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Cleaning of chain and all components



 
 
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  #51  
Old July 21st 19, 04:08 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,233
Default Cleaning of chain and all components

On Sunday, July 21, 2019 at 2:04:30 AM UTC+1, Duane wrote:
jbeattie wrote:


You mean riding in gorgeous sunshine? Listening to the Mid-Westerners
complain about the heat, I feel guilty. Nice spin through the
countryside today with a ferry ride.
https://bikeportland.org/wp-content/...65a1037e_o.jpg Probably
80F. I got to the ferry, and it was pulling out. The operator saw me and
stopped, backed up, dropped the gate and let me on. It was great. There
were a couple other racer-dudes on the ferry with really nice equipment,
except for one of them had an MP3 player and was blaring Grateful Dead. I
let them get down the road a ways. Why must people blare music?




32c here today with a humidex over 40. But oddly enough the 35km/h winds
must have had an evaporative effect because it wasn’t awful. Nasty
thunderstorms lurking though.


Anyway, I decided to give the Trek a nice cleaning on the washstand. My
favorite modern invention are Costco exam gloves so I can use my finger
as a goop lathe on the pulley wheels and chainrings. I use the Park
brush and scraper on the cassettes and a stiff bristle parts brush on the
chain with Simple Green and hose spray. I flush it with WD40 and rag dry
before adding lubricant which is pedestrian TriFlo because I have a bunch
of it. I got my washstand on supersale at Western.
https://static.westernbikeworks.com/...0/ffspr2-1.jpg
You can spin the bike around which is convenient.

Speaking of, maintenance of non-bike things is important too, like sticky
fold-out legs on washstands. I also check my clown pump to make sure it
is not seized or has a bad gasket or needs lube.


Had my co2 adapter blow out the o ring trying to fill a friend’s tire. I’m
supposed to lube that a bit occasionally but I haven’t had a flat in 2
years so out of sight out of mind.

-- Jay Beattie.


--
duane


The "Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness" (John Keats, To Autumn, 1820) in the "green and beloved isle" (?) is characterized at present, generally, often, always when I want to cycle, by a persistent, ultimately drenching drizzle called "a soft day" (traditional lie taken up by the Tourist Board) driven by the wind from whichever point of the compass the cyclist's head turns.

Andre Jute
I'm not a duck!
Ads
  #52  
Old July 21st 19, 06:39 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tosspot[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,328
Default Cleaning of chain and all components

On 21/07/2019 17:08, Andre Jute wrote:
On Sunday, July 21, 2019 at 2:04:30 AM UTC+1, Duane wrote:
jbeattie wrote:


You mean riding in gorgeous sunshine? Listening to the
Mid-Westerners complain about the heat, I feel guilty. Nice spin
through the countryside today with a ferry ride.
https://bikeportland.org/wp-content/...65a1037e_o.jpg
Probably 80F. I got to the ferry, and it was pulling out. The
operator saw me and stopped, backed up, dropped the gate and let
me on. It was great. There were a couple other racer-dudes on
the ferry with really nice equipment, except for one of them had
an MP3 player and was blaring Grateful Dead. I let them get down
the road a ways. Why must people blare music?




32c here today with a humidex over 40. But oddly enough the 35km/h
winds must have had an evaporative effect because it wasn’t awful.
Nasty thunderstorms lurking though.


Anyway, I decided to give the Trek a nice cleaning on the
washstand. My favorite modern invention are Costco exam gloves
so I can use my finger as a goop lathe on the pulley wheels and
chainrings. I use the Park brush and scraper on the cassettes
and a stiff bristle parts brush on the chain with Simple Green
and hose spray. I flush it with WD40 and rag dry before adding
lubricant which is pedestrian TriFlo because I have a bunch of
it. I got my washstand on supersale at Western.
https://static.westernbikeworks.com/...0/ffspr2-1.jpg


You can spin the bike around which is convenient.

Speaking of, maintenance of non-bike things is important too,
like sticky fold-out legs on washstands. I also check my clown
pump to make sure it is not seized or has a bad gasket or needs
lube.


