16 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,800
Default Belt drive

On 2019-04-25 14:03, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Thursday, April 25, 2019 at 3:22:36 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-04-25 11:00, Roger Merriman wrote:
Joerg wrote:
On 2019-04-12 07:27, db wrote:
My son is set on getting a belt drive for the bike he is
building. What is good about them? You have to have the exact
length for your bike, and if it breaks, it is very expensive
to replace.

So, why?


Dad gave him too much money :-)

Now, a shaft drive, that would be great.


Imagine it would be much heavier and complicated, they have been
tried and used on MTB but don’t seem to have been cracked, I
think generally the extra weight/cost though a E-MTB would
mitigate that?


Motorcycle manufacturers have figured it out, most of all BMW.
That company should also build MTB, they know how it's done. Weight
doesn't always matter, especially not for many MTB riders. We just
want less wear and most importanly not have to clean and lube the
chain every 50 miles.

It often takes the bicycle industry decades longer to figure
something out. Such as decent heavy-duty rack space on FS MTB and
central-battery powered lighting where, no surprise, I had to build
it all myself. Beats me why one still cannot buy this:

http://www.analogconsultants.com/ng/bike/Muddy5.JPG

It's lasted many thousand hard miles now which included heavy
loads. Yeah, that bike is heavy but it never breaks down anymore.


Given a choice I’d love a belt drive bike for the commute as I
clock up fairly respectable distances per day which does chew
though the drive chain.


I'd be careful ...

https://www.thelocal.se/20180524/ike...-lead-to-falls



--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


Weight of an MTB doesn't matter? What a crock full of El Toro Poo
Poo! Maybe weight doesn't matter in your world but it sure does to a
LOT of other MTB users. I keep telling you Joerg; your best bet to
get the durability that you say YOU need is to buy a small gasoline
powered dirt motorcycle and convert it to pedal power. After all,
weight doesn't matter to you.


Within reason, of course. There are people who rather ride a bicycle
that weighs 10lbs more than customary but in contrast to others they
generally arrive at their destinations on time, due to a lack of
breakdowns. I happen to be one of those.

The only times during the last years (!) that I didn't arrive on time
were when I assisted others during repairs. Because they didn't have
thorn-resistant tubes et cetera.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 




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