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Minnesota Winters



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 13th 08, 07:00 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc,rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.soc,alt.mountain-bike,rec.bicycles.rides
Chris[_12_]
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Posts: 275
Default Minnesota Winters

On Dec 12, 8:56*am, "Jeff Grippe" wrote:
I think that Tucson is rated #3 in some lists of top cities for cyclist.
Seattle, I believe, is #1 but I personally couldn't take the climate. With
all my various broken and repaired parts, I need dry. I understand that
Seattle is a fantastic place to live but its just not for me. Portland, I've
heard is also quite good but I have the same climate problems. So when I'm
ready to leave NY, I think I'll head to Tucson.
- Show quoted text -


I live in Seattle and moved here from Tucson. I can say that I would
rather ride bikes in Tucson for any one of a number of reasons. Tucson
streets are much wider even if there isn't a bike lane than Seattle
streets. Tucson is also much flatter than Seattle if you want it, but
you can still get hills if you want as well. The USPS Team trains
there climbing Mt Lemon. Tucson has less rain, but when it is raining,
I'd rather be in Seattle. The rain in Tucson is monsoon as a rule, and
is usually well over 1" an hour, whereas Seattle is pouring if it is
more than 1/2" an hour. Not to mention there is drainage for regular
rain in Seattle in the streets, but none in Tucson.

Then there is the sun and abundence of amazing Mexican food in Tucson.

I'll take the Tucson drivers too.

Chris
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  #2  
Old December 13th 08, 10:45 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc,rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.soc,alt.mountain-bike,rec.bicycles.rides
Chalo
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Posts: 5,093
Default Minnesota Winters

Jeff Grippe wrote:

I live in Seattle and moved here from Tucson. I can say that I would
rather ride bikes in Tucson for any one of a number of reasons. Tucson
streets are much wider even if there isn't a bike lane than Seattle
streets. Tucson is also much flatter than Seattle if you want it, but
you can still get hills if you want as well. The USPS Team trains
there climbing Mt Lemon. Tucson has less rain, but when it is raining,
I'd rather be in Seattle. The rain in Tucson is monsoon as a rule, and
is usually well over 1" an hour, whereas Seattle is pouring if it is
more than 1/2" an hour. Not to mention there is drainage for regular
rain in Seattle in the streets, but none in Tucson.

Then there is the sun and abundence of amazing Mexican food in Tucson.

I'll take the Tucson drivers too.


I spent several years in Seattle before returning to my hometown of
Austin. My impression of cycling in the two cities is thus: It's
generally easier and better to ride bike in Austin. The terrain is a
lot more forgiving and the weather is loads better. But a lot more
people ride bike in Seattle, so all the social infrastructure is
better sorted out-- bike shops, bike clubs, bike events. There are
better bike paths around town. Even the car drivers in Seattle are
more prepared to deal with cyclists.

It's a funny coincidence that Austin and Seattle receive almost the
same amount of precipitation per year. Seattle gets it spread out
over 200 days or so. Austin seems to receive just a small handful of
awe-inspiring biblical deluges per year. When I moved to Seattle, I
was struck by how poorly worked out the street drainage was. In the
flatter areas it is common to have water pool up in the street. If
Austin had Seattle's storm drainage, people would die as a result.

The Mexican food situation in Seattle is dreary, but the Vietnamese
and Ethiopian food can't be beat. Don't waste the opportunity. These
are cuisines that few cities get exactly right.

If you ride the Burke-Gilman trail up to Bothell, surprisingly there
are a couple of decent Mexican restaurants right around where the B-G
ends and the Lake Sammamish Trail takes up. El Quetzal on Beacon Ave
is another excellent place to scratch your Mexican food itch.

Chalo
  #3  
Old December 13th 08, 06:06 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc,rec.bicycles.soc
Michael[_4_]
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Posts: 3
Default Minnesota Winters



Chalo wrote:
I spent several years in Seattle before returning to my hometown of
Austin. My impression of cycling in the two cities is thus: It's
generally easier and better to ride bike in Austin. The terrain is a
lot more forgiving and the weather is loads better.

(snip)

I agree, I didn't find Seattle agreeable place to ride. I'm not a young pup anymore.

