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OT. Anything BICYCLING related going on here? LOL



 
 
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  #21  
Old February 13th 20, 09:10 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 8,454
Default OT. Anything BICYCLING related going on here? LOL

On 2/13/2020 1:56 PM, wrote:
On Thursday, February 13, 2020 at 12:43:19 AM UTC+1, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
Anyone here doing anything BICYCLING related?

Cheers


It seems that we are skipping winter over here. No snow, no icy roads or other inconvenience. The lowest temperatures up to now were just above freezing which is no problem for a 2-3 hour ride. This years counter is at almost 1300 km. The roads were wet a lot though so I had to cleaned my bikes often.

Got informed today why the frame of my new gravel bike is delayed. 'The finish of and around the bottom bracket shell was not according to manufacturer standards' and the frame didn't pass their quality control. I don't what that means but someone in Colorado f*cked up and has to do something over. Bummer...


I'm surprised someone in Europe is buying bikes from the U.S. How times
have changed!

--
- Frank Krygowski
Ads
  #22  
Old February 13th 20, 09:20 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 8,454
Default OT. Anything BICYCLING related going on here? LOL

On 2/13/2020 12:22 AM, jbeattie wrote:
We skipped winter this year, unless it hits us later. A few icy mornings and the usual rain, but that's it. No snow in town. I'm in Bend (central Oregon) on business, and its blue skies and spring like. It's freaky.


NE Ohio has been almost always way warmer than normal, and almost no
snow, but very, very gloomy. We saw a bright light in the sky a few days
ago and had to google to remember what it was. Now we've got an inch or
two of wet snow that's melted a bit and re-frozen. They're sending a
one-day cold blast tomorrow, way below freezing.

(2) When you get clicking and creaking and think its the BB, always check the rear QR and axle dropout interface. That's my only bike wisdom for the week.


Seems we could do with an entire thread on tracking down bike noises.
I've experienced many mysteries. Working on cars, a mechanic's
stethoscope has been handy, but it's useless on a bike.

Lots of stories from my son at Specialized -- he keeps buying all this scratch and dent stuff for basically nothing. It's like giving a drug addict
a job in a methadone clinic.


Bike Nashbar headquarters used to be half a mile off my usual bike route
home from work. Their outlet store (prototypes, scratch & dent, returns,
etc.) was amazing. I got a lot of stuff there I would never have
otherwise afforded. For example, I'm still wearing a Gore-Tex jacket I
bought there for $10.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #23  
Old February 13th 20, 10:04 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tim McNamara
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Posts: 6,938
Default OT. Anything BICYCLING related going on here? LOL

On Thu, 13 Feb 2020 08:26:10 -0600, AMuzi wrote:
On 2/12/2020 10:27 PM, Tim McNamara wrote:
On Wed, 12 Feb 2020 18:53:54 -0800 (PST), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

I'm really glad I'm comfortable riding when it's below freezing.
Otherwise I'd miss about 1/2 of the year riding here.


Good for you and keep it up! I have given up on winter riding, which
here means missing anywhere from 5-7 months of riding depending on
the vagaries of weather from year to year. It's dangerous enough in
the summer with motorized idiots who can't put their f*****g cell
phones away to drive for ten minutes, put those idiots on ice and
holy s**t.


And this morning with a sheet of ice and blowing snow over that, the
texting idiots are playing bumper cars.


Something I don't want to be in the middle of, whether on my bike, on
foot or in my car.
  #24  
Old February 13th 20, 10:10 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
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Posts: 11,421
Default OT. Anything BICYCLING related going on here? LOL

On 2/13/2020 3:08 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 2/13/2020 9:24 AM, AMuzi wrote:
On 2/12/2020 8:28 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 2/12/2020 6:43 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
Anyone here doing anything BICYCLING related?

Sort of. Yesterday I used my folding bike for a short ride.
Turns out the Cateye wireless cyclometer didn't register any
speed or distance. I'm hoping it's just that the sending
unit's battery needs replaced.

This has been a frequent irritation in cold weather. The 20"
wheels and the tall stem make the distance from sender to
display unit fairly large, but still within the supposed
range, according to the manual. But for years I'd have
problems with lost radio contact if the temperature dropped
below 40 F.

