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  #21  
Old August 11th 18, 02:13 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,755
Default Flat repair

On 8/10/2018 6:07 PM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Fri, 10 Aug 2018 15:36:07 -0700 (PDT), jbeattie
wrote:

On Friday, August 10, 2018 at 12:33:29 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/10/2018 3:09 PM, David Scheidt wrote:
Andy wrote:

:I sanded the tube, applied the patch and clamped it in a vise for an hour.

Did you let the glue dry? the hexane (or whatever they use these
days) is just a solvent. the active part of the glue is the rubber
and vulcanizing activator. then put the
patch on, and press firm (the edge of a patch kit box works great.).
Then put the tube to use.

Here's my method:

First, I seldom patch a tube at the side of the road. Instead I just
change tubes, using the spare tube I always have with the bike. I do
check carefully by feel and visually to be sure the glass, wire or
whatever is not still sticking into the tire. Oh, and I make sure the
punctured tube is tossed sloppily into my handlebar bag so I don't
forget to deal with it at home.

At home, I inflate the tube and find the leak, making sure there isn't
more than one. I mark its position X with chalk.

I clamp a thick dowel (3/4" diameter or so) so it's protruding from my
bench vise. This is my work surface. I lay the X directly on top.

I take my sanding block (used for wood work) and sand the area to be
patched. It's way easier than fiddling with the tiny sandpaper in a
patch kit, and the dowel work surface makes it easy to sand well.

I apply the patch glue, spreading it thin, then wait maybe five minutes
for it to dry.

I peel the backing foil off the patch and carefully stick it in place.

Then I take another dowel, hold it right angles to the one in the vise,
and roll it over the patch to apply pressure, starting in the patch's
center and working toward the outside. It's like rolling cookie dough -
although I've never rolled cookie dough. This makes it easy to apply
quite a bit of force on a small area (the contact point between two
perpendicular cylinders) and I think helps make the bond very strong.

Then I make sure all the air is out of the tube so it's completely flat.
I fold it up, put a rubber band around it and put it back in my bike bag.

For me, the main thing is it's a lot easier to do this in my basement
where I have all the tools immediately ready. And the dowel in the vise
really is a much easier work surface than a flat surface.


Here's my technique -- carry a couple of spares and have boat loads of patched and new tubes at home. Get numerous flats and accumulate a pile of un-repaired tubes. Then, (1) select proper beer; go to man cave and (2) select proper DVD and or BluRay movie, (3) start patching. I use a Sharpie to mark, and I just lay the tube flat and sand. You can apply glue to two or three at a time, depending on chair-back hanging space. Number one dries as you're spreading glue on three, etc. Apply patches like you say, but I just put the tube back on flat surface (I use a plastic cutting board) and press down with plastic tire iron. You could use your finger nail. When the pile is done, I pump them all up and let them sit overnight. There are always two or three that go flat because of super small holes, and then I get out the bucket of water and do those, and then I roll them all up like you say.

Sanding is the important part, IMO. Some tube brands have really nasty mold release or some other finish that you have to get through for a good bond.

I have a patch limit where I just throw the tube away. Nothing set. If I say, "man there are a lot of patches on that tube," then I just throw it away. I've gotten my money out of it. I'll keep patching if it has sentimental value or its some weird size that I need.

-- Jay Beattie.



A while ago I believe that we discussed patching tubes in detail. At
the time I think I remember someone writing that they simply wiped the
tube off with some chemical and slapped on the patch. No sanding.

I remember thinking that I should "get some of that stuff" but like
many plans it came a crupper and I even forgot the incident until this
thread started.

Anyone remember the details and did the scheme actually work. I hate
sanding tubes and would gladly go to some lengths to avoid it.


Tech Products, a standard supplier to the auto/motorcycle
tire sold 'Tech Patch Buffer' solution which was
trichlorethane? trichlorethylene? I can't recall. Worked
well to clean and prep a patchable surface. Since we have
auto brake wash (mostly acetone and alcohol) I use that now.

