A Cycling & bikes forum. CycleBanter.com

Go Back   Home » CycleBanter.com forum » Regional Cycling » Australia
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Cooked front pannier



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old February 16th 06, 01:30 AM posted to aus.bicycle
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cooked front pannier

I had the MTB/Commuter on the bike beak this
weekend along with my wife's bike. I've done it
plenty of times before but this time, my right
front pannier was too close to the exhaust. When
we got home, smell of burning plastic/rubber and
one wrecked pannier. There was a rag inside the
pannier which was badly scaled - it looked like it
could have caught fire. Note that this was from the
fumes, there was no contact with the exhaust pipe
itself.

Made me think about what other damage the exhaust
could do if aimed at the wrong part of a bike (tire,
alloy rim, paint anywhere. Will be more careful
in future and there is *no way* I'm putting the CF
road bike on a beak, ever.

DeF.

--
e-mail:
To reply, you'll have to remove finger.
Ads
  #2  
Old February 16th 06, 05:19 AM posted to aus.bicycle
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cooked front pannier


DeF wrote:

Made me think about what other damage the exhaust
could do if aimed at the wrong part of a bike (tire,
alloy rim, paint anywhere. Will be more careful
in future and there is *no way* I'm putting the CF
road bike on a beak, ever.


possible heat damage aside, I'd never clamp a CF bike around an area
that it's not meant to bear stresses. Ie: the top tube is not meant to
get crushed or deal with the stresses that it being fixed in the middle
will generate when you go over bumps etc. Keep it on the roof or
inside

  #3  
Old February 16th 06, 05:35 AM posted to aus.bicycle
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cooked front pannier

Bleve wrote:

DeF wrote:

Made me think about what other damage the exhaust
could do if aimed at the wrong part of a bike (tire,
alloy rim, paint anywhere. Will be more careful
in future and there is *no way* I'm putting the CF
road bike on a beak, ever.


possible heat damage aside, I'd never clamp a CF bike around an area
that it's not meant to bear stresses. Ie: the top tube is not meant to
get crushed or deal with the stresses that it being fixed in the middle
will generate when you go over bumps etc. Keep it on the roof or
inside


My bike travels inside the car, leaving me room for one passenger if I
keep the wheels on (yep, both, awesome hatch) or two passengers if I
take both wheels off. Any additional PAX get to sit on the roof ;-)

Tam
  #4  
Old February 16th 06, 06:48 AM posted to aus.bicycle
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cooked front pannier

Bleve wrote:
DeF wrote:

Made me think about what other damage the exhaust
could do if aimed at the wrong part of a bike (tire,
alloy rim, paint anywhere. Will be more careful
in future and there is *no way* I'm putting the CF
road bike on a beak, ever.


possible heat damage aside, I'd never clamp a CF bike around an area
that it's not meant to bear stresses. Ie: the top tube is not meant to
get crushed or deal with the stresses that it being fixed in the middle
will generate when you go over bumps etc. Keep it on the roof or
inside


I concur, the bike goes inside somehow, even if this means
taking both wheels off.

I don't like putting a bike on the roof. Once when I did this,
the driver of the car (not me) forgot and drove under a low
carport (before I could speak) catching the back of the seat
of the bike. The roof-rack was bent down into the roof of the
car (where the forks were attached) and the toe-clip holding the
rear wheel down snapped with a bang. Besides bent seat rails,
the bike was apparently unharmed by this.

Bike frames are amazingly strong. Another bike-laden car incident
involves bike on beak and speed humps. Car goes over bump too fast
(again, not me driving!), bike gets smashed into ground buckling
two wheels (no broken spokes) and scratching paint. The joins
on the rims moved so braking was ga-dunk-ga-dunk. The wheels were
never true again. No damage to the frame or forks though.

By the way, both bikes have steel frames.

It pains me to relive these traumatic events!

DeF

--
e-mail:
To reply, you'll have to remove finger.
  #5  
Old February 16th 06, 02:03 PM posted to aus.bicycle
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cooked front pannier

On 2006-02-16, cfsmtb (aka Bruce)
was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:

TimC Wrote:
Bikesoiler (haven't seen him around for a while?) told me when he was
putting my bike on the back of his car to always be alert to keep any
part of the bike well away from the exhaust path.


More like we haven't seen you around for awhile.


That is true. I haven't been keeping up my goat uptake committments,
have I?

Ask Pete S about
tandems & garages .....


Hey Pete S. What's this I hear about tandems & garages?

--
TimC
"How should I know if it works? That's what beta testers are for. I only
coded it." (Attributed to Linus Torvalds, somewhere in a posting)
  #7  
Old February 17th 06, 12:40 AM posted to aus.bicycle
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cooked front pannier


Thanks for the head up about the exhaut. It wasn't something I had even
contemplated but I will be aware now when I put the bikes on the rack.


--
SuzieB

  #8  
Old February 17th 06, 01:46 PM posted to aus.bicycle
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cooked front pannier


"TimC" wrote:
On 2006-02-16, cfsmtb (aka Bruce)
was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:


Ask Pete S about
tandems & garages .....


Hey Pete S. What's this I hear about tandems & garages?


'Twas a carport acksually. And that damn cat is lucky to still be in his
skin!

More? Oh, alright.

Travelling home from the 1999 Australia Day WE camp at Daylesford, with the
*old* tandem on its special roof rack. The rack mount above my head was even
squeaking on turns all the way home, so I was well aware of it. We turned
into the driveway and the cat was sitting there. Usually he moves away, but
he just sat there. I asked Margaret to get out and move him. Once the cat
was moved I reverted to autopilot and... drove.... under .. the.. CARPORT!!!

The rear hatch window shattered, raining broken glass all over the kids as
the very solid steel roof rack lifted at the front and smashed through. The
tandem (ooh, ooh, waaah!) was significantly shortened. Pretty much a write
off. Luckily a great second hand Trek tandem lande in Christies soon after,
and we bought that - $1800. Damage to the car - $2700. The insurance covered
that OK, but not the bike.

Now the tandem goes either on the roof bars lying flat, or it can be carried
on a tow bar bike-rack with the front wheel off. Roof carriers are just not
worth the grief.

Cheers
Peter


 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New bicycle idea Bob Marley General 49 October 7th 04 05:20 AM
Front brake shuddering! Bad wheels??? Pizza Man Mountain Biking 15 October 3rd 04 04:35 AM
Front brake shuddering. Bad Wheels? Pizza Man Techniques 29 October 2nd 04 06:45 PM
Trouble with a new Shimano Triple Front Derailleur FD-5504 Leon Techniques 8 May 12th 04 10:03 PM
Backwards front brake? Andrew Sweetman Techniques 3 March 23rd 04 02:07 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2021 CycleBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.