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Favorite biking snacks?



 
 
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  #11  
Old May 27th 20, 02:05 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
jOHN b.
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Posts: 2,421
Default Favorite biking snacks?

On Tue, 26 May 2020 13:58:38 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

Riffing off the "bonk" thread:

For most of my family's bicycling career (now approaching 50 years) we
took various snacks along on rides greater than 25 miles or so. But
somehow, with changes in life and changes in riding habits, we seem to
have gotten out of that snack habit.

On a couple of recent mid-30 miler rides on country roads, my wife
didn't bonk, but she certainly ran out of steam. During one of them, I
happened to find a gel packet buried in my bag, so I gave her that. It
helped noticeably; so we should get back to carrying snacks.

But I'd prefer something a little more like food, a little less like a
medical infusion. Since we're no longer performance riders, actually
stopping the bike to eat would be OK. even though on solo rides I prefer
to keep moving.

What are people's preferences for on-bike snacks?


Easily digested carbohydrates. The most easily digested is, of course,
sugar, but any carbohydrate being aware that the more complex
carbohydrates take longer to digest and therefore should be eaten
earlier in the ride.

Marathon runners will eat massive amounts of carbohydrates the day
before a race to sort of top off the tanks and then eat lightly the
morning of the race.

I have used these "sports drinks" that contain salt and glucose and
serve to keep your sugar and salt levels up as well as maintain
hydration. Just before I broke my hip I was doing three 100 km rides a
week in tropical weather with no problems with a light breakfast and
sport drink.
--
cheers,

John B.

Ads
  #12  
Old May 27th 20, 02:59 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 4,950
Default Favorite biking snacks?

On Tuesday, May 26, 2020 at 4:58:53 PM UTC-7, Duane wrote:
jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, May 26, 2020 at 10:58:40 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
Riffing off the "bonk" thread:

For most of my family's bicycling career (now approaching 50 years) we
took various snacks along on rides greater than 25 miles or so. But
somehow, with changes in life and changes in riding habits, we seem to
have gotten out of that snack habit.

On a couple of recent mid-30 miler rides on country roads, my wife
didn't bonk, but she certainly ran out of steam. During one of them, I
happened to find a gel packet buried in my bag, so I gave her that. It
helped noticeably; so we should get back to carrying snacks.

But I'd prefer something a little more like food, a little less like a
medical infusion. Since we're no longer performance riders, actually
stopping the bike to eat would be OK. even though on solo rides I prefer
to keep moving.

What are people's preferences for on-bike snacks?


--
- Frank Krygowski


Hammer HEED (drink), so long as I can get it pro-deal. Cliff Bars from
Costco and GU packs for my birthday. Designer bike foods can be as
expensive as magical chain oils, so I try to get things as cheaply as I can.

GU packs give you a little pop and are not serious food. Hammer HEED
really makes my legs feel better, and makes me feel less fatigued. It
could be placebo effect, but so what. Cliff Bars are food. If worse comes
to worst, I'll stop at a 7-11 and get some donettes. Food of the gods.
https://voltcandyonline.com/wp-conte...Donettes-1.jpg

Another good and cheap on-bike food is Fig Newtons. Don't put them in a
bag. Let them get all crummy and funky in a jersey pocket. It adds to the flavor.

-- Jay Beattie.



I was using hammer heed for a while until someone suggested nuun tabs.
About the same effect for less money. And easy to cary a couple on the
ride.

A friend swears by fig newtons and she brings extra.


The big fat Yosemite marmots love them. https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/3676256346 My wife and I were riding through the park on the way up the Sierra. We stopped at a turn out, and my wife produced some Fig Newtons from her handlebar bag, whereupon we were beset by marmots. Beggars! They appear from nowhere.