This seems to be the new version in our bleak no-CFC world:
https://techtirerepairs.com/rubber-cleaners/

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Ads
  #22  
Old August 11th 18, 02:41 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
David Scheidt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,268
Default Flat repair

AMuzi wrote:
:On 8/10/2018 5:36 PM, jbeattie wrote:
: On Friday, August 10, 2018 at 12:33:29 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
: On 8/10/2018 3:09 PM, David Scheidt wrote:
: Andy wrote:

:-snip snip-

:I'll keep patching if it has sentimental value or its some
:weird size that I need.
:
: -- Jay Beattie.
:

:Huh.
:I thought I was as maladjusted and psychologically damaged
:as anyone on RBT, but I can't say I ever felt sentiment for
:a tube. YMMV of course.

I had a tube that was made in the month I was born. It had ~25
patches in it. Its demise, at age 35 or so, was a tire that should
have been replaced a few miles before it split down the middle of the
tread.



--
sig 24
  #23  
Old August 11th 18, 02:45 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
David Scheidt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,268
Default Flat repair

AMuzi wrote:
:On 8/10/2018 6:07 PM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
: On Fri, 10 Aug 2018 15:36:07 -0700 (PDT), jbeattie
: wrote:
:
: On Friday, August 10, 2018 at 12:33:29 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
: On 8/10/2018 3:09 PM, David Scheidt wrote:
: Andy wrote:
:
: :I sanded the tube, applied the patch and clamped it in a vise for an hour.
:
: Did you let the glue dry? the hexane (or whatever they use these
: days) is just a solvent. the active part of the glue is the rubber
: and vulcanizing activator. then put the
: patch on, and press firm (the edge of a patch kit box works great.).
: Then put the tube to use.
:
: Here's my method:
:
: First, I seldom patch a tube at the side of the road. Instead I just
: change tubes, using the spare tube I always have with the bike. I do
: check carefully by feel and visually to be sure the glass, wire or
: whatever is not still sticking into the tire. Oh, and I make sure the
: punctured tube is tossed sloppily into my handlebar bag so I don't
: forget to deal with it at home.
:
: At home, I inflate the tube and find the leak, making sure there isn't
: more than one. I mark its position X with chalk.
:
: I clamp a thick dowel (3/4" diameter or so) so it's protruding from my
: bench vise. This is my work surface. I lay the X directly on top.
:
: I take my sanding block (used for wood work) and sand the area to be
: patched. It's way easier than fiddling with the tiny sandpaper in a
: patch kit, and the dowel work surface makes it easy to sand well.
:
: I apply the patch glue, spreading it thin, then wait maybe five minutes
: for it to dry.
:
: I peel the backing foil off the patch and carefully stick it in place.
:
: Then I take another dowel, hold it right angles to the one in the vise,
: and roll it over the patch to apply pressure, starting in the patch's
: center and working toward the outside. It's like rolling cookie dough -
: although I've never rolled cookie dough. This makes it easy to apply
: quite a bit of force on a small area (the contact point between two
: perpendicular cylinders) and I think helps make the bond very strong.
:
: Then I make sure all the air is out of the tube so it's completely flat.
: I fold it up, put a rubber band around it and put it back in my bike bag.
:
: For me, the main thing is it's a lot easier to do this in my basement
: where I have all the tools immediately ready. And the dowel in the vise
: really is a much easier work surface than a flat surface.
:
: Here's my technique -- carry a couple of spares and have boat loads of patched and new tubes at home. Get numerous flats and accumulate a pile of un-repaired tubes. Then, (1) select proper beer; go to man cave and (2) select proper DVD and or BluRay movie, (3) start patching. I use a Sharpie to mark, and I just lay the tube flat and sand. You can apply glue to two or three at a time, depending on chair-back hanging space. Number one dries as you're spreading glue on three, etc. Apply patches like you say, but I just put the tube back on flat surface (I use a plastic cutting board) and press down with plastic tire iron. You could use your finger nail. When the pile is done, I pump them all up and let them sit overnight. There are always two or three that go flat because of super small holes, and then I get out the bucket of water and do those, and then I roll them all up like you say.
:
: Sanding is the important part, IMO. Some tube brands have really nasty mold release or some other finish that you have to get through for a good bond.
:
: I have a patch limit where I just throw the tube away. Nothing set. If I say, "man there are a lot of patches on that tube," then I just throw it away. I've gotten my money out of it. I'll keep patching if it has sentimental value or its some weird size that I need.
:
: -- Jay Beattie.
:
:
: A while ago I believe that we discussed patching tubes in detail. At
: the time I think I remember someone writing that they simply wiped the
: tube off with some chemical and slapped on the patch. No sanding.
:
: I remember thinking that I should "get some of that stuff" but like
: many plans it came a crupper and I even forgot the incident until this
: thread started.
:
: Anyone remember the details and did the scheme actually work. I hate
: sanding tubes and would gladly go to some lengths to avoid it.
:

:Tech Products, a standard supplier to the auto/motorcycle
:tire sold 'Tech Patch Buffer' solution which was
:trichlorethane? trichlorethylene? I can't recall. Worked
:well to clean and prep a patchable surface. Since we have
:auto brake wash (mostly acetone and alcohol) I use that now.

:This seems to be the new version in our bleak no-CFC world:
:https://techtirerepairs.com/rubber-cleaners/

Again, proper sanding increases the bond strength greatly.
I did a day long course on tire repair put on by Tech. One of their
samples was a repair done with a worn out tire buffer wheel vs one
done with a new one. The difference in tensile strength was ~50%, and
the good one fails in the patch, not the glued layer. I expect roll
off strength would be similarly reduced by just using a solvent.



--
sig 18
  #24  
Old August 11th 18, 03:32 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,418
Default Flat repair

On Friday, August 10, 2018 at 6:12:54 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/10/2018 6:07 PM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Fri, 10 Aug 2018 15:36:07 -0700 (PDT), jbeattie
wrote:

On Friday, August 10, 2018 at 12:33:29 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/10/2018 3:09 PM, David Scheidt wrote:
Andy wrote:

:I sanded the tube, applied the patch and clamped it in a vise for an hour.

Did you let the glue dry? the hexane (or whatever they use these
days) is just a solvent. the active part of the glue is the rubber
and vulcanizing activator. then put the
patch on, and press firm (the edge of a patch kit box works great.).
Then put the tube to use.

Here's my method:

First, I seldom patch a tube at the side of the road. Instead I just
change tubes, using the spare tube I always have with the bike. I do
check carefully by feel and visually to be sure the glass, wire or
whatever is not still sticking into the tire. Oh, and I make sure the
punctured tube is tossed sloppily into my handlebar bag so I don't
forget to deal with it at home.

At home, I inflate the tube and find the leak, making sure there isn't
more than one. I mark its position X with chalk.

I clamp a thick dowel (3/4" diameter or so) so it's protruding from my
bench vise. This is my work surface. I lay the X directly on top.

I take my sanding block (used for wood work) and sand the area to be
patched. It's way easier than fiddling with the tiny sandpaper in a
patch kit, and the dowel work surface makes it easy to sand well.

I apply the patch glue, spreading it thin, then wait maybe five minutes
for it to dry.

I peel the backing foil off the patch and carefully stick it in place..

Then I take another dowel, hold it right angles to the one in the vise,
and roll it over the patch to apply pressure, starting in the patch's
center and working toward the outside. It's like rolling cookie dough -
although I've never rolled cookie dough. This makes it easy to apply
quite a bit of force on a small area (the contact point between two
perpendicular cylinders) and I think helps make the bond very strong.

Then I make sure all the air is out of the tube so it's completely flat.
I fold it up, put a rubber band around it and put it back in my bike bag.

For me, the main thing is it's a lot easier to do this in my basement
where I have all the tools immediately ready. And the dowel in the vise
really is a much easier work surface than a flat surface.

Here's my technique -- carry a couple of spares and have boat loads of patched and new tubes at home. Get numerous flats and accumulate a pile of un-repaired tubes. Then, (1) select proper beer; go to man cave and (2) select proper DVD and or BluRay movie, (3) start patching. I use a Sharpie to mark, and I just lay the tube flat and sand. You can apply glue to two or three at a time, depending on chair-back hanging space. Number one dries as you're spreading glue on three, etc. Apply patches like you say, but I just put the tube back on flat surface (I use a plastic cutting board) and press down with plastic tire iron. You could use your finger nail. When the pile is done, I pump them all up and let them sit overnight. There are always two or three that go flat because of super small holes, and then I get out the bucket of water and do those, and then I roll them all up like you say.

