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Training for Power



 
 
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  #11  
Old December 30th 19, 01:31 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
jOHN b.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,722
Default Training for Power

On Sun, 29 Dec 2019 11:29:32 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 12/29/2019 2:50 AM, wrote:
On Saturday, December 28, 2019 at 1:23:54 AM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
As I probably misplaced in Andre's string, I have decided to train in the winter for power. I can't remember doing this before but I must have done so.

I had a couple of toutes that are between 20 and 30 miles and I do a fast first half. Stop for coffee and donut and then a fast return. 24 miles ends up being about 2 hours with the stop.

When I started a couple of weeks ago I was averaging between 11 and 11.5 mph. Yesterday I was a git sore from Tuesday so I tried to take it a little easier. Tuesday's average was 14 mph and Thursday's was 14,75. There are a couple of rises that I was slowing down on and I'm not slowing down nearly as much now.

So let's see how this winter progresses and then when the weather improves I'll do some endurance rides since early April is a century. Last August my younger brother dropped me like the layer of dust on his bike. But he ran out of steam 10 miles from the end. But that ain't the way he tells it.

So, lets see how it goes.


If you want training for power you have to do that with a power meter so you know what you are doing. Average speed is not a good indicator especially when traffic lights are involved. If you just want to train (for what?) more effective than I agree short rides with higher intensities followed by enough recovery time are the way to go. Long boring rides with constant and low intensities are something from the past. For training that is except for PBP of course.


I agree with the high intensities vs. long, low intensities. But in the
past I was able to do that without a power meter.

My speed capability increased most significantly after I moved to a
place where my ride home from work included a couple miles of mandatory
uphill. I attacked the hill as a challenge, hurting myself to keep my
speed up. And after a few years I was quite a bit faster.

On the other hand, when we did 4000 miles coast to coast, we didn't
push, we cruised. My wife was hopeful that on our return she'd be able
to keep up with faster club rides, but the long ride seemed to make no
difference. I think it's because she never pushed herself to the point
of pain.

Vaguely related, I recently read an article about weight lifting for
strength training. It addressed the question of whether it's better to
do lower weights with lots of repetitions, or heavier weights with fewer
repetitions. The article claimed that recent studies show it doesn't
matter - that as long as you work a muscle to the point where you can't
do one more repetition, you get the same strength benefit. The key is
pushing yourself to exhaustion. Without that, there's little or no
strength gain.


It is a bit more complicated as that. The current recommendation for
building muscle mass is many repetitions while to build strength
fewer repetitions are recommended.
see
https://www.builtlean.com/2012/07/19...s-vs-low-reps/
The weights lifted of course are commensurate with the number of
repetitions, probably 80 - 90% of your single lift weight for the low
repetitions work.
--
cheers,

John B.

Ads
  #12  
Old December 30th 19, 10:31 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 700
Default Training for Power

On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 1:30:19 AM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 1:23:31 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 7:32:31 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 9:53:48 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 6:25:29 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Saturday, December 28, 2019 at 11:50:06 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Saturday, December 28, 2019 at 1:23:54 AM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
As I probably misplaced in Andre's string, I have decided to train in the winter for power. I can't remember doing this before but I must have done so.

I had a couple of toutes that are between 20 and 30 miles and I do a fast first half. Stop for coffee and donut and then a fast return. 24 miles ends up being about 2 hours with the stop.

When I started a couple of weeks ago I was averaging between 11 and 11.5 mph. Yesterday I was a git sore from Tuesday so I tried to take it a little easier. Tuesday's average was 14 mph and Thursday's was 14,75. There are a couple of rises that I was slowing down on and I'm not slowing down nearly as much now.

So let's see how this winter progresses and then when the weather improves I'll do some endurance rides since early April is a century. Last August my younger brother dropped me like the layer of dust on his bike. But he ran out of steam 10 miles from the end. But that ain't the way he tells it.

So, lets see how it goes.