Had my co2 adapter blow out the o ring trying to fill a friend’s
tire. I’m supposed to lube that a bit occasionally but I haven’t
had a flat in 2 years so out of sight out of mind.

-- Jay Beattie.


-- duane


The "Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness" (John Keats, To Autumn,
1820) in the "green and beloved isle" (?) is characterized at
present, generally, often, always when I want to cycle, by a
persistent, ultimately drenching drizzle called "a soft day"
(traditional lie taken up by the Tourist Board) driven by the wind
from whichever point of the compass the cyclist's head turns.

Andre Jute I'm not a duck!


Keats? We talking about the same chap that wrote a poem about a lass
digging up her boyfriends body, cutting the head off and putting it in a
pot to grow basil? Soon after which she goes stark staring mad, as
obviously the first bit is perfectly normal, rational behavior.

  #53  
Old July 22nd 19, 01:46 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,233
Default Cleaning of chain and all components

On Sunday, July 21, 2019 at 6:39:48 PM UTC+1, Tosspot wrote:
On 21/07/2019 17:08, Andre Jute wrote:
On Sunday, July 21, 2019 at 2:04:30 AM UTC+1, Duane wrote:
jbeattie wrote:


You mean riding in gorgeous sunshine? Listening to the
Mid-Westerners complain about the heat, I feel guilty. Nice spin
through the countryside today with a ferry ride.
https://bikeportland.org/wp-content/...65a1037e_o.jpg
Probably 80F. I got to the ferry, and it was pulling out. The
operator saw me and stopped, backed up, dropped the gate and let
me on. It was great. There were a couple other racer-dudes on
the ferry with really nice equipment, except for one of them had
an MP3 player and was blaring Grateful Dead. I let them get down
the road a ways. Why must people blare music?




32c here today with a humidex over 40. But oddly enough the 35km/h
winds must have had an evaporative effect because it wasn’t awful.
Nasty thunderstorms lurking though.


Anyway, I decided to give the Trek a nice cleaning on the
washstand. My favorite modern invention are Costco exam gloves
so I can use my finger as a goop lathe on the pulley wheels and
chainrings. I use the Park brush and scraper on the cassettes
and a stiff bristle parts brush on the chain with Simple Green
and hose spray. I flush it with WD40 and rag dry before adding
lubricant which is pedestrian TriFlo because I have a bunch of
it. I got my washstand on supersale at Western.
https://static.westernbikeworks.com/...0/ffspr2-1.jpg


You can spin the bike around which is convenient.

Speaking of, maintenance of non-bike things is important too,
like sticky fold-out legs on washstands. I also check my clown
pump to make sure it is not seized or has a bad gasket or needs
lube.


Had my co2 adapter blow out the o ring trying to fill a friend’s
tire. I’m supposed to lube that a bit occasionally but I haven’t
had a flat in 2 years so out of sight out of mind.

-- Jay Beattie.

-- duane


The "Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness" (John Keats, To Autumn,
1820) in the "green and beloved isle" (?) is characterized at
present, generally, often, always when I want to cycle, by a
persistent, ultimately drenching drizzle called "a soft day"
(traditional lie taken up by the Tourist Board) driven by the wind
from whichever point of the compass the cyclist's head turns.

Andre Jute I'm not a duck!


Keats? We talking about the same chap that wrote a poem about a lass
digging up her boyfriends body, cutting the head off and putting it in a
pot to grow basil? Soon after which she goes stark staring mad, as
obviously the first bit is perfectly normal, rational behavior.


Man, that entire second generation of the English Romantic Movement was weird, and that's obvious even without knowing that Byron was a little sallow-faced man with lank, straight, oily hair, nothing like in his portraits; if you want the truth about a man, ask his servants, and in this case Byron's servants, James and Sarah Brown who after his death founded an eponymous hotel, still in existence in Mayfair if you're passing through London, left a record. Using your lover's exhumed skull as an herbarium is the least of it, at least if you compare it to incest and Devil worship. Not that the self-consciously sanctimonious English arts and crafts movement was any better. Take Eric Gill for instance, whose work Londoners can see daily on the Underground name boards in a typeface for which he set the early parameters, who used to -- ah, never mind, we don't know whose children read this group in the expectation of learning about bicycle technology.