Last year or the year before, I decided it was because the
handlebar itself blocked the signal to some degree. I
fabricated a plastic mount to hold the display unit in front
of the handlebar. It seemed to be working until yesterday's
ride, which was right about freezing. I'll change the sender
battery and see if it helps.

But I'm at an age where I no longer enjoy riding much below
40 F. Today I'm fighting off a sore throat, which has been
my usual punishment for a cold weather ride. :-(



The triathlon world uses a computer mount which you can
fasten to the stem just below your handlebar to stay
within Cateye's wireless range.

https://www.backcountry.com/images/i...NOD0001/BK.jpg


I've played around with a couple other mounting alternatives
on this Bike Friday New World Tourist, pretty similar to
this bike:
https://i.pinimg.com/originals/10/38...69f7796603.jpg


I first fabricated a mount like the one you showed to hold
the unit halfway down the stem. But the cyclometer was in an
unprotected position during the folding process and kept
getting knocked off. (That long stem pulls out of the
headset for folding, and just sort of hangs alongside the
folded bike.)

I tried zip-tying the cyclometer mount to the top of the
main frame tube, just behind the headset. But it's really
hard to read down there, especially now that I'm deep into
bifocal age. I've also played with locating the sender in
different places on the fork.

I think what I need is a couple parabolic antennas, one at
the sender pointing up, another at the display focused down.
Kind of like the microwave towers.

Interestingly, my wife's identical bike has a much cheaper
Echowell wireless cyclometer. Hers has no problem with cold
temperatures.


Or, that may not be your problem at all. Replacing both
batteries is often the solution, especially if they measure
below spec. A new CR2032 should show 3.25~3.3V.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #25  
Old February 13th 20, 10:15 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tim McNamara
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,938
Default OT. Anything BICYCLING related going on here? LOL

On Thu, 13 Feb 2020 11:07:50 -0500, Duane
wrote:

The texting idiots and then the SUV assholes that think their 4WD will
get them around the ice. Even when they do, pulling in front of
people without 4WD and forcing them into a slide is loads of fun. I
love when the SUV goes off the road without disturbing the ones
driving safely.


32 years ago, after a terrible winter in my old mini pickup, I bought a
Ford Bronco II and took delivery on Halloween, which it turned out was
appropriate for that vehicle. Never buying another Ford (the heads
cracked, the transmission bits and bobs disintegrated, etc.). First
time I drove it on icy conditions I came up to the corner, stepped on
the brake to turn and sailed right on through. That let me know that it
accelerated better but didn't stop or turn any better. Cost me a bent
rim since the opposite curb stopped me...

29 years later I bought a Suberu Impreza. Silly name, but the AWD in
that vehicle is light years ahead of the Bronco II's crude 4WD (with
manually locking hubs). The brakes are the best I have ever had in any
car. But it still doesn't stop better or turn better on ice. At least
I haven't had to learn it the hard way since then.

Here in Minnesota there is a tradition of really enlarging upon
opportunities for stupid driving in winter. Yes, she's going to drive
down this street at 50 mph on ice so I can run that yellow-oops-red
stoplight was the escapade I witnessed 30 minutes ago. And the guy
following me to the exit who had to pull out from behind me, accelerate
around, pull back into the exit lane with about two feet to spare
between my car and the car ahead of me- apparently because I was only
going 10 mph above the speed limit. Driving really reinforces my
cynicism and expectation that people will usually do the dumbest of the
available options most of the time.
  #26  
Old February 13th 20, 10:52 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_2_]
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Posts: 481
Default OT. Anything BICYCLING related going on here? LOL

On Wednesday, February 12, 2020 at 3:43:19 PM UTC-8, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
Anyone here doing anything BICYCLING related?

Cheers


Why would there be any discussions pertinent to bicycles when they do occasionally occur they do not incite any discussion and if they do, the subject is immediately changed by John and Frank?
  #27  
Old February 13th 20, 10:54 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,849
Default OT. Anything BICYCLING related going on here? LOL

On Thursday, 13 February 2020 17:15:52 UTC-5, Tim McNamara wrote:
On Thu, 13 Feb 2020 11:07:50 -0500, Duane
wrote:

The texting idiots and then the SUV assholes that think their 4WD will
get them around the ice. Even when they do, pulling in front of
people without 4WD and forcing them into a slide is loads of fun. I
love when the SUV goes off the road without disturbing the ones
driving safely.