If you want training for power you have to do that with a power meter so you know what you are doing. Average speed is not a good indicator especially when traffic lights are involved. If you just want to train (for what?) more effective than I agree short rides with higher intensities followed by enough recovery time are the way to go. Long boring rides with constant and low intensities are something from the past. For training that is except for PBP of course.

Lou

I absolutely disagree with the idea of power meters. Even the pros are stopping using those things.

What do you disagree with? Pros stopping with power meters? For training? Absolute nonsense.

Lou


Pros usually do not ride with power meters anymore. You use them when testing for TT's so that you know how much power you can put out for the length and difficulty of the course. Eneos was using them to monitor climbing power. The problem with this is that you have to go with the breaks so all your plans go out the window. So about all they are using them for is lab work and TT's.



A power meter is a trainings device and all pro riders use one. A race is a race and it is rue that you have to ride in the red zone to win a race or stage, but the majority of the riders ride a race with a power meter at least to analyse the data afterwards or do you think all the Garmin head units you see on their bikes are for following the route? . GC riders use de data of the power meters during the race because for them it is 3 weeks race to win.

Lou


https://cyclinguphill.com/pros-and-c...-power-meters/

I can't find the article now - they blamed the Tour loss of Froome on his power meter and that riders were stopping using power meters except in TT's


What kind of nonsense is that? Did the power meter slowed hime down? Chris Froome won 4 Tours, 1 Giro d'Italia and 2 Vuelta's because he used a power meter. The Giro stage where he beat Tom Dumoulin was because of a fine team tactic/plan and he knew exactly what he was doing. Tom Dumoulin lost that Giro because he was not confident of his ability and waited on the downhill of the Colle Delle Finestre for some help from other riders. He should just have trusted his power meter on a man to man fight with Froome. Maybe he did but in the previous days he was better than Froome.

Most of the times the criticism of the use of power meters (and communication) don't come from the riders (except Nikki Terpstra maybe) or staff but from the audience/spectators who think races become predictable and boring. They like to see the riders attack all the time like a headless chicken and then competely collapse 5 km before the finish. That is easy to say sitting in front of the TV with a beer.

Lou
  #13  
Old December 30th 19, 07:00 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,231
Default Training for Power

On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 1:31:56 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 1:30:19 AM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 1:23:31 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 7:32:31 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 9:53:48 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 6:25:29 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Saturday, December 28, 2019 at 11:50:06 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Saturday, December 28, 2019 at 1:23:54 AM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
As I probably misplaced in Andre's string, I have decided to train in the winter for power. I can't remember doing this before but I must have done so.

I had a couple of toutes that are between 20 and 30 miles and I do a fast first half. Stop for coffee and donut and then a fast return.. 24 miles ends up being about 2 hours with the stop.

When I started a couple of weeks ago I was averaging between 11 and 11.5 mph. Yesterday I was a git sore from Tuesday so I tried to take it a little easier. Tuesday's average was 14 mph and Thursday's was 14,75. There are a couple of rises that I was slowing down on and I'm not slowing down nearly as much now.

So let's see how this winter progresses and then when the weather improves I'll do some endurance rides since early April is a century.. Last August my younger brother dropped me like the layer of dust on his bike. But he ran out of steam 10 miles from the end. But that ain't the way he tells it.

So, lets see how it goes.

If you want training for power you have to do that with a power meter so you know what you are doing. Average speed is not a good indicator especially when traffic lights are involved. If you just want to train (for what?) more effective than I agree short rides with higher intensities followed by enough recovery time are the way to go. Long boring rides with constant and low intensities are something from the past. For training that is except for PBP of course.

Lou

I absolutely disagree with the idea of power meters. Even the pros are stopping using those things.

What do you disagree with? Pros stopping with power meters? For training? Absolute nonsense.