Andre Jute
Truth + Decades = Myth
  #54  
Old July 22nd 19, 02:29 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,595
Default Cleaning of chain and all components

On 7/21/2019 7:46 PM, Andre Jute wrote:
On Sunday, July 21, 2019 at 6:39:48 PM UTC+1, Tosspot wrote:
On 21/07/2019 17:08, Andre Jute wrote:
On Sunday, July 21, 2019 at 2:04:30 AM UTC+1, Duane wrote:
jbeattie wrote:

You mean riding in gorgeous sunshine? Listening to the
Mid-Westerners complain about the heat, I feel guilty. Nice spin
through the countryside today with a ferry ride.
https://bikeportland.org/wp-content/...65a1037e_o.jpg
Probably 80F. I got to the ferry, and it was pulling out. The
operator saw me and stopped, backed up, dropped the gate and let
me on. It was great. There were a couple other racer-dudes on
the ferry with really nice equipment, except for one of them had
an MP3 player and was blaring Grateful Dead. I let them get down
the road a ways. Why must people blare music?




32c here today with a humidex over 40. But oddly enough the 35km/h
winds must have had an evaporative effect because it wasn’t awful.
Nasty thunderstorms lurking though.


Anyway, I decided to give the Trek a nice cleaning on the
washstand. My favorite modern invention are Costco exam gloves
so I can use my finger as a goop lathe on the pulley wheels and
chainrings. I use the Park brush and scraper on the cassettes
and a stiff bristle parts brush on the chain with Simple Green
and hose spray. I flush it with WD40 and rag dry before adding
lubricant which is pedestrian TriFlo because I have a bunch of
it. I got my washstand on supersale at Western.
https://static.westernbikeworks.com/...0/ffspr2-1.jpg


You can spin the bike around which is convenient.

Speaking of, maintenance of non-bike things is important too,
like sticky fold-out legs on washstands. I also check my clown
pump to make sure it is not seized or has a bad gasket or needs
lube.


Had my co2 adapter blow out the o ring trying to fill a friend’s
tire. I’m supposed to lube that a bit occasionally but I haven’t
had a flat in 2 years so out of sight out of mind.

-- Jay Beattie.

-- duane

The "Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness" (John Keats, To Autumn,
1820) in the "green and beloved isle" (?) is characterized at
present, generally, often, always when I want to cycle, by a
persistent, ultimately drenching drizzle called "a soft day"
(traditional lie taken up by the Tourist Board) driven by the wind
from whichever point of the compass the cyclist's head turns.

Andre Jute I'm not a duck!


Keats? We talking about the same chap that wrote a poem about a lass
digging up her boyfriends body, cutting the head off and putting it in a
pot to grow basil? Soon after which she goes stark staring mad, as
obviously the first bit is perfectly normal, rational behavior.


Man, that entire second generation of the English Romantic Movement was weird, and that's obvious even without knowing that Byron was a little sallow-faced man with lank, straight, oily hair, nothing like in his portraits; if you want the truth about a man, ask his servants, and in this case Byron's servants, James and Sarah Brown who after his death founded an eponymous hotel, still in existence in Mayfair if you're passing through London, left a record. Using your lover's exhumed skull as an herbarium is the least of it, at least if you compare it to incest and Devil worship. Not that the self-consciously sanctimonious English arts and crafts movement was any better. Take Eric Gill for instance, whose work Londoners can see daily on the Underground name boards in a typeface for which he set the early parameters, who used to -- ah, never mind, we don't know whose children read this group in the expectation of learning about bicycle technology.

Andre Jute
Truth + Decades = Myth


ugh.