Sanding is the important part, IMO. Some tube brands have really nasty mold release or some other finish that you have to get through for a good bond.

I have a patch limit where I just throw the tube away. Nothing set. If I say, "man there are a lot of patches on that tube," then I just throw it away. I've gotten my money out of it. I'll keep patching if it has sentimental value or its some weird size that I need.

-- Jay Beattie.



A while ago I believe that we discussed patching tubes in detail. At
the time I think I remember someone writing that they simply wiped the
tube off with some chemical and slapped on the patch. No sanding.

I remember thinking that I should "get some of that stuff" but like
many plans it came a crupper and I even forgot the incident until this
thread started.

Anyone remember the details and did the scheme actually work. I hate
sanding tubes and would gladly go to some lengths to avoid it.


Tech Products, a standard supplier to the auto/motorcycle
tire sold 'Tech Patch Buffer' solution which was
trichlorethane? trichlorethylene? I can't recall. Worked
well to clean and prep a patchable surface. Since we have
auto brake wash (mostly acetone and alcohol) I use that now.

This seems to be the new version in our bleak no-CFC world:
https://techtirerepairs.com/rubber-cleaners/


Do you sand at all, or is it straight chemical?

-- Jay Beattie.


  #25  
Old August 11th 18, 04:50 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
David Scheidt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,268
Default Flat repair

jbeattie wrote:
:On Friday, August 10, 2018 at 6:12:54 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
: On 8/10/2018 6:07 PM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
: On Fri, 10 Aug 2018 15:36:07 -0700 (PDT), jbeattie
: wrote:
:
: On Friday, August 10, 2018 at 12:33:29 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
: On 8/10/2018 3:09 PM, David Scheidt wrote:
: Andy wrote:
:
: :I sanded the tube, applied the patch and clamped it in a vise for an hour.
:
: Did you let the glue dry? the hexane (or whatever they use these
: days) is just a solvent. the active part of the glue is the rubber
: and vulcanizing activator. then put the
: patch on, and press firm (the edge of a patch kit box works great.).
: Then put the tube to use.
:
: Here's my method:
:
: First, I seldom patch a tube at the side of the road. Instead I just
: change tubes, using the spare tube I always have with the bike. I do
: check carefully by feel and visually to be sure the glass, wire or
: whatever is not still sticking into the tire. Oh, and I make sure the
: punctured tube is tossed sloppily into my handlebar bag so I don't
: forget to deal with it at home.
:
: At home, I inflate the tube and find the leak, making sure there isn't
: more than one. I mark its position X with chalk.
:
: I clamp a thick dowel (3/4" diameter or so) so it's protruding from my
: bench vise. This is my work surface. I lay the X directly on top.
:
: I take my sanding block (used for wood work) and sand the area to be
: patched. It's way easier than fiddling with the tiny sandpaper in a
: patch kit, and the dowel work surface makes it easy to sand well.
:
: I apply the patch glue, spreading it thin, then wait maybe five minutes
: for it to dry.
:
: I peel the backing foil off the patch and carefully stick it in place.
:
: Then I take another dowel, hold it right angles to the one in the vise,
: and roll it over the patch to apply pressure, starting in the patch's
: center and working toward the outside. It's like rolling cookie dough -
: although I've never rolled cookie dough. This makes it easy to apply
: quite a bit of force on a small area (the contact point between two
: perpendicular cylinders) and I think helps make the bond very strong.
:
: Then I make sure all the air is out of the tube so it's completely flat.
: I fold it up, put a rubber band around it and put it back in my bike bag.
:
: For me, the main thing is it's a lot easier to do this in my basement
: where I have all the tools immediately ready. And the dowel in the vise
: really is a much easier work surface than a flat surface.
:
: Here's my technique -- carry a couple of spares and have boat loads of patched and new tubes at home. Get numerous flats and accumulate a pile of un-repaired tubes. Then, (1) select proper beer; go to man cave and (2) select proper DVD and or BluRay movie, (3) start patching. I use a Sharpie to mark, and I just lay the tube flat and sand. You can apply glue to two or three at a time, depending on chair-back hanging space. Number one dries as you're spreading glue on three, etc. Apply patches like you say, but I just put the tube back on flat surface (I use a plastic cutting board) and press down with plastic tire iron. You could use your finger nail. When the pile is done, I pump them all up and let them sit overnight. There are always two or three that go flat because of super small holes, and then I get out the bucket of water and do those, and then I roll them all up like you say.
:
: Sanding is the important part, IMO. Some tube brands have really nasty mold release or some other finish that you have to get through for a good bond.
:
: I have a patch limit where I just throw the tube away. Nothing set. If I say, "man there are a lot of patches on that tube," then I just throw it away. I've gotten my money out of it. I'll keep patching if it has sentimental value or its some weird size that I need.
:
: -- Jay Beattie.
:
:
: A while ago I believe that we discussed patching tubes in detail. At
: the time I think I remember someone writing that they simply wiped the
: tube off with some chemical and slapped on the patch. No sanding.
:
: I remember thinking that I should "get some of that stuff" but like
: many plans it came a crupper and I even forgot the incident until this
: thread started.
:
: Anyone remember the details and did the scheme actually work. I hate
: sanding tubes and would gladly go to some lengths to avoid it.
:
:
: Tech Products, a standard supplier to the auto/motorcycle
: tire sold 'Tech Patch Buffer' solution which was
: trichlorethane? trichlorethylene? I can't recall. Worked
: well to clean and prep a patchable surface. Since we have
: auto brake wash (mostly acetone and alcohol) I use that now.
:
: This seems to be the new version in our bleak no-CFC world:
: https://techtirerepairs.com/rubber-cleaners/