Lou


Pros usually do not ride with power meters anymore. You use them when testing for TT's so that you know how much power you can put out for the length and difficulty of the course. Eneos was using them to monitor climbing power. The problem with this is that you have to go with the breaks so all your plans go out the window. So about all they are using them for is lab work and TT's.


A power meter is a trainings device and all pro riders use one. A race is a race and it is rue that you have to ride in the red zone to win a race or stage, but the majority of the riders ride a race with a power meter at least to analyse the data afterwards or do you think all the Garmin head units you see on their bikes are for following the route? . GC riders use de data of the power meters during the race because for them it is 3 weeks race to win.

Lou


https://cyclinguphill.com/pros-and-c...-power-meters/

I can't find the article now - they blamed the Tour loss of Froome on his power meter and that riders were stopping using power meters except in TT's


What kind of nonsense is that? Did the power meter slowed hime down? Chris Froome won 4 Tours, 1 Giro d'Italia and 2 Vuelta's because he used a power meter. The Giro stage where he beat Tom Dumoulin was because of a fine team tactic/plan and he knew exactly what he was doing. Tom Dumoulin lost that Giro because he was not confident of his ability and waited on the downhill of the Colle Delle Finestre for some help from other riders. He should just have trusted his power meter on a man to man fight with Froome. Maybe he did but in the previous days he was better than Froome.

Most of the times the criticism of the use of power meters (and communication) don't come from the riders (except Nikki Terpstra maybe) or staff but from the audience/spectators who think races become predictable and boring.. They like to see the riders attack all the time like a headless chicken and then competely collapse 5 km before the finish. That is easy to say sitting in front of the TV with a beer.

Lou


Chris Froome was riding at his near max while being pulled up the mountain by is team. That meant he burned out his team and was at his near max power output himself. So he didn't have the punch when he needed it.
  #14  
Old December 31st 19, 12:06 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 700
Default Training for Power

On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 7:00:24 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 1:31:56 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 1:30:19 AM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 1:23:31 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 7:32:31 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 9:53:48 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 6:25:29 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Saturday, December 28, 2019 at 11:50:06 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Saturday, December 28, 2019 at 1:23:54 AM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
As I probably misplaced in Andre's string, I have decided to train in the winter for power. I can't remember doing this before but I must have done so.

I had a couple of toutes that are between 20 and 30 miles and I do a fast first half. Stop for coffee and donut and then a fast return. 24 miles ends up being about 2 hours with the stop.

When I started a couple of weeks ago I was averaging between 11 and 11.5 mph. Yesterday I was a git sore from Tuesday so I tried to take it a little easier. Tuesday's average was 14 mph and Thursday's was 14,75. There are a couple of rises that I was slowing down on and I'm not slowing down nearly as much now.

So let's see how this winter progresses and then when the weather improves I'll do some endurance rides since early April is a century. Last August my younger brother dropped me like the layer of dust on his bike. But he ran out of steam 10 miles from the end. But that ain't the way he tells it.

So, lets see how it goes.

If you want training for power you have to do that with a power meter so you know what you are doing. Average speed is not a good indicator especially when traffic lights are involved. If you just want to train (for what?) more effective than I agree short rides with higher intensities followed by enough recovery time are the way to go. Long boring rides with constant and low intensities are something from the past. For training that is except for PBP of course.

Lou

I absolutely disagree with the idea of power meters. Even the pros are stopping using those things.

What do you disagree with? Pros stopping with power meters? For training? Absolute nonsense.

Lou


Pros usually do not ride with power meters anymore. You use them when testing for TT's so that you know how much power you can put out for the length and difficulty of the course. Eneos was using them to monitor climbing power. The problem with this is that you have to go with the breaks so all your plans go out the window. So about all they are using them for is lab work and TT's.


A power meter is a trainings device and all pro riders use one. A race is a race and it is rue that you have to ride in the red zone to win a race or stage, but the majority of the riders ride a race with a power meter at least to analyse the data afterwards or do you think all the Garmin head units you see on their bikes are for following the route? . GC riders use de data of the power meters during the race because for them it is 3 weeks race to win.

