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Training or Plain Riding?



 
 
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  #21  
Old December 8th 08, 08:06 AM posted to rec.bicycles.racing
Howard Kveck
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Posts: 3,549
Default Training or Plain Riding?

In article ,
Bret Wade wrote:

Howard Kveck wrote:
In article
,
Kurgan Gringioni wrote:

On Dec 6, 12:48 pm, "Tom Kunich" [email protected] com wrote:
"Kurgan Gringioni" wrote in message

...



If you were even a half decent engineer, you'd figure out that it's
fast and easy to pinpoint a set of bearings that will outlast the rest
of the wheelset, buy them with a few clicks of the mouse and install
them.
I do find it comical that you haven't the slightest clue what you're talking
about but don't have a problem demonstrating it to everyone else.


If only you knew. If you're ever in San Diego, I'll show you around
the shop. It's likely, deduced from the content of your posts, that
you don't know how most of the **** works.


How bizarre was that? You post a simple solution to the "problem" he was whinging
about and he says *you* don't have a clue? Tom's connection to reality when it comes
to things like this is tenuous, at best. Like the time he insisted that Look makes the
molds for their cleats on manual mills in North Africa and that I didn't "have a clue"
about how molds are made. I think you know a bit about what my knowledge level
is in machining.


I didn't see where bad bearings fit into the original premise of stupid
light racing equipment anyway. And the fork failures described both
involved crashes where operator error was the root cause and a crash
would have occurred whether the fork failed or not.


That's pretty much what I saw. His later comments about how the "bad bearings"
allowed a freehub to skip seems dubious to me, at least on a Mavic wheel. The way the
wheel is assembled, there'd have to be a *lot* of sideplay in the bearings before the
pawls would skip. I'll bet the problem was worn teeth on the cassette. As for the
"fork failures," when a fork breaks because you stuck your size 13 hoof into the
moving wheel, it isn't really a fork failure. They really aren't designed to handle
things like that. (By the way: a "new fangled pedal" that failed? WTF? Which one is
that? The last new pedal design I can recall is the Crank Bros. from about 10 years
ago. And how is the fact that he pulled his foot out a "failure" of the pedal?) His
story about a bike having a head tube pop cleanly off is one he's told previously,
naming Parlee as the brand. I'd bet if someone got in contact with Parlee, they'd get
told that Parlee has no records of any such incident.

Maybe T ought to consider getting a steel fork, clips, straps and cleats and 36
spoke wheels (straight 14 gauge spokes, too). That way he won't find it so easy to
pull his great ham loose and stick it into his own front wheel. Just sayin'.

--
tanx,
Howard

Caught playing safe
It's a bored game

remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
Ads
  #22  
Old December 8th 08, 10:06 AM posted to rec.bicycles.racing
Kurgan Gringioni
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Posts: 1,796
Default Training or Plain Riding?

On Dec 7, 11:06*pm, Howard Kveck wrote:

* *That's pretty much what I saw. His later comments about how the "bad bearings"
allowed a freehub to skip seems dubious to me, at least on a Mavic wheel. The way the
wheel is assembled, there'd have to be a *lot* of sideplay in the bearings before the
pawls would skip. I'll bet the problem was worn teeth on the cassette. As for the
"fork failures," when a fork breaks because you stuck your size 13 hoof into the
moving wheel, it isn't really a fork failure. They really aren't designed to handle
things like that. (By the way: a "new fangled pedal" that failed? WTF? Which one is
that? The last new pedal design I can recall is the Crank Bros. from about 10 years
ago. And how is the fact that he pulled his foot out a "failure" of the pedal?) His
story about a bike having a head tube pop cleanly off is one he's told previously,
naming Parlee as the brand. I'd bet if someone got in contact with Parlee, they'd get
told that Parlee has no records of any such incident.

* *Maybe T ought to consider getting a steel fork, clips, straps and cleats and 36
spoke wheels (straight 14 gauge spokes, too). That way he won't find it so easy to
pull his great ham loose and stick it into his own front wheel. Just sayin'.





Dumbass -


There's a lot of engineers like TK who passed their classes in
college, but have no hands on experience with actually building stuff.

That nearly always leads to a negative result: a bad engineer. Those
types can float around big companies for awhile, sometimes decades,
but eventually they become unemployable (example: TK).


thanks,

K. Gringioni.
  #23  
Old December 8th 08, 10:43 AM posted to rec.bicycles.racing
Amit Ghosh
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Posts: 1,384
Default Training or Plain Riding?



