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Who Wants Motor Vehicles Cluttering Up the Driveway Anyway? It JustForces Cyclists Onto the Grass!



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 19th 16, 06:52 AM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Bret Cahill
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Posts: 825
Default Who Wants Motor Vehicles Cluttering Up the Driveway Anyway? It JustForces Cyclists Onto the Grass!

Commuters buy and insure motor vehicles and with such a yuge capital/overhead cost they feel compelled to throw good money after bad by driving all the time.

But why buy when it's cheaper to rent for the occasional motor trip and cycle the rest of the time?

This will free up a lot of road space for cyclists:

https://www.yahoo.com/news/uber-auto...70.html?ref=gs


Bret Cahill


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  #2  
Old August 19th 16, 09:01 AM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Alycidon
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Posts: 3,921
Default Who Wants Motor Vehicles Cluttering Up the Driveway Anyway? ItJust Forces Cyclists Onto the Grass!

On Friday, 19 August 2016 06:52:22 UTC+1, Bret Cahill wrote:
Commuters buy and insure motor vehicles and with such a yuge capital/overhead cost they feel compelled to throw good money after bad by driving all the time.

But why buy when it's cheaper to rent for the occasional motor trip and cycle the rest of the time?

This will free up a lot of road space for cyclists:

https://www.yahoo.com/news/uber-auto...70.html?ref=gs


Bret Cahill


It will also put an end to speeding, tailgating and drivers being killed by taking bends too fast.

Win win.
  #3  
Old August 19th 16, 09:13 AM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Bod[_5_]
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Posts: 3,510
Default Who Wants Motor Vehicles Cluttering Up the Driveway Anyway? ItJust Forces Cyclists Onto the Grass!

On 19/08/2016 09:01, Alycidon wrote:
On Friday, 19 August 2016 06:52:22 UTC+1, Bret Cahill wrote:
Commuters buy and insure motor vehicles and with such a yuge capital/overhead cost they feel compelled to throw good money after bad by driving all the time.

But why buy when it's cheaper to rent for the occasional motor trip and cycle the rest of the time?

This will free up a lot of road space for cyclists:

https://www.yahoo.com/news/uber-auto...70.html?ref=gs


Bret Cahill


It will also put an end to speeding, tailgating and drivers being killed by taking bends too fast.

Win win.

Plus improve the fitness and health of many sedentary motorists.
  #4  
Old August 19th 16, 10:07 AM posted to uk.rec.cycling
jnugent
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Posts: 11,574
Default Who Wants Motor Vehicles Cluttering Up the Driveway Anyway? ItJust Forces Cyclists Onto the Grass!

On 19/08/2016 06:52, Bret Cahill wrote:

Commuters buy and insure motor vehicles and with such a yuge capital/overhead cost they feel compelled to throw good money after bad by driving all the time.


But why buy when it's cheaper to rent for the occasional motor trip and cycle the rest of the time?


And why buy a nice house in a decent suburb when it's cheaper to rent a
flea-pit in a high-crime inner-city area with druggies both sides and a
high probability of you and your family becoming victims?

And why pay tens of thousands for a fitted kitchen with high-end
appliances, storage units and food preparation areas when it's cheaper
to buy take-aways and chew at them between drags at your cigarettes?

This will free up a lot of road space for cyclists:


https://www.yahoo.com/news/uber-auto...70.html?ref=gs


It will not catch on, any more than zip-bikes would. When it comes to
car-share (with the constant attendant risk of a vehicle not being
available when and where you need it) only trendies intent on
conspicuous piousness are interested. Normal people aren't.

Vehicles have to be available all the time, every day. That is so
whether the vehicle is a £100,000 luxury car or a £200 bicycle.
Immediacy of use (without bneeding the permission of others for each
journey) is a key feature of the utility required.

  #5  
Old August 21st 16, 05:39 AM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Bret Cahill
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Posts: 825
Default Who Wants Motor Vehicles Cluttering Up the Driveway Anyway? ItJust Forces Cyclists Onto the Grass!