I used Fig Newtons as my first racing food back in the '70s. Ten years later, scientists were engineering food. I'm lucky to have lived through the Pocket Rocket era, which were nothing more than maltodextrin, ephedra (ma-huang) and caffeine (guarana). After three packs, you have to go to detox. I had the shakes after one race and couldn't sleep that night. At about the same time, we got PowerBars, which were like dog chew toys on a cold day. I raced with one guy who used to wrap them around his top tube. Then endless drink mixes with long-chain polymers that did nothing but tie-up my gut. So much for science. The best food is the one that makes you feel better and not worse.

Speaking of, my wife and I did an impromptu wine tour while riding down to California. Not a good idea on a hot day. Wine is not a performance enhancing beverage -- same goes with beer. Joerg's stories about his trip to the beer garden sound half-fun.

-- Jay Beattie.

  #13  
Old May 27th 20, 04:00 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,504
Default Favorite biking snacks?


On Tue, 26 May 2020 13:58:38 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

What are people's preferences for on-bike snacks?


When we lived in New York, and all my rides were mostly rural, I
carried High Calorie Muffins: one cup of sunflower seeds, one cup of
raisins, one cup of self-rising mixed edible powder, enough something
or the other to make a batter. Over-ripe bananas were good.

I soon got tired of dividing the dough into fifteen muffin cups (or
was it two dozen?), but baking it as a cake made crumbly slices.
Eventually I realized that I needed to bake it in a *big* pan, so that
the bottom crust could hold the bars together.

When fresh Stanley prunes were in season, I left a trail of plum pits
on many a tour. Stanley prunes were just big enough to take in one
bite, and prunes don't shrink much when dried, so the fresh prunes
were chock full of sugar. I haven't seen fresh prunes of any breed in
a couple of decades.

I also made pocket cookies: "flour" one's hand with sesame seed when
forming Oatmeal Crispies into long rolls, and make the rolls very
thin. Freeze, cut quarter-inch slices, and bake. Being small, they
didn't go to crumbs in my pocket; being essentially oatmeal glued
together with butter and brown sugar, they were good fuel. And they
were tasty enough to delay a tandem team who were catching up to a
tandem ridden by a couple of friends -- who had been likewise delayed.

Here, back when I was allowed to ride*, I liked to stop for fuel along
the way. It's amusing that gas stations are often the most-convenient
places to do that. There's a bar over the Barbee Hotel that has
excellent single-serving pizza, and I enjoyed eating at Stacy's Sports
Bar before it caught fire. They rebuilt, but the food was always a
bit heavy -- sometimes I took home supper for two -- and there are two
gas stations nearby.

So an emergency food bar can be carried around for weeks or months
before it's eaten, so I buy "protein bars" (candy bars) and "fruit and
grain bars" (cookies) at Aldi. I forgot them once, thought I could
buy some comparatively-expensive bars at Kroger, and was in full
despair before I realized that I could buy bananas.

A banana and a snack bag of nuts makes a nice lunch.

Sometimes I carried a dried-beef sandwich and a fresh tomato to slice
onto it. On one memorable occasion, I carried a can of potted meat
(or maybe it was chicken salad) and sandwich makings. I didn't think
I needed a can opener because the meat was in a wrench-and-flip can,
but I cut my finger on the microserrated edge wrenchflipping leaves,
and bled like a stuck pig. It's really, really hard to open a
first-aid kit with one hand raised high above your head with the thumb
firmly pressed on the index finger! I did finally manage to get a
band-aid on it.

---------------------------------

*I managed to keep in something resembling shape all winter, then
suddenly there was nowhere to go, then I gleefully read that one of my
favorite destinations had curb service, but before I could take
advantage, my doctor ordered me to refrain from bending -- for two
days, lying flat was too strenuous. I saw him today: I can resume
sciatica exercises if I'm very, very careful, but no showers and no
bike riding -- and I didn't even tell them I have a road bike in
addition to the pedestrian accellerator she was probably thinking of
when I asked.

I see him again in eight days, to get the dressing off my nose.
Please, get that dressing off my nose!