The Mexican food situation in Seattle is dreary, but the Vietnamese
and Ethiopian food can't be beat. Don't waste the opportunity. These
are cuisines that few cities get exactly right.


A *big* plus for Austin: BBQ-anything (I'm partial to brisket) and exquisite fried catfish! And ice
tea (everyone drinks it; restaurants push it; it's the State Drink). Nothing felt stranger to this
NY State native than getting out of my rental car at a job site in Austin and smelling fresh mowed
grass ... in February.

(snip)

Chalo

  #4  
Old December 13th 08, 06:59 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc,rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.soc,alt.mountain-bike,rec.bicycles.rides
Jay Beattie
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Posts: 4,322
Default Minnesota Winters

On Dec 13, 1:45*am, Chalo wrote:
Jeff Grippe wrote:

I live in Seattle and moved here from Tucson. I can say that I would
rather ride bikes in Tucson for any one of a number of reasons. Tucson
streets are much wider even if there isn't a bike lane than Seattle
streets. Tucson is also much flatter than Seattle if you want it, but
you can still get hills if you want as well. The USPS Team trains
there climbing Mt Lemon. Tucson has less rain, but when it is raining,
I'd rather be in Seattle. The rain in Tucson is monsoon as a rule, and
is usually well over 1" an hour, whereas Seattle is pouring if it is
more than 1/2" an hour. Not to mention there is drainage for regular
rain in Seattle in the streets, but none in Tucson.


Then there is the sun and abundence of amazing Mexican food in Tucson.


I'll take the Tucson drivers too.


I spent several years in Seattle before returning to my hometown of
Austin. *My impression of cycling in the two cities is thus: *It's
generally easier and better to ride bike in Austin. *The terrain is a
lot more forgiving and the weather is loads better. *But a lot more
people ride bike in Seattle, so all the social infrastructure is
better sorted out-- bike shops, bike clubs, bike events. *There are
better bike paths around town. *Even the car drivers in Seattle are
more prepared to deal with cyclists.

It's a funny coincidence that Austin and Seattle receive almost the
same amount of precipitation per year. *Seattle gets it spread out
over 200 days or so. *Austin seems to receive just a small handful of
awe-inspiring biblical deluges per year. *When I moved to Seattle, I
was struck by how poorly worked out the street drainage was. *In the
flatter areas it is common to have water pool up in the street. *If
Austin had Seattle's storm drainage, people would die as a result.

The Mexican food situation in Seattle is dreary, but the Vietnamese
and Ethiopian food can't be beat. *Don't waste the opportunity. *These
are cuisines that few cities get exactly right.

If you ride the Burke-Gilman trail up to Bothell, surprisingly there
are a couple of decent Mexican restaurants right around where the B-G
ends and the Lake Sammamish Trail takes up. *El Quetzal on Beacon Ave
is another excellent place to scratch your Mexican food itch.


What about the heat in Tucson? I have some experience riding in the
desert and found that it was impossible to ride in the summer sun, but
I'm not a big heat person, either. I don't like Seattle because of
the traffic; it is nice city to visit, but the weather is even more
dreary than PDX.

I was raised in the south SF Bay (Los Gatos), which has the perfect
weather and some of the best riding anywhere. I visit fairly
frequently, but I am always happy to get back to PDX for some reason.
I have grown accustomed to the seasons and all the trees and the pace
of life. It's nice to be back in the Republic of Portland with all the
bohemian wage earners and not a Ferrari in sight. Plus, I get to go
skiing every weekend -- starting probably next week, assuming no
problems with my new metal-filled leg. And as for Mexican food, we got
it, and if it has to be uber-authentic, you go down to one of those
joints in Woodburn where you're the only anglo in the place. -- Jay
Beattie.
  #5  
Old December 14th 08, 07:26 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc,rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.soc,alt.mountain-bike,rec.bicycles.rides
Chris[_12_]
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Posts: 275
Default Minnesota Winters

On Dec 13, 9:59*am, Jay Beattie wrote:
What about the heat in Tucson?
- Show quoted text -


In winter, it ranges between 60's during the day, to 40's or colder at
night. It's still very dry, so it is important to stay hydrated.