Commuters buy and insure motor vehicles and with such a yuge capital/overhead cost they feel compelled to throw good money after bad by driving all the time.

But why buy when it's cheaper to rent for the occasional motor trip and cycle the rest of the time?


And why buy a nice house in a decent suburb when it's cheaper to rent a
flea-pit in a high-crime inner-city area with druggies both sides and a
high probability of you and your family becoming victims?

And why pay tens of thousands for a fitted kitchen with high-end
appliances, storage units and food preparation areas when it's cheaper
to buy take-aways and chew at them between drags at your cigarettes?

This will free up a lot of road space for cyclists:


https://www.yahoo.com/news/uber-auto...70.html?ref=gs


It will not catch on, any more than zip-bikes would. When it comes to
car-share (with the constant attendant risk of a vehicle not being
available when and where you need it) only trendies intent on
conspicuous piousness are interested. Normal people aren't.

Vehicles have to be available all the time, every day. That is so
whether the vehicle is a £100,000 luxury car or a £200 bicycle.
Immediacy of use (without bneeding the permission of others for each
journey) is a key feature of the utility required.


Most people with normal 9 to 5 jobs and weekend activities generally have hours or days to plan a trip.

When you need something quick, i.e., a lime or onion, cycle to the corner market.

One additional advantage is motorists can select the vehicle that matches the trip.



  #6  
Old August 21st 16, 06:01 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling,uk.transport
jnugent
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Posts: 11,574
Default Who Wants Motor Vehicles Cluttering Up the Driveway Anyway? ItJust Forces Cyclists Onto the Grass!

On 21/08/2016 05:39, Bret Cahill wrote:

Commuters buy and insure motor vehicles and with such a yuge capital/overhead cost they feel compelled to throw good money after bad by driving all the time.
But why buy when it's cheaper to rent for the occasional motor trip and cycle the rest of the time?


And why buy a nice house in a decent suburb when it's cheaper to rent a
flea-pit in a high-crime inner-city area with druggies both sides and a
high probability of you and your family becoming victims?


Oh... no answer to that one?

It must be Completely Different [TM].

And why pay tens of thousands for a fitted kitchen with high-end
appliances, storage units and food preparation areas when it's cheaper
to buy take-aways and chew at them between drags at your cigarettes?


Or to that one.

This will free up a lot of road space for cyclists:


https://www.yahoo.com/news/uber-auto...70.html?ref=gs


It will not catch on, any more than zip-bikes would. When it comes to
car-share (with the constant attendant risk of a vehicle not being
available when and where you need it) only trendies intent on
conspicuous piousness are interested. Normal people aren't.


Vehicles have to be available all the time, every day. That is so
whether the vehicle is a £100,000 luxury car or a £200 bicycle.
Immediacy of use (without bneeding the permission of others for each
journey) is a key feature of the utility required.


Most people with normal 9 to 5 jobs and weekend activities generally have hours or days to plan a trip.
When you need something quick, i.e., a lime or onion, cycle to the corner market.
One additional advantage is motorists can select the vehicle that matches the trip.


Do you ever actually hire (rent) cars?
  #7  
Old August 21st 16, 06:57 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling,uk.transport
NY
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Posts: 34
Default Who Wants Motor Vehicles Cluttering Up the Driveway Anyway? It Just Forces Cyclists Onto the Grass!

"JNugent" wrote in message
...
On 21/08/2016 05:39, Bret Cahill wrote:
Most people with normal 9 to 5 jobs and weekend activities generally have
hours or days to plan a trip.


But do they want to *have* to plan the trip, as opposed to being able to
decide on the spur of the moment when/if/where to go, dependent on factors
such as the weather.

When you need something quick, i.e., a lime or onion, cycle to the corner
market.


Er, which corner market is that? You evidently live in a town where there
are such things. I live in a large village but the only shop that it has is
(currently) a cafe that is open mainly for the benefit of walkers; I don't
think it even sells essential commodities such as a loaf of bread or a pint
of milk in its latest incarnation. It used to be a post office and general
store until shortly before we moved there and since then has gone through
three different incarnations as various types of cafe.