o you sand at all, or is it straight chemical?

Tech says to buff.
https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...3xm84WdckWrqpB



--
This is a randomly numbered sig.
  #26  
Old August 11th 18, 05:36 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,906
Default Flat repair

On Fri, 10 Aug 2018 20:13:06 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

This seems to be the new version in our bleak no-CFC world:
https://techtirerepairs.com/rubber-cleaners/


http://apps.globalmsdslibrary.com/admin/pdf_service.php?target=https%3A%2F%2Fs3.amazonaws. com%2Fcompliance-plus-production-documents%2Fproduction%2Fmsds_scans_s53%2F179375_4 577c3a68954e30a4dd1dfe0f736b696.pdf
Light Aliphatic Naphtha 59.5 - 72%
N-Heptane 17 - 27%
Propane 7 - 10%
Isobutane 3 - 5%

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #27  
Old August 11th 18, 05:52 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 144
Default Flat repair

On Fri, 10 Aug 2018 20:13:06 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

On 8/10/2018 6:07 PM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Fri, 10 Aug 2018 15:36:07 -0700 (PDT), jbeattie
wrote:

On Friday, August 10, 2018 at 12:33:29 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/10/2018 3:09 PM, David Scheidt wrote:
Andy wrote:

:I sanded the tube, applied the patch and clamped it in a vise for an hour.

Did you let the glue dry? the hexane (or whatever they use these
days) is just a solvent. the active part of the glue is the rubber
and vulcanizing activator. then put the
patch on, and press firm (the edge of a patch kit box works great.).
Then put the tube to use.

Here's my method:

First, I seldom patch a tube at the side of the road. Instead I just
change tubes, using the spare tube I always have with the bike. I do
check carefully by feel and visually to be sure the glass, wire or
whatever is not still sticking into the tire. Oh, and I make sure the
punctured tube is tossed sloppily into my handlebar bag so I don't
forget to deal with it at home.

At home, I inflate the tube and find the leak, making sure there isn't
more than one. I mark its position X with chalk.

I clamp a thick dowel (3/4" diameter or so) so it's protruding from my
bench vise. This is my work surface. I lay the X directly on top.

I take my sanding block (used for wood work) and sand the area to be
patched. It's way easier than fiddling with the tiny sandpaper in a
patch kit, and the dowel work surface makes it easy to sand well.

I apply the patch glue, spreading it thin, then wait maybe five minutes
for it to dry.

I peel the backing foil off the patch and carefully stick it in place.