--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/

  #14  
Old May 27th 20, 11:28 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sepp Ruf
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Posts: 363
Default Favorite biking snacks?

jbeattie wrote:

Speaking of, my wife and I did an impromptu wine tour while riding down
to California. Not a good idea on a hot day. Wine is not a performance
enhancing beverage -- same goes with beer.


I just put the two of you on the EU's no-entry list, permanently!

Old-school European (senior high) P.E. teachers recommend red wine and
running to improve their students' blood cholesterol profiles and
low-alcoholic wheat beer as the natural isotonic sports beverage.

Joerg's stories about his
trip to the beer garden sound half-fun.


Hardly fun without shadows from grown buckeye trees. Even less fun with
coronaphobe mask and distancing requirements.

(Gotta go to catch a beer garden spot for lunch!)
  #15  
Old May 27th 20, 03:38 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,053
Default Favorite biking snacks?

On 5/26/2020 12:20 PM, Radey Shouman wrote:
Frank Krygowski writes:

Riffing off the "bonk" thread:

For most of my family's bicycling career (now approaching 50 years) we
took various snacks along on rides greater than 25 miles or so. But
somehow, with changes in life and changes in riding habits, we seem to
have gotten out of that snack habit.

On a couple of recent mid-30 miler rides on country roads, my wife
didn't bonk, but she certainly ran out of steam. During one of them, I
happened to find a gel packet buried in my bag, so I gave her that. It
helped noticeably; so we should get back to carrying snacks.

But I'd prefer something a little more like food, a little less like a
medical infusion. Since we're no longer performance riders, actually
stopping the bike to eat would be OK. even though on solo rides I
prefer to keep moving.

What are people's preferences for on-bike snacks?


Raisins, dates, or other dried fruit, fruit leather (puree dried into a
sheet, apricot is a classic). These provide simple carbs with a little
taste and fiber.


Kirkland Nut Bars:
https://www.costco.com/kirkland-signature-nut-bars%2C-1.41-oz%2C-30-count.product.100524886.html.

  #16  
Old May 27th 20, 04:33 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 720
Default Favorite biking snacks?

On Tuesday, May 26, 2020 at 3:14:37 PM UTC-7, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, May 26, 2020 at 10:58:40 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
Riffing off the "bonk" thread:

For most of my family's bicycling career (now approaching 50 years) we
took various snacks along on rides greater than 25 miles or so. But
somehow, with changes in life and changes in riding habits, we seem to
have gotten out of that snack habit.

On a couple of recent mid-30 miler rides on country roads, my wife
didn't bonk, but she certainly ran out of steam. During one of them, I
happened to find a gel packet buried in my bag, so I gave her that. It
helped noticeably; so we should get back to carrying snacks.

But I'd prefer something a little more like food, a little less like a
medical infusion. Since we're no longer performance riders, actually
stopping the bike to eat would be OK. even though on solo rides I prefer
to keep moving.

What are people's preferences for on-bike snacks?


--
- Frank Krygowski


Hammer HEED (drink), so long as I can get it pro-deal. Cliff Bars from Costco and GU packs for my birthday. Designer bike foods can be as expensive as magical chain oils, so I try to get things as cheaply as I can.

GU packs give you a little pop and are not serious food. Hammer HEED really makes my legs feel better, and makes me feel less fatigued. It could be placebo effect, but so what. Cliff Bars are food. If worse comes to worst, I'll stop at a 7-11 and get some donettes. Food of the gods. https://voltcandyonline.com/wp-conte...Donettes-1.jpg

Another good and cheap on-bike food is Fig Newtons. Don't put them in a bag. Let them get all crummy and funky in a jersey pocket. It adds to the flavor.

-- Jay Beattie.


Try a Payday candy bar. It is essentially what a bike energy bar is.
  #17  
Old May 27th 20, 04:38 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 720
Default Favorite biking snacks?

On Tuesday, May 26, 2020 at 8:00:37 PM UTC-7, Joy Beeson wrote:
On Tue, 26 May 2020 13:58:38 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

What are people's preferences for on-bike snacks?