* *Maybe T ought to consider getting a steel fork, clips, straps and cleats and 36
spoke wheels (straight 14 gauge spokes, too). That way he won't find it so easy to
pull his great ham loose and stick it into his own front wheel. Just sayin'.


dumbass,

a lot of old school stuff failed too. frames were often inconsistent
but then, as it is now, boutique performance stuff (excell tubing,
hoshi spokes) were more failure prone than the usual racing and mid-
level stuff.
  #24  
Old December 8th 08, 04:52 PM posted to rec.bicycles.racing
Tom Kunich
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Posts: 6,456
Default Training or Plain Riding?

"Kurgan Gringioni" wrote in message
...

There's a lot of engineers like TK who passed their classes in
college, but have no hands on experience with actually building stuff.


HAHHAHHAHAHAHAHHAHHAHAHAHAHAAAA - this from an inheritance baby that does
work!

  #25  
Old December 8th 08, 09:19 PM posted to rec.bicycles.racing
Kurgan Gringioni
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Posts: 1,796
Default Training or Plain Riding?

On Dec 8, 7:52*am, "Tom Kunich" [email protected] com wrote:
"Kurgan Gringioni" wrote in message

...



There's a lot of engineers like TK who passed their classes in
college, but have no hands on experience with actually building stuff.


HAHHAHHAHAHAHAHHAHHAHAHAHAHAAAA - this from an inheritance baby that does
work!





Dumbass -


It's easy to tell from your posts. You never actually built stuff, or
not very much.

For example, if you did, you wouldn't be doing stuff like complaining
about those bearings. A decent engineer simply fixes little problems
like that. It's not even worth talking about.


thanks,

K. Gringioni.
  #26  
Old December 8th 08, 09:31 PM posted to rec.bicycles.racing
Bret
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Posts: 797
Default Training or Plain Riding?

On Dec 7, 4:08*pm, "Tom Kunich" [email protected] com wrote:
"Bret Wade" wrote in message

m...

Tom Kunich wrote:
"Bret Wade" wrote in message
news:[email protected] com...


I didn't see where bad bearings fit into the original premise of stupid
light racing equipment anyway.


Did you possibly see where undersized bearings did? By the way, those
same size bearings are used in many wheels.


Your problem sounds like the bearings were just out of adjustment anyway
since you describe play as the main symptom. I can't see cartridge
bearings developing much play without coming out of adjustment.


If you don't understand why didn't you just ask instead of assuming
something stupid? There was FREEPLAY in the bearings from wear. It doesn't
take much and then the freehub started skipping.

And the fork failures described both involved crashes where operator
error was the root cause and a crash would have occurred whether the
fork failed or not.


Bret, when a fork leg breaks off you go face first into the street. If it
bends you generally are thrown off sideways. By all means tell me which
you would prefer.


I think the endo was unavoidable in both cases once the operator error
occurred. It might even have been worse without the benefit of a crumple
zone.


Why are you simply inventing a series of events when all you have to do is
look at the accidents that occur to cyclists to see that I was simply
reporting what happens and not inventing anything?

As for operator error - do you actually believe that you aren't going to
make the occasional error and if the equipment is designed properly it
will keep that error from becoming serious?


You're talking about the wheel here? You consider the wheel to be
improperly designed because it allowed you to stick your foot through the
spokes? You sound like a man with a lawsuit in mind. Which makes me wonder
which side Jobst would take as an expert witness.


Here's a clue - I have had several cases in which I could have sued someone
and didn't because unless there's a wildly inappropriate action on someone
else's part you shouldn't sue.

Again you simply invent actions instead of addressing reality. Is there a
reason for that?


Just stating my opinion. The only bearing failures I've experienced
were due to excessive drag. Several times I've had bearings develop
play because they came out of adjustment and I blamed the mechanic
(me) for that.

The fork failures you described we
1. Rider hits dog, leading to incident where fork breaks.
2. Rider inserts foot in front wheel leading to incident where fork
breaks.

Correct me if I have that wrong. My opinion is that any incident
serious enough to cause the fork to break would have caused a serious
crash anyway and that the fork failure was incidental rather than a
root cause of the injury sustained. That's not making things up.