32 years ago, after a terrible winter in my old mini pickup, I bought a
Ford Bronco II and took delivery on Halloween, which it turned out was
appropriate for that vehicle. Never buying another Ford (the heads
cracked, the transmission bits and bobs disintegrated, etc.). First
time I drove it on icy conditions I came up to the corner, stepped on
the brake to turn and sailed right on through. That let me know that it
accelerated better but didn't stop or turn any better. Cost me a bent
rim since the opposite curb stopped me...

29 years later I bought a Suberu Impreza. Silly name, but the AWD in
that vehicle is light years ahead of the Bronco II's crude 4WD (with
manually locking hubs). The brakes are the best I have ever had in any
car. But it still doesn't stop better or turn better on ice. At least
I haven't had to learn it the hard way since then.

Here in Minnesota there is a tradition of really enlarging upon
opportunities for stupid driving in winter. Yes, she's going to drive
down this street at 50 mph on ice so I can run that yellow-oops-red
stoplight was the escapade I witnessed 30 minutes ago. And the guy
following me to the exit who had to pull out from behind me, accelerate
around, pull back into the exit lane with about two feet to spare
between my car and the car ahead of me- apparently because I was only
going 10 mph above the speed limit. Driving really reinforces my
cynicism and expectation that people will usually do the dumbest of the
available options most of the time.


Ford = Fix Or Repair Dialy or Found On Road Dead.

LOL VBEG

CHeers
  #28  
Old February 13th 20, 10:58 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
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Posts: 527
Default OT. Anything BICYCLING related going on here? LOL

On Thu, 13 Feb 2020 16:08:05 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 2/13/2020 9:24 AM, AMuzi wrote:
On 2/12/2020 8:28 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 2/12/2020 6:43 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
Anyone here doing anything BICYCLING related?

Sort of. Yesterday I used my folding bike for a short ride.
Turns out the Cateye wireless cyclometer didn't register any
speed or distance. I'm hoping it's just that the sending
unit's battery needs replaced.

This has been a frequent irritation in cold weather. The 20"
wheels and the tall stem make the distance from sender to
display unit fairly large, but still within the supposed
range, according to the manual. But for years I'd have
problems with lost radio contact if the temperature dropped
below 40 F.

Last year or the year before, I decided it was because the
handlebar itself blocked the signal to some degree. I
fabricated a plastic mount to hold the display unit in front
of the handlebar. It seemed to be working until yesterday's
ride, which was right about freezing. I'll change the sender
battery and see if it helps.

But I'm at an age where I no longer enjoy riding much below
40 F. Today I'm fighting off a sore throat, which has been
my usual punishment for a cold weather ride.* :-(



The triathlon world uses a computer mount which you can fasten to the
stem just below your handlebar to stay within Cateye's wireless range.

https://www.backcountry.com/images/i...NOD0001/BK.jpg


I've played around with a couple other mounting alternatives on this
Bike Friday New World Tourist, pretty similar to this bike:
https://i.pinimg.com/originals/10/38...69f7796603.jpg

I first fabricated a mount like the one you showed to hold the unit
halfway down the stem. But the cyclometer was in an unprotected position
during the folding process and kept getting knocked off. (That long stem
pulls out of the headset for folding, and just sort of hangs alongside
the folded bike.)

I tried zip-tying the cyclometer mount to the top of the main frame
tube, just behind the headset. But it's really hard to read down there,
especially now that I'm deep into bifocal age. I've also played with
locating the sender in different places on the fork.

I think what I need is a couple parabolic antennas, one at the sender
pointing up, another at the display focused down. Kind of like the
microwave towers.

Interestingly, my wife's identical bike has a much cheaper Echowell
wireless cyclometer. Hers has no problem with cold temperatures.