There was a time, before modern start-of-day with NYC and LA
/inter alia/ local news, when merely reading of such a
deviant pervert would be offensive.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #55  
Old July 23rd 19, 02:46 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,233
Default Cleaning of chain and all components

On Monday, July 22, 2019 at 2:29:17 AM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
On 7/21/2019 7:46 PM, Andre Jute wrote:
On Sunday, July 21, 2019 at 6:39:48 PM UTC+1, Tosspot wrote:
On 21/07/2019 17:08, Andre Jute wrote:
On Sunday, July 21, 2019 at 2:04:30 AM UTC+1, Duane wrote:
jbeattie wrote:

You mean riding in gorgeous sunshine? Listening to the
Mid-Westerners complain about the heat, I feel guilty. Nice spin
through the countryside today with a ferry ride.
https://bikeportland.org/wp-content/...65a1037e_o.jpg
Probably 80F. I got to the ferry, and it was pulling out. The
operator saw me and stopped, backed up, dropped the gate and let
me on. It was great. There were a couple other racer-dudes on
the ferry with really nice equipment, except for one of them had
an MP3 player and was blaring Grateful Dead. I let them get down
the road a ways. Why must people blare music?




32c here today with a humidex over 40. But oddly enough the 35km/h
winds must have had an evaporative effect because it wasn’t awful.
Nasty thunderstorms lurking though.


Anyway, I decided to give the Trek a nice cleaning on the
washstand. My favorite modern invention are Costco exam gloves
so I can use my finger as a goop lathe on the pulley wheels and
chainrings. I use the Park brush and scraper on the cassettes
and a stiff bristle parts brush on the chain with Simple Green
and hose spray. I flush it with WD40 and rag dry before adding
lubricant which is pedestrian TriFlo because I have a bunch of
it. I got my washstand on supersale at Western.
https://static.westernbikeworks.com/...0/ffspr2-1.jpg


You can spin the bike around which is convenient.

Speaking of, maintenance of non-bike things is important too,
like sticky fold-out legs on washstands. I also check my clown
pump to make sure it is not seized or has a bad gasket or needs
lube.


Had my co2 adapter blow out the o ring trying to fill a friend’s
tire. I’m supposed to lube that a bit occasionally but I haven’t
had a flat in 2 years so out of sight out of mind.

-- Jay Beattie.

-- duane

The "Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness" (John Keats, To Autumn,
1820) in the "green and beloved isle" (?) is characterized at
present, generally, often, always when I want to cycle, by a
persistent, ultimately drenching drizzle called "a soft day"
(traditional lie taken up by the Tourist Board) driven by the wind
from whichever point of the compass the cyclist's head turns.

Andre Jute I'm not a duck!

Keats? We talking about the same chap that wrote a poem about a lass
digging up her boyfriends body, cutting the head off and putting it in a
pot to grow basil? Soon after which she goes stark staring mad, as
obviously the first bit is perfectly normal, rational behavior.


Man, that entire second generation of the English Romantic Movement was weird, and that's obvious even without knowing that Byron was a little sallow-faced man with lank, straight, oily hair, nothing like in his portraits; if you want the truth about a man, ask his servants, and in this case Byron's servants, James and Sarah Brown who after his death founded an eponymous hotel, still in existence in Mayfair if you're passing through London, left a record. Using your lover's exhumed skull as an herbarium is the least of it, at least if you compare it to incest and Devil worship. Not that the self-consciously sanctimonious English arts and crafts movement was any better. Take Eric Gill for instance, whose work Londoners can see daily on the Underground name boards in a typeface for which he set the early parameters, who used to -- ah, never mind, we don't know whose children read this group in the expectation of learning about bicycle technology.

Andre Jute
Truth + Decades = Myth


ugh.

There was a time, before modern start-of-day with NYC and LA
/inter alia/ local news, when merely reading of such a
deviant pervert would be offensive.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


When I was a schoolboy in a country town, Miss Keays the librarian at the public library kept even the biographies of people like Byron and Gill under the counter. Years later at the Union I made a good case that her action was an insult to Moll Flanders and Madame Bovary, also under the counter, who by comparison were decent people. Afterwards her nephew came up to me and said, with tears in his eyes, that he wished she could have been there (she was dead by this time). She wouldn't have agreed with my conclusion, he said, but she'd have been proud that I remembered and took the moral point, and anyway she enjoyed a witty speech even when she disagreed with the case being put. We could do with such broadmindedness towards contrary viewpoints in politics today.

