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not enough standards



 
 
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  #21  
Old January 20th 18, 11:39 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 255
Default not enough standards

On Saturday, January 20, 2018 at 11:27:09 AM UTC+1, sms wrote:
On 1/20/2018 12:31 AM, wrote:
On Friday, January 19, 2018 at 5:24:15 PM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
https://cyclingindustry.news/knolly-...axle-standard/

Hell, I can remember way back when a guy could swap wheels
between two different bicycles.


--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


The last 5-10 years they lost me with their ATB's. Can't think ever buying a new ATB. I'll stick to my 26 inch wheeled Rohloff equipped ATB and ride my Cross bike more and more for off road riding.


Bolshevik.

You should have bought a 29er, then when you realized that 29 was too
big bought a 27.5er. How will our capitalist economy function if yu
don't think of buying more stuff?


Imagine that I have unlimited funds for
bike(stuff). The only requirement for me is that it has to make some kind of sense to me. Is that the case the price is irrelavant. Still ATB bike business managed in losing my interest....

Lou
Ads
  #22  
Old January 20th 18, 03:27 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,299
Default not enough standards

On 2018-01-19 16:35, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/19/2018 5:45 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-01-19 14:55, sms wrote:
On 1/19/2018 8:24 AM, AMuzi wrote:
https://cyclingindustry.news/knolly-...axle-standard/




Hell, I can remember way back when a guy could swap
wheels between two
different bicycles.

I SPIT on the whole 1x movement.



+1

I also spat on the 2x movement. My road bike has 2x (42/52)
but because it is 35 years old and back then that's all you
could get. I suffer on steep hills for that but as the drill
sergeant always said, anything that doesn't instantly kill
you makes you tough.


... There is no way to get the
range that
was possible with 2x or 3x, even with a 10-42, and the
rear derailleur
has to take up a huge amount of chain between the high and
low cogs.

I guess if the mountain bike is transported to the
trail-head on a
vehicle, and never ridden on-road, that you can get by
without the high
gears.


Even regular 3x MTBs like mine tucker out at 28-30mph
because the biggest ring is only 42T. On the last 4-5 miles
home I sometimes wish it had 52T like my road bike. IOW 4x
would be even better. Or coarse steps, that would be the
optimum.


That said, the front shifter on my mountain bike stopped
going into high
last Saturday, and I had to buy a replacement set of Deore
shifters, $40
from REI. I opened up the old one but it was beyond my
ability to fix
it, so yesterday I changed the front shifter. Definitely
can see the
advantage of not having the extra complexity. But on the
trail I was on,
which was not steep except for a few short stretches, I
wanted those
high gears.



Could have used the redneck shifter: A somewhat straight
piece of a small branch with a 90 degree li'l branch (or a
nail) sticking out the side. When a buddy's chain pretzeled
and ripped off the front derailer that's how he shifted. It
worked so well that he forgot to order a new derailer for a
few months.



Easy; not even expensive:
http://www.abundantadventures.com/quads.html


Unfortunately though, quote "All Mountain TamerTM adapters work with
cranks having standard 74mm bolt circle (43.4mm hole spacing) 5 bolt
pattern only".

I could remove all the Shimano 600 stuff and mount other stuff. It won't
be expensive to do either but so far I have tried to keep the old bike
somewhat original.

Some day I'll have to. While right now I can still muscle up the hills
there is another more serious problem. I regularly break spokes. The
last one went on Wednesday on the last 10mi home. So I'll soon be
looking for a 700c 7-speed FH rear wheel with 12ga spokes, as many of
them as possible. A tandem wheel would be best but their rims are too
wide. The max tire width I can get in there is 25mm.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #23  
Old January 20th 18, 03:30 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,299
Default not enough standards

On 2018-01-19 16:20, sms wrote:
On 1/19/2018 3:45 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-01-19 14:55, sms wrote:
On 1/19/2018 8:24 AM, AMuzi wrote:
https://cyclingindustry.news/knolly-...axle-standard/



Hell, I can remember way back when a guy could swap wheels between two
different bicycles.

I SPIT on the whole 1x movement.



+1

I also spat on the 2x movement. My road bike has 2x (42/52) but
because it is 35 years old and back then that's all you could get. I
suffer on steep hills for that but as the drill sergeant always said,
anything that doesn't instantly kill you makes you tough.


In my area, if you want to ride up into the Santa Cruz mountains and
you're older than a millenial, it's really nice to have a triple on a
road bike. In the early 1980's, triples weren't that common then around
1983 most of the road bikes sold around hear suddenly were coming with
triples, like my Specialized Sirrus, which had a dual and a triple
option, with the triple at an extra $100. Touring bikes of course had
triples for a long time.

Last year I did a benefit ride, which I normally avoid but my little
group of troublemakers had a team, and those without a triple were
suffering.



I wonder why that is. Just our increasing weight? General weakening of
whatever? My leg muscles are definitely larger and more powerful than in
my 20's. However, while back then I could scale anything with 42/21 I
now need 42/32. Trying to wean myself back to 42/28 though.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #24  
Old January 20th 18, 03:53 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,557
Default not enough standards

On 1/20/2018 9:27 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-01-19 16:35, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/19/2018 5:45 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-01-19 14:55, sms wrote:
On 1/19/2018 8:24 AM, AMuzi