The nearest convenience store is in the nearest town, about 10 minutes'
drive away, and it's probably about as quick to get to the full-size
supermarket in the centre of town, since there are no shops on the road into
town approaching from my direction so to get to a convenience store (eg
Londis) I'd have to go almost all the way in and then part of the way back
out in another direction.

There is a half-hourly bus service which is as fast as a car once you're on
the main road, but about 15 mins to walk to the main road in the first
place. There's also an occasional bus that stops right outside our house and
goes into town, but via a *very* tortuous route. I think the only people who
use it are the infirm who can't walk to the main road for the fast service.

The main road is too busy and dangerous with traffic to/from the coast to
cycle along (only a very small amount of it has a cycle track or pavement
alongside of it). There is a back road which is quieter (though being
narrower it's probably not much safer) and it's probably about twice as far.
[Actually, I've just checked on GMap Pedometer site and it's only about 1/10
mile longer - but there several nasty hills.]

Not having an "essentials" shop is a real nuisance on rare occasions, though
normally I combine driving into town for shopping with going in for other
reasons (eg going to bank to pay in cheques or going to tip to take garden
rubbish or going swimming).


A few years ago I had to stop driving for several months for health reasons
until I got the all-clear from the consultant, so I got very used to walking
out to the main road to get the bus either into the nearby town to the
doctor's surgery or else the opposite way into the city for hospital
appointments. Luckily it didn't take long after being discharged form
hospital until I was up to the walk to/from the bus stop.

It's a shame that the nearest shop is too far to go by bike, because I might
well cycle rather than driving if I only needed a few items that would fit
in a rucksack. But 8 miles each way is a bit too far and I'd be a sweaty
wreck by the time I got there - once you stop at the other end there's no
longer any cooling breeze!

  #8  
Old August 21st 16, 07:53 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
James Wilkinson
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Posts: 746
Default Who Wants Motor Vehicles Cluttering Up the Driveway Anyway? ItJust Forces Cyclists Onto the Grass!

On Fri, 19 Aug 2016 09:13:20 +0100, Bod wrote:

On 19/08/2016 09:01, Alycidon wrote:
On Friday, 19 August 2016 06:52:22 UTC+1, Bret Cahill wrote:
Commuters buy and insure motor vehicles and with such a yuge capital/overhead cost they feel compelled to throw good money after bad by driving all the time.

But why buy when it's cheaper to rent for the occasional motor trip and cycle the rest of the time?

This will free up a lot of road space for cyclists:

https://www.yahoo.com/news/uber-auto...70.html?ref=gs


Bret Cahill


It will also put an end to speeding, tailgating and drivers being killed by taking bends too fast.

Win win.

Plus improve the fitness and health of many sedentary motorists.


Not if they sprain things or fall off.

--
If a person with multiple personalities threatens suicide, is that person considered a hostage situation?
  #9  
Old August 21st 16, 08:47 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling,uk.transport
jnugent
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Posts: 11,574
Default Who Wants Motor Vehicles Cluttering Up the Driveway Anyway? ItJust Forces Cyclists Onto the Grass!

On 21/08/2016 18:57, NY wrote:
"JNugent" wrote in message
...
On 21/08/2016 05:39, Bret Cahill wrote:
Most people with normal 9 to 5 jobs and weekend activities generally
have hours or days to plan a trip.


But do they want to *have* to plan the trip, as opposed to being able to
decide on the spur of the moment when/if/where to go, dependent on
factors such as the weather.

When you need something quick, i.e., a lime or onion, cycle to the
corner market.


Er, which corner market is that? You evidently live in a town where
there are such things. I live in a large village but the only shop that
it has is (currently) a cafe that is open mainly for the benefit of
walkers; I don't think it even sells essential commodities such as a
loaf of bread or a pint of milk in its latest incarnation. It used to be
a post office and general store until shortly before we moved there and
since then has gone through three different incarnations as various
types of cafe.