Lou

https://cyclinguphill.com/pros-and-c...-power-meters/

I can't find the article now - they blamed the Tour loss of Froome on his power meter and that riders were stopping using power meters except in TT's


What kind of nonsense is that? Did the power meter slowed hime down? Chris Froome won 4 Tours, 1 Giro d'Italia and 2 Vuelta's because he used a power meter. The Giro stage where he beat Tom Dumoulin was because of a fine team tactic/plan and he knew exactly what he was doing. Tom Dumoulin lost that Giro because he was not confident of his ability and waited on the downhill of the Colle Delle Finestre for some help from other riders. He should just have trusted his power meter on a man to man fight with Froome. Maybe he did but in the previous days he was better than Froome.

Most of the times the criticism of the use of power meters (and communication) don't come from the riders (except Nikki Terpstra maybe) or staff but from the audience/spectators who think races become predictable and boring. They like to see the riders attack all the time like a headless chicken and then competely collapse 5 km before the finish. That is easy to say sitting in front of the TV with a beer.

Lou


Chris Froome was riding at his near max while being pulled up the mountain by is team. That meant he burned out his team and was at his near max power output himself. So he didn't have the punch when he needed it.


That tactic require the use of a power meter and this is what the Sky (Ineos) did; being pulled just under your limit and only the last 1-2 km of a climb in the red zone gaining just a couple of seconds in mountain stages. The big time gain is in the time trials were a power meter is even more important. It is also a dangerous tactic if an opponent is as strong or stronger. He then sits 'comfortable' in your wheel and take advantage of the pulling of your teammates. Look what happened in the big tours with the Movistar team. Quintana and Valverde were not strong enough.
Pro riders not using a power meter during the big tours is ridiculous.

Lou
  #15  
Old December 31st 19, 03:05 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,231
Default Training for Power

On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 3:06:44 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 7:00:24 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 1:31:56 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 1:30:19 AM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 1:23:31 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 7:32:31 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 9:53:48 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 6:25:29 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Saturday, December 28, 2019 at 11:50:06 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Saturday, December 28, 2019 at 1:23:54 AM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
As I probably misplaced in Andre's string, I have decided to train in the winter for power. I can't remember doing this before but I must have done so.

I had a couple of toutes that are between 20 and 30 miles and I do a fast first half. Stop for coffee and donut and then a fast return. 24 miles ends up being about 2 hours with the stop.

When I started a couple of weeks ago I was averaging between 11 and 11.5 mph. Yesterday I was a git sore from Tuesday so I tried to take it a little easier. Tuesday's average was 14 mph and Thursday's was 14,75. There are a couple of rises that I was slowing down on and I'm not slowing down nearly as much now.

So let's see how this winter progresses and then when the weather improves I'll do some endurance rides since early April is a century. Last August my younger brother dropped me like the layer of dust on his bike. But he ran out of steam 10 miles from the end. But that ain't the way he tells it.

So, lets see how it goes.

If you want training for power you have to do that with a power meter so you know what you are doing. Average speed is not a good indicator especially when traffic lights are involved. If you just want to train (for what?) more effective than I agree short rides with higher intensities followed by enough recovery time are the way to go. Long boring rides with constant and low intensities are something from the past. For training that is except for PBP of course.

Lou

I absolutely disagree with the idea of power meters. Even the pros are stopping using those things.

What do you disagree with? Pros stopping with power meters? For training? Absolute nonsense.

Lou


Pros usually do not ride with power meters anymore. You use them when testing for TT's so that you know how much power you can put out for the length and difficulty of the course. Eneos was using them to monitor climbing power. The problem with this is that you have to go with the breaks so all your plans go out the window. So about all they are using them for is lab work and TT's.