The answer is, of course, to buy another Echowell meter :-)
Amazon has one for $17.99
https://www.amazon.com/Echowell-U4-C.../dp/B01N8ULSKE

But aside from that, I use a cycle meter re calibrated as a pedal rpm
meter and I have noticed that the location - above, below, behind, a
frame tube definitely effects the distance at which the meter will
read. In one case with a cheap Chinese meter it was impossible to use
the meter in any position - the transmitter is located on a chain
stay.

I suspect that, as Andrew suggests, a logical first step might be to
replace the batteries in both the sender and the instrument with new,
checked, batteries.
--

Cheers,

John B.
  #29  
Old February 13th 20, 10:58 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11,421
Default OT. Anything BICYCLING related going on here? LOL

On 2/13/2020 4:15 PM, Tim McNamara wrote:
On Thu, 13 Feb 2020 11:07:50 -0500, Duane
wrote:

The texting idiots and then the SUV assholes that think their 4WD will
get them around the ice. Even when they do, pulling in front of
people without 4WD and forcing them into a slide is loads of fun. I
love when the SUV goes off the road without disturbing the ones
driving safely.


32 years ago, after a terrible winter in my old mini pickup, I bought a
Ford Bronco II and took delivery on Halloween, which it turned out was
appropriate for that vehicle. Never buying another Ford (the heads
cracked, the transmission bits and bobs disintegrated, etc.). First
time I drove it on icy conditions I came up to the corner, stepped on
the brake to turn and sailed right on through. That let me know that it
accelerated better but didn't stop or turn any better. Cost me a bent
rim since the opposite curb stopped me...

29 years later I bought a Suberu Impreza. Silly name, but the AWD in
that vehicle is light years ahead of the Bronco II's crude 4WD (with
manually locking hubs). The brakes are the best I have ever had in any
car. But it still doesn't stop better or turn better on ice. At least
I haven't had to learn it the hard way since then.

Here in Minnesota there is a tradition of really enlarging upon
opportunities for stupid driving in winter. Yes, she's going to drive
down this street at 50 mph on ice so I can run that yellow-oops-red
stoplight was the escapade I witnessed 30 minutes ago. And the guy
following me to the exit who had to pull out from behind me, accelerate
around, pull back into the exit lane with about two feet to spare
between my car and the car ahead of me- apparently because I was only
going 10 mph above the speed limit. Driving really reinforces my
cynicism and expectation that people will usually do the dumbest of the
available options most of the time.


applied Newtonian physics refresher course:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J6pNqCUNffI

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #30  
Old February 13th 20, 11:24 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Roger Merriman[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 201
Default OT. Anything BICYCLING related going on here? LOL

Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Wednesday, 12 February 2020 21:28:33 UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 2/12/2020 6:43 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
Anyone here doing anything BICYCLING related?


Sort of. Yesterday I used my folding bike for a short ride. Turns out
the Cateye wireless cyclometer didn't register any speed or distance.
I'm hoping it's just that the sending unit's battery needs replaced.

This has been a frequent irritation in cold weather. The 20" wheels and
the tall stem make the distance from sender to display unit fairly
large, but still within the supposed range, according to the manual. But
for years I'd have problems with lost radio contact if the temperature
dropped below 40 F.

Last year or the year before, I decided it was because the handlebar
itself blocked the signal to some degree. I fabricated a plastic mount
to hold the display unit in front of the handlebar. It seemed to be
working until yesterday's ride, which was right about freezing. I'll
change the sender battery and see if it helps.

But I'm at an age where I no longer enjoy riding much below 40 F. Today
I'm fighting off a sore throat, which has been my usual punishment for a
cold weather ride. :-(


--
- Frank Krygowski


I'm really glad I'm comfortable riding when it's below freezing.
Otherwise I'd miss about 1/2 of the year riding here.

Batteries losing power when really cold is the main reason I'm staying
with an external battery pack headlight on my bikes.

Cheers


If anything surely a external should be more prone to cold since it’s
removed from most heat sources, though in practice the size of a external
should protect it, I have both systems and neither shows any effect which
is probably down to the size of the battery packs be they external or
internal.

The wee Garmin I use on the commute most definitely does get effected by
cold, as the temperature reduces to zero so the battery level drops, again
my older larger Garmin Touring is not noticeably effected by cold.

Roger Merriman

 




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