The nearest convenience store is in the nearest town, about 10 minutes'
drive away, and it's probably about as quick to get to the full-size
supermarket in the centre of town, since there are no shops on the road
into town approaching from my direction so to get to a convenience store
(eg Londis) I'd have to go almost all the way in and then part of the
way back out in another direction.

There is a half-hourly bus service which is as fast as a car once you're
on the main road, but about 15 mins to walk to the main road in the
first place. There's also an occasional bus that stops right outside our
house and goes into town, but via a *very* tortuous route. I think the
only people who use it are the infirm who can't walk to the main road
for the fast service.

The main road is too busy and dangerous with traffic to/from the coast
to cycle along (only a very small amount of it has a cycle track or
pavement alongside of it). There is a back road which is quieter (though
being narrower it's probably not much safer) and it's probably about
twice as far. [Actually, I've just checked on GMap Pedometer site and
it's only about 1/10 mile longer - but there several nasty hills.]

Not having an "essentials" shop is a real nuisance on rare occasions,
though normally I combine driving into town for shopping with going in
for other reasons (eg going to bank to pay in cheques or going to tip to
take garden rubbish or going swimming).


A few years ago I had to stop driving for several months for health
reasons until I got the all-clear from the consultant, so I got very
used to walking out to the main road to get the bus either into the
nearby town to the doctor's surgery or else the opposite way into the
city for hospital appointments. Luckily it didn't take long after being
discharged form hospital until I was up to the walk to/from the bus stop.

It's a shame that the nearest shop is too far to go by bike, because I
might well cycle rather than driving if I only needed a few items that
would fit in a rucksack. But 8 miles each way is a bit too far and I'd
be a sweaty wreck by the time I got there - once you stop at the other
end there's no longer any cooling breeze!


None of this is remotely possible.

Ask any cyclist.

In Cyclist World, every journey is either do-able by bike OR is so
unimportant that it doesn't matter if you have to arrange it weeks in
advance.
  #10  
Old August 21st 16, 10:42 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Bret Cahill
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 825
Default Who Wants Motor Vehicles Cluttering Up the Driveway Anyway? ItJust Forces Cyclists Onto the Grass!

Commuters buy and insure motor vehicles and with such a yuge capital/overhead cost they feel compelled to throw good money after bad by driving all the time.
But why buy when it's cheaper to rent for the occasional motor trip and cycle the rest of the time?


And why buy a nice house in a decent suburb when it's cheaper to rent a
flea-pit in a high-crime inner-city area with druggies both sides and a
high probability of you and your family becoming victims?


Oh... no answer to that one?


It must be Completely Different [TM].


And why pay tens of thousands for a fitted kitchen with high-end
appliances, storage units and food preparation areas when it's cheaper
to buy take-aways and chew at them between drags at your cigarettes?


Or to that one.


This will free up a lot of road space for cyclists:


https://www.yahoo.com/news/uber-auto...0..html?ref=gs


It will not catch on, any more than zip-bikes would. When it comes to
car-share (with the constant attendant risk of a vehicle not being
available when and where you need it) only trendies intent on
conspicuous piousness are interested. Normal people aren't.


Vehicles have to be available all the time, every day. That is so
whether the vehicle is a £100,000 luxury car or a £200 bicycle.
Immediacy of use (without bneeding the permission of others for each
journey) is a key feature of the utility required.


Most people with normal 9 to 5 jobs and weekend activities generally have hours or days to plan a trip.
When you need something quick, i.e., a lime or onion, cycle to the corner market.
One additional advantage is motorists can select the vehicle that matches the trip.


Do you ever actually hire (rent) cars?


Not yet but everyone must always look at the bottom line.

Without the overhead cost of insurance and financing the vehicle, it makes cents to rent.

The amount of money poor people waste on motor vehicles is absolutely insane. Taxis and rentals can do a lot of good clearing cars out of driveways, garages and off the street.


Bret Cahill

 




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