Chris
  #6  
Old December 15th 08, 09:09 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc,rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.soc,alt.mountain-bike,rec.bicycles.rides
[email protected]
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Posts: 2,041
Default Minnesota Winters

On Dec 14, 12:26*am, Chris wrote:
On Dec 13, 9:59*am, Jay Beattie wrote:

What about the heat in Tucson?
- Show quoted text -


In winter, it ranges between 60's during the day, to 40's or colder at
night. It's still very dry, so it is important to stay hydrated.

Chris


Sh--. High of 9 F today. Low of 5 below F. And there is a whole row
or two of states north of me so its almost balmy here.
  #7  
Old December 16th 08, 12:25 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc,rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.soc,alt.mountain-bike,rec.bicycles.rides
Jay Beattie
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Posts: 4,322
Default Minnesota Winters

On Dec 15, 12:09*pm, "
wrote:
On Dec 14, 12:26*am, Chris wrote:

On Dec 13, 9:59*am, Jay Beattie wrote:


What about the heat in Tucson?
- Show quoted text -


In winter, it ranges between 60's during the day, to 40's or colder at
night. It's still very dry, so it is important to stay hydrated.


Chris


Sh--. *High of 9 F today. *Low of 5 below F. *And there is a whole row
or two of states north of me so its almost balmy here.


I feel for you, really. We got snow over the weekend and are in the
middle of a cold snap -- but no where near single digits F. The snow
is only an inch or two downtown and has been reduced to sheet ice in
many places. I rode to work on my cross bike and had to get off and
walk in a couple of spots. I am going to have to pick my way home
until I get off the main roads and in to the hills. I can't gain too
much elevation, or else I'll be sledding home. I'm probably going to
have to drive tomorrow or take the bus.

On a somewhat tech note, I went to put on my (car) snow wheels on
Saturday, and my aluminum rims had welded to the iron hubs. Should
have used my anti-seize! Getting those mo-fos off was a monumental
PIA, but finally got it done. -- Jay Beattie.
  #8  
Old December 16th 08, 04:12 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc,rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.soc,alt.mountain-bike,rec.bicycles.rides
Tim McNamara
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Posts: 6,945
Default Minnesota Winters

In article
,
" wrote:

On Dec 14, 12:26*am, Chris wrote:
On Dec 13, 9:59*am, Jay Beattie wrote:

What about the heat in Tucson? - Show quoted text -


In winter, it ranges between 60's during the day, to 40's or colder
at night. It's still very dry, so it is important to stay hydrated.

Chris


Sh--. High of 9 F today. Low of 5 below F. And there is a whole
row or two of states north of me so its almost balmy here.


-1F for the high today, -14F predicted for the low tonight, and the cold
part of the winter yet to come. Ed and I have finally found something
to agree on. Minnesota winters suck.
  #9  
Old December 16th 08, 04:17 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc,rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.soc,alt.mountain-bike,rec.bicycles.rides
Jorg Lueke
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Posts: 145
Default Minnesota Winters

On Dec 15, 9:12*pm, Tim McNamara wrote:
In article
,

" wrote:
On Dec 14, 12:26*am, Chris wrote:
On Dec 13, 9:59*am, Jay Beattie wrote:


What about the heat in Tucson? - Show quoted text -


In winter, it ranges between 60's during the day, to 40's or colder
at night. It's still very dry, so it is important to stay hydrated.


Chris


Sh--. *High of 9 F today. *Low of 5 below F. *And there is a whole
row or two of states north of me so its almost balmy here.


-1F for the high today, -14F predicted for the low tonight, and the cold
part of the winter yet to come. *Ed and I have finally found something
to agree on. *Minnesota winters suck.


It kills the bugs
  #10  
Old December 16th 08, 04:40 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc,rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.soc,alt.mountain-bike,rec.bicycles.rides
Chalo
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Posts: 5,093
Default Minnesota Winters

Jorg Lueke wrote:

Tim McNamara wrote:

-1F for the high today, -14F predicted for the low tonight, and the cold
part of the winter yet to come. *Ed and I have finally found something
to agree on. *Minnesota winters suck.


It kills the bugs


Here in Austin, we use Mexican Free-tailed bats for that.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Congress_Avenue_Bridge

Chalo
 




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