When we lived in New York, and all my rides were mostly rural, I
carried High Calorie Muffins: one cup of sunflower seeds, one cup of
raisins, one cup of self-rising mixed edible powder, enough something
or the other to make a batter. Over-ripe bananas were good.

I soon got tired of dividing the dough into fifteen muffin cups (or
was it two dozen?), but baking it as a cake made crumbly slices.
Eventually I realized that I needed to bake it in a *big* pan, so that
the bottom crust could hold the bars together.

When fresh Stanley prunes were in season, I left a trail of plum pits
on many a tour. Stanley prunes were just big enough to take in one
bite, and prunes don't shrink much when dried, so the fresh prunes
were chock full of sugar. I haven't seen fresh prunes of any breed in
a couple of decades.

I also made pocket cookies: "flour" one's hand with sesame seed when
forming Oatmeal Crispies into long rolls, and make the rolls very
thin. Freeze, cut quarter-inch slices, and bake. Being small, they
didn't go to crumbs in my pocket; being essentially oatmeal glued
together with butter and brown sugar, they were good fuel. And they
were tasty enough to delay a tandem team who were catching up to a
tandem ridden by a couple of friends -- who had been likewise delayed.

Here, back when I was allowed to ride*, I liked to stop for fuel along
the way. It's amusing that gas stations are often the most-convenient
places to do that. There's a bar over the Barbee Hotel that has
excellent single-serving pizza, and I enjoyed eating at Stacy's Sports
Bar before it caught fire. They rebuilt, but the food was always a
bit heavy -- sometimes I took home supper for two -- and there are two
gas stations nearby.

So an emergency food bar can be carried around for weeks or months
before it's eaten, so I buy "protein bars" (candy bars) and "fruit and
grain bars" (cookies) at Aldi. I forgot them once, thought I could
buy some comparatively-expensive bars at Kroger, and was in full
despair before I realized that I could buy bananas.

A banana and a snack bag of nuts makes a nice lunch.

Sometimes I carried a dried-beef sandwich and a fresh tomato to slice
onto it. On one memorable occasion, I carried a can of potted meat
(or maybe it was chicken salad) and sandwich makings. I didn't think
I needed a can opener because the meat was in a wrench-and-flip can,
but I cut my finger on the microserrated edge wrenchflipping leaves,
and bled like a stuck pig. It's really, really hard to open a
first-aid kit with one hand raised high above your head with the thumb
firmly pressed on the index finger! I did finally manage to get a
band-aid on it.

---------------------------------

*I managed to keep in something resembling shape all winter, then
suddenly there was nowhere to go, then I gleefully read that one of my
favorite destinations had curb service, but before I could take
advantage, my doctor ordered me to refrain from bending -- for two
days, lying flat was too strenuous. I saw him today: I can resume
sciatica exercises if I'm very, very careful, but no showers and no
bike riding -- and I didn't even tell them I have a road bike in
addition to the pedestrian accellerator she was probably thinking of
when I asked.

I see him again in eight days, to get the dressing off my nose.
Please, get that dressing off my nose!


As you demonstrate the idea is to have easily digested carbohydrates. I can tell how long it takes me to begin real digestion by feeling better. On centuries when I force myself to stop and eat at the rest stops I never get to the point where I need refueling.
  #18  
Old May 27th 20, 10:43 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Radey Shouman
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Posts: 1,562
Default Favorite biking snacks?

writes:

On Tuesday, May 26, 2020 at 3:14:37 PM UTC-7, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, May 26, 2020 at 10:58:40 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
Riffing off the "bonk" thread:

For most of my family's bicycling career (now approaching 50 years) we
took various snacks along on rides greater than 25 miles or so. But
somehow, with changes in life and changes in riding habits, we seem to
have gotten out of that snack habit.

On a couple of recent mid-30 miler rides on country roads, my wife
didn't bonk, but she certainly ran out of steam. During one of them, I
happened to find a gel packet buried in my bag, so I gave her that. It
helped noticeably; so we should get back to carrying snacks.