A power meter is a trainings device and all pro riders use one. A race is a race and it is rue that you have to ride in the red zone to win a race or stage, but the majority of the riders ride a race with a power meter at least to analyse the data afterwards or do you think all the Garmin head units you see on their bikes are for following the route? . GC riders use de data of the power meters during the race because for them it is 3 weeks race to win.

Lou

https://cyclinguphill.com/pros-and-c...-power-meters/

I can't find the article now - they blamed the Tour loss of Froome on his power meter and that riders were stopping using power meters except in TT's

What kind of nonsense is that? Did the power meter slowed hime down? Chris Froome won 4 Tours, 1 Giro d'Italia and 2 Vuelta's because he used a power meter. The Giro stage where he beat Tom Dumoulin was because of a fine team tactic/plan and he knew exactly what he was doing. Tom Dumoulin lost that Giro because he was not confident of his ability and waited on the downhill of the Colle Delle Finestre for some help from other riders. He should just have trusted his power meter on a man to man fight with Froome. Maybe he did but in the previous days he was better than Froome.

Most of the times the criticism of the use of power meters (and communication) don't come from the riders (except Nikki Terpstra maybe) or staff but from the audience/spectators who think races become predictable and boring. They like to see the riders attack all the time like a headless chicken and then competely collapse 5 km before the finish. That is easy to say sitting in front of the TV with a beer.

Lou


Chris Froome was riding at his near max while being pulled up the mountain by is team. That meant he burned out his team and was at his near max power output himself. So he didn't have the punch when he needed it.


That tactic require the use of a power meter and this is what the Sky (Ineos) did; being pulled just under your limit and only the last 1-2 km of a climb in the red zone gaining just a couple of seconds in mountain stages. The big time gain is in the time trials were a power meter is even more important. It is also a dangerous tactic if an opponent is as strong or stronger. He then sits 'comfortable' in your wheel and take advantage of the pulling of your teammates. Look what happened in the big tours with the Movistar team. Quintana and Valverde were not strong enough.
Pro riders not using a power meter during the big tours is ridiculous.

Lou


I was wondering why there are many many power meters for sale on Craigslist..
  #16  
Old December 31st 19, 04:01 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11,248
Default Training for Power

On 12/30/2019 8:05 PM, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 3:06:44 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 7:00:24 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 1:31:56 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 1:30:19 AM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 1:23:31 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 7:32:31 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 9:53:48 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 6:25:29 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Saturday, December 28, 2019 at 11:50:06 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Saturday, December 28, 2019 at 1:23:54 AM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:


-much snip-

I was wondering why there are many many power meters for sale on Craigslist.


Both people who bought (or were given) one, yet found
structured cycling activity unattractive plus riders who
continue to upgrade to improved (or maybe just more
feature-laden) models.

To some smaller extent, people who bought one cheap at a PX
or overseas outlet and also those who pilfered one or some
at work. Not to mention the ever-present shoplifters.

In short, just like everything else in the secondary
markets; nothing to see here.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #17  
Old December 31st 19, 12:13 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 700
Default Training for Power

On Tuesday, December 31, 2019 at 4:02:15 AM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
On 12/30/2019 8:05 PM, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 3:06:44 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 7:00:24 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 1:31:56 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 1:30:19 AM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 1:23:31 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 7:32:31 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 9:53:48 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 6:25:29 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Saturday, December 28, 2019 at 11:50:06 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Saturday, December 28, 2019 at 1:23:54 AM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:


-much snip-

I was wondering why there are many many power meters for sale on Craigslist.


Both people who bought (or were given) one, yet found
structured cycling activity unattractive plus riders who
continue to upgrade to improved (or maybe just more
feature-laden) models.

To some smaller extent, people who bought one cheap at a PX
or overseas outlet and also those who pilfered one or some
at work. Not to mention the ever-present shoplifters.