My speculation about a lawsuit was unwarranted, but it is clear that
you like to blame others for your problems.

Bret
  #27  
Old December 8th 08, 09:43 PM posted to rec.bicycles.racing
dave a
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Posts: 308
Default Training or Plain Riding?

Kurgan Gringioni wrote:

It's easy to tell from your posts. You never actually built stuff, or
not very much.

For example, if you did, you wouldn't be doing stuff like complaining
about those bearings. A decent engineer simply fixes little problems
like that. It's not even worth talking about.


thanks,

K. Gringioni.



Oh, engineers will always want to talk about it anyway, but more in
terms of the nifty tool they used or how they made a tweak that improved
the design. Cycling is geek heaven.

- dave a

  #28  
Old December 8th 08, 09:49 PM posted to rec.bicycles.racing
Tom Kunich
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Posts: 6,456
Default Training or Plain Riding?

"Kurgan Gringioni" wrote in message
...

For example, if you did, you wouldn't be doing stuff like complaining
about those bearings. A decent engineer simply fixes little problems
like that. It's not even worth talking about.


The most comical thing about all this is that you still don't understand
what I said. But then inheritance babies seldom develop any intelligence
since they have no need for it.

  #29  
Old December 8th 08, 10:02 PM posted to rec.bicycles.racing
Tom Kunich
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Posts: 6,456
Default Training or Plain Riding?

"Bret" wrote in message
...

Just stating my opinion. The only bearing failures I've experienced
were due to excessive drag. Several times I've had bearings develop
play because they came out of adjustment and I blamed the mechanic
(me) for that.


Most of the presently made hubs are using some undersized bearings. This
doesn't prevent them from working well, it simply limits their lifespan.
There's no way to fix this since it would reqiure a hub redesign. There are
no "better" bearings that would last any longer. What's more, the most
expensive bearings might even wear faster since their clearances are less
and are made to turn with less resistance from bearing wobble and not to
have a longer lifespan.

The fork failures you described we
1. Rider hits dog, leading to incident where fork breaks.
2. Rider inserts foot in front wheel leading to incident where fork
breaks.

Correct me if I have that wrong. My opinion is that any incident
serious enough to cause the fork to break would have caused a serious
crash anyway and that the fork failure was incidental rather than a
root cause of the injury sustained. That's not making things up.


In the first incident the fork didn't break. The entire headtube broke off
of the frame. I have since seen more than one case of this on a couple of
different brands.

Yes, in the second case the fork broke off. But if it were a steel fork it
wouldn't have and worse case it would have bent a little. But as I stated,
the crash would have been substantially different. Generally you suffer less
in a sideways crash than a head first crash. Also the foot would have never
have gotten into the spokes if there were more spokes.

Mind you, this isn't the fault of the companies that sold these parts. This
was clearly my fault for using such equipment regularly. I should have
understood these possible problems with this equipment and either changed it
or taken more care. (BTW - the one problem that I have taken care of is that
I have stopped using Crank Bros pedals. Mind you, they have begun making the
cleats out of a different material but I believe that the problem still
exists. Note the Shimano pedals "failure" as the clears wear is that they
become more difficult to get out of, not easier.)

My speculation about a lawsuit was unwarranted, but it is clear that
you like to blame others for your problems.


Perhaps you'd like to point out where I blamed others? You seem to be
following the postings of those who I have recently criticized pertaining to
their pointless discussions. If there's anything these people like to do
more than misrepresent others, it is to group attack someone. Join such a
band of *******s at your own risk.

  #30  
Old December 8th 08, 10:41 PM posted to rec.bicycles.racing
Kurgan Gringioni
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Posts: 1,796
Default Training or Plain Riding?

On Dec 8, 12:49*pm, "Tom Kunich" [email protected] com wrote:
"Kurgan Gringioni" wrote in message

...



For example, if you did, you wouldn't be doing stuff like complaining
about those bearings. A decent engineer simply fixes little problems
like that. It's not even worth talking about.


The most comical thing about all this is that you still don't understand
what I said. But then inheritance babies seldom develop any intelligence
since they have no need for it.




Dumbass -


Oh, that inheritance thing. I agree with you. It might explain why our
shop regularly turns away work because we're too busy while you
weren't able to find anyone willing to employ your incredible obsolete
engineering skills.


thanks,

K. Gringioni.
 




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