Andre Jute
I was a smiling, polite boy, with my nose in a book
  #56  
Old July 23rd 19, 11:39 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,352
Default Cleaning of chain and all components

On Fri, 19 Jul 2019 05:54:07 +0700, John B.
wrote:

If you aren't a "bike nerd" take the bike to the shop and let somebody
else do it :-)


For me, that's the cheapest way to fix a flat. The mechanic charges
me for about five minutes of labor. I charge me about two days.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/


  #57  
Old July 26th 19, 03:36 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 586
Default Cleaning of chain and all components

On Saturday, July 20, 2019 at 3:47:06 PM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Friday, July 19, 2019 at 9:03:47 AM UTC+1, Tom Evans wrote:
On 18/07/2019 22:32, Andre Jute wrote:

3. Ride the bike. Do nothing else. Do no service whatsoever.

I do pretty much the same, on an 8 speed dérailleur. Never oil, replace
regularly.

I use a cheap chain and buy 10 or so at a time when they are cheap,
currently I have KMC Z8s.

I never got elongation checking to work, by the time the chain looked
elongated the cassette was skipping with a new chain. So I replace the
chain somewhere between 1000km-1500km, which seems to preserve the cassette.

A couple of points. It doesn't work well if you have regular rain. It
also doesn't work well with dérailleurs 8 speed, they need to be oiled
for clean shifting.


I use hub gearboxes and the chain is fully and very effectively enclosed in a Chainglider; if you're interested, see http://thorncyclesforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=6813.0 where I explain how I upped my mileage per chain to roughly 0.5% elongation, at which point I fit a new chain, from about a 1000m to near enough 3000m (4506km is the target, from the original experiment described at the link above).

Andre Jute
Focus group


Well since your chain isn't exposed to the air around it I can understand why you can get such mileage. At the moment I'm trying to see how effective the gold chains are and I can't get them to show any wear.
  #58  
Old July 26th 19, 04:34 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,233
Default Cleaning of chain and all components

On Friday, July 26, 2019 at 3:36:14 AM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Saturday, July 20, 2019 at 3:47:06 PM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Friday, July 19, 2019 at 9:03:47 AM UTC+1, Tom Evans wrote:
On 18/07/2019 22:32, Andre Jute wrote:

3. Ride the bike. Do nothing else. Do no service whatsoever.
I do pretty much the same, on an 8 speed dérailleur. Never oil, replace
regularly.

I use a cheap chain and buy 10 or so at a time when they are cheap,
currently I have KMC Z8s.

I never got elongation checking to work, by the time the chain looked
elongated the cassette was skipping with a new chain. So I replace the
chain somewhere between 1000km-1500km, which seems to preserve the cassette.

A couple of points. It doesn't work well if you have regular rain. It
also doesn't work well with dérailleurs 8 speed, they need to be oiled
for clean shifting.


I use hub gearboxes and the chain is fully and very effectively enclosed in a Chainglider; if you're interested, see http://thorncyclesforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=6813.0 where I explain how I upped my mileage per chain to roughly 0.5% elongation, at which point I fit a new chain, from about a 1000m to near enough 3000m (4506km is the target, from the original experiment described at the link above).

Andre Jute
Focus group


Well since your chain isn't exposed to the air around it I can understand why you can get such mileage. At the moment I'm trying to see how effective the gold chains are and I can't get them to show any wear.


I too buy the cheap KMC chains, in my case usually the X8 93, which is half-nickeled, half steel. There's no point in buying the X 99, which is all plated, because the plain steel shows no inclination to rust inside the factory lube and the Chainglider.

Those KMC chains are very good value for money.

Andre Jute
I can get it for you wholesale -- Budd Schulberg, and Rick Moraines
 




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