But I'd prefer something a little more like food, a little less like a
medical infusion. Since we're no longer performance riders, actually
stopping the bike to eat would be OK. even though on solo rides I prefer
to keep moving.

What are people's preferences for on-bike snacks?


--
- Frank Krygowski


Hammer HEED (drink), so long as I can get it pro-deal. Cliff Bars
from Costco and GU packs for my birthday. Designer bike foods can be
as expensive as magical chain oils, so I try to get things as
cheaply as I can.

GU packs give you a little pop and are not serious food. Hammer HEED
really makes my legs feel better, and makes me feel less fatigued.
It could be placebo effect, but so what. Cliff Bars are food. If
worse comes to worst, I'll stop at a 7-11 and get some
donettes. Food of the
gods.
https://voltcandyonline.com/wp-conte...Donettes-1.jpg

Another good and cheap on-bike food is Fig Newtons. Don't put them
in a bag. Let them get all crummy and funky in a jersey pocket. It
adds to the flavor.

-- Jay Beattie.


Try a Payday candy bar. It is essentially what a bike energy bar is.


Paydays are excellent when you need some fast calories and don't mind
chewing a bit.
  #19  
Old May 27th 20, 11:38 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 720
Default Favorite biking snacks?

On Wednesday, May 27, 2020 at 2:43:59 PM UTC-7, Radey Shouman wrote:
writes:

On Tuesday, May 26, 2020 at 3:14:37 PM UTC-7, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, May 26, 2020 at 10:58:40 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
Riffing off the "bonk" thread:

For most of my family's bicycling career (now approaching 50 years) we
took various snacks along on rides greater than 25 miles or so. But
somehow, with changes in life and changes in riding habits, we seem to
have gotten out of that snack habit.

On a couple of recent mid-30 miler rides on country roads, my wife
didn't bonk, but she certainly ran out of steam. During one of them, I
happened to find a gel packet buried in my bag, so I gave her that. It
helped noticeably; so we should get back to carrying snacks.

But I'd prefer something a little more like food, a little less like a
medical infusion. Since we're no longer performance riders, actually
stopping the bike to eat would be OK. even though on solo rides I prefer
to keep moving.

What are people's preferences for on-bike snacks?


--
- Frank Krygowski

Hammer HEED (drink), so long as I can get it pro-deal. Cliff Bars
from Costco and GU packs for my birthday. Designer bike foods can be
as expensive as magical chain oils, so I try to get things as
cheaply as I can.

GU packs give you a little pop and are not serious food. Hammer HEED
really makes my legs feel better, and makes me feel less fatigued.
It could be placebo effect, but so what. Cliff Bars are food. If
worse comes to worst, I'll stop at a 7-11 and get some
donettes. Food of the
gods.
https://voltcandyonline.com/wp-conte...Donettes-1.jpg

Another good and cheap on-bike food is Fig Newtons. Don't put them
in a bag. Let them get all crummy and funky in a jersey pocket. It
adds to the flavor.

-- Jay Beattie.


Try a Payday candy bar. It is essentially what a bike energy bar is.


Paydays are excellent when you need some fast calories and don't mind
chewing a bit.


Unlike Jay I still have all of my teeth.
  #20  
Old May 28th 20, 04:53 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,646
Default Favorite biking snacks?

On Wednesday, May 27, 2020 at 5:38:47 PM UTC-5, wrote:

Paydays are excellent when you need some fast calories and don't mind
chewing a bit.


Unlike Jay I still have all of my teeth.



And why do you think Jay doesn't have a full complement of teeth? He is an attorney. So I am guessing he makes at least the median US income. So he should be able to afford a dental insurance plan. He is an independent attorney, not employed by a firm. So he does have to purchase his own plan. But I assume there are insurance plans available to attorneys offices. So he is probably able to get dental insurance through work, sort of, if he cannot purchase a dental plan as an individual.
 




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