Then I take another dowel, hold it right angles to the one in the vise,
and roll it over the patch to apply pressure, starting in the patch's
center and working toward the outside. It's like rolling cookie dough -
although I've never rolled cookie dough. This makes it easy to apply
quite a bit of force on a small area (the contact point between two
perpendicular cylinders) and I think helps make the bond very strong.

Then I make sure all the air is out of the tube so it's completely flat.
I fold it up, put a rubber band around it and put it back in my bike bag.

For me, the main thing is it's a lot easier to do this in my basement
where I have all the tools immediately ready. And the dowel in the vise
really is a much easier work surface than a flat surface.

Here's my technique -- carry a couple of spares and have boat loads of patched and new tubes at home. Get numerous flats and accumulate a pile of un-repaired tubes. Then, (1) select proper beer; go to man cave and (2) select proper DVD and or BluRay movie, (3) start patching. I use a Sharpie to mark, and I just lay the tube flat and sand. You can apply glue to two or three at a time, depending on chair-back hanging space. Number one dries as you're spreading glue on three, etc. Apply patches like you say, but I just put the tube back on flat surface (I use a plastic cutting board) and press down with plastic tire iron. You could use your finger nail. When the pile is done, I pump them all up and let them sit overnight. There are always two or three that go flat because of super small holes, and then I get out the bucket of water and do those, and then I roll them all up like you say.

Sanding is the important part, IMO. Some tube brands have really nasty mold release or some other finish that you have to get through for a good bond.

I have a patch limit where I just throw the tube away. Nothing set. If I say, "man there are a lot of patches on that tube," then I just throw it away. I've gotten my money out of it. I'll keep patching if it has sentimental value or its some weird size that I need.

-- Jay Beattie.



A while ago I believe that we discussed patching tubes in detail. At
the time I think I remember someone writing that they simply wiped the
tube off with some chemical and slapped on the patch. No sanding.

I remember thinking that I should "get some of that stuff" but like
many plans it came a crupper and I even forgot the incident until this
thread started.

Anyone remember the details and did the scheme actually work. I hate
sanding tubes and would gladly go to some lengths to avoid it.


Tech Products, a standard supplier to the auto/motorcycle
tire sold 'Tech Patch Buffer' solution which was
trichlorethane? trichlorethylene? I can't recall. Worked
well to clean and prep a patchable surface. Since we have
auto brake wash (mostly acetone and alcohol) I use that now.

I assume that "auto brake wash" is a different product then "brake
cleaner" which, here, is a pretty aggressive cleaning liquid.


This seems to be the new version in our bleak no-CFC world:
https://techtirerepairs.com/rubber-cleaners/

  #28  
Old August 11th 18, 06:06 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 144
Default Flat repair

On Fri, 10 Aug 2018 21:36:20 -0700, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:

On Fri, 10 Aug 2018 20:13:06 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

This seems to be the new version in our bleak no-CFC world:
https://techtirerepairs.com/rubber-cleaners/


http://apps.globalmsdslibrary.com/admin/pdf_service.php?target=https%3A%2F%2Fs3.amazonaws. com%2Fcompliance-plus-production-documents%2Fproduction%2Fmsds_scans_s53%2F179375_4 577c3a68954e30a4dd1dfe0f736b696.pdf
Light Aliphatic Naphtha 59.5 - 72%
N-Heptane 17 - 27%
Propane 7 - 10%
Isobutane 3 - 5%


I assume that the Propane and Isobutane are "propellants" as they both
are in their gaseous form at normal temperatures. Propane @ -42C and
Isobutane at -11.7C.


  #29  
Old August 11th 18, 06:56 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 283
Default Flat repair

On Saturday, August 11, 2018 at 1:07:58 AM UTC+2, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Fri, 10 Aug 2018 15:36:07 -0700 (PDT), jbeattie
wrote:

On Friday, August 10, 2018 at 12:33:29 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/10/2018 3:09 PM, David Scheidt wrote:
Andy wrote:

:I sanded the tube, applied the patch and clamped it in a vise for an hour.

Did you let the glue dry? the hexane (or whatever they use these
days) is just a solvent. the active part of the glue is the rubber
and vulcanizing activator. then put the
patch on, and press firm (the edge of a patch kit box works great.).
Then put the tube to use.