In short, just like everything else in the secondary
markets; nothing to see here.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


I think you are right about that. There will be people that are disappointed in the fact that is a little more complicated. You have the numbers and now what? Same applies for heart rate monitors, GPS devices, cadence sensors or even cycling computers. Tom should ask himself what 'training for power' means to him as a 75 year old. If he means training with varying power blocks he needs a goal, a trainings plan and a power meter to know what he is doing. Him mentioning that he already sees an effect after 1 or 2 rides based on average speed make me suspicious. I hope that when I am at that age I'm satisfied by just riding the best I can without worrying that it gets downhill with age. I think Tom has a hard time to accept that.
Happy new year to you all.

Lou
  #18  
Old December 31st 19, 03:20 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_7_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 80
Default Training for Power

wrote:
On Tuesday, December 31, 2019 at 4:02:15 AM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
On 12/30/2019 8:05 PM, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 3:06:44 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 7:00:24 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 1:31:56 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 1:30:19 AM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 1:23:31 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 7:32:31 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 9:53:48 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 6:25:29 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Saturday, December 28, 2019 at 11:50:06 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Saturday, December 28, 2019 at 1:23:54 AM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:


-much snip-

I was wondering why there are many many power meters for sale on Craigslist.


Both people who bought (or were given) one, yet found
structured cycling activity unattractive plus riders who
continue to upgrade to improved (or maybe just more
feature-laden) models.

To some smaller extent, people who bought one cheap at a PX
or overseas outlet and also those who pilfered one or some
at work. Not to mention the ever-present shoplifters.

In short, just like everything else in the secondary
markets; nothing to see here.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


I think you are right about that. There will be people that are
disappointed in the fact that is a little more complicated. You have the
numbers and now what? Same applies for heart rate monitors, GPS devices,
cadence sensors or even cycling computers. Tom should ask himself what
'training for power' means to him as a 75 year old. If he means training
with varying power blocks he needs a goal, a trainings plan and a power
meter to know what he is doing. Him mentioning that he already sees an
effect after 1 or 2 rides based on average speed make me suspicious. I
hope that when I am at that age I'm satisfied by just riding the best I
can without worrying that it gets downhill with age. I think Tom has a
hard time to accept that.
Happy new year to you all.

Lou


Happy new year.

  #20  
Old January 1st 20, 12:48 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,231
Default Training for Power

On Tuesday, December 31, 2019 at 3:13:21 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Tuesday, December 31, 2019 at 4:02:15 AM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
On 12/30/2019 8:05 PM, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 3:06:44 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 7:00:24 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 1:31:56 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Monday, December 30, 2019 at 1:30:19 AM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 1:23:31 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 7:32:31 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 9:53:48 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Sunday, December 29, 2019 at 6:25:29 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Saturday, December 28, 2019 at 11:50:06 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Saturday, December 28, 2019 at 1:23:54 AM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:


-much snip-

I was wondering why there are many many power meters for sale on Craigslist.


Both people who bought (or were given) one, yet found
structured cycling activity unattractive plus riders who
continue to upgrade to improved (or maybe just more
feature-laden) models.

To some smaller extent, people who bought one cheap at a PX
or overseas outlet and also those who pilfered one or some
at work. Not to mention the ever-present shoplifters.

In short, just like everything else in the secondary
markets; nothing to see here.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


I think you are right about that. There will be people that are disappointed in the fact that is a little more complicated. You have the numbers and now what? Same applies for heart rate monitors, GPS devices, cadence sensors or even cycling computers. Tom should ask himself what 'training for power' means to him as a 75 year old. If he means training with varying power blocks he needs a goal, a trainings plan and a power meter to know what he is doing. Him mentioning that he already sees an effect after 1 or 2 rides based on average speed make me suspicious. I hope that when I am at that age I'm satisfied by just riding the best I can without worrying that it gets downhill with age. I think Tom has a hard time to accept that.
Happy new year to you all.

Lou


If you look at them you can see that most of these are probably "upgrades". Unlike Andrew's thoughts, these are hardly the sort of thing that someone pilfers or buys at a PX.
 




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