Here's my method:

First, I seldom patch a tube at the side of the road. Instead I just
change tubes, using the spare tube I always have with the bike. I do
check carefully by feel and visually to be sure the glass, wire or
whatever is not still sticking into the tire. Oh, and I make sure the
punctured tube is tossed sloppily into my handlebar bag so I don't
forget to deal with it at home.

At home, I inflate the tube and find the leak, making sure there isn't
more than one. I mark its position X with chalk.

I clamp a thick dowel (3/4" diameter or so) so it's protruding from my
bench vise. This is my work surface. I lay the X directly on top.

I take my sanding block (used for wood work) and sand the area to be
patched. It's way easier than fiddling with the tiny sandpaper in a
patch kit, and the dowel work surface makes it easy to sand well.

I apply the patch glue, spreading it thin, then wait maybe five minutes
for it to dry.

I peel the backing foil off the patch and carefully stick it in place.

Then I take another dowel, hold it right angles to the one in the vise,
and roll it over the patch to apply pressure, starting in the patch's
center and working toward the outside. It's like rolling cookie dough -
although I've never rolled cookie dough. This makes it easy to apply
quite a bit of force on a small area (the contact point between two
perpendicular cylinders) and I think helps make the bond very strong.

Then I make sure all the air is out of the tube so it's completely flat.
I fold it up, put a rubber band around it and put it back in my bike bag.

For me, the main thing is it's a lot easier to do this in my basement
where I have all the tools immediately ready. And the dowel in the vise
really is a much easier work surface than a flat surface.


Here's my technique -- carry a couple of spares and have boat loads of patched and new tubes at home. Get numerous flats and accumulate a pile of un-repaired tubes. Then, (1) select proper beer; go to man cave and (2) select proper DVD and or BluRay movie, (3) start patching. I use a Sharpie to mark, and I just lay the tube flat and sand. You can apply glue to two or three at a time, depending on chair-back hanging space. Number one dries as you're spreading glue on three, etc. Apply patches like you say, but I just put the tube back on flat surface (I use a plastic cutting board) and press down with plastic tire iron. You could use your finger nail. When the pile is done, I pump them all up and let them sit overnight. There are always two or three that go flat because of super small holes, and then I get out the bucket of water and do those, and then I roll them all up like you say.

Sanding is the important part, IMO. Some tube brands have really nasty mold release or some other finish that you have to get through for a good bond.

I have a patch limit where I just throw the tube away. Nothing set. If I say, "man there are a lot of patches on that tube," then I just throw it away. I've gotten my money out of it. I'll keep patching if it has sentimental value or its some weird size that I need.

-- Jay Beattie.



A while ago I believe that we discussed patching tubes in detail. At
the time I think I remember someone writing that they simply wiped the
tube off with some chemical and slapped on the patch. No sanding.

I remember thinking that I should "get some of that stuff" but like
many plans it came a crupper and I even forgot the incident until this
thread started.

Anyone remember the details and did the scheme actually work. I hate
sanding tubes and would gladly go to some lengths to avoid it.


It was me. I never sand unless I need to patch a flat along the road which is almost never. I use what we call in the Netherlands 'wasbenzine'. Removes the mould release nicely and you get a nice dull black spot. It takes just seconds and I get 100% succes rate.

Lou
  #30  
Old August 11th 18, 08:14 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sepp Ruf
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 217
Default Flat repair

David Scheid wrote:
AMuzi wrote:
:On 8/10/2018 5:36 PM, jbeattie wrote:


:I'll keep patching if it has sentimental value or its some
:weird size that I need.
:
: -- Jay Beattie.
:

:Huh.
:I thought I was as maladjusted and psychologically damaged
:as anyone on RBT, but I can't say I ever felt sentiment for
:a tube. YMMV of course.

I had a tube that was made in the month I was born. It had ~25
patches in it. Its demise, at age 35 or so, was a tire that should
have been replaced a few miles before it split down the middle of the
tread.


Oh, what horrible loss! More triggering than those last-second appendectomy
stories! Was there no way to at least save the the date stamp by cutting
it out and turning it into a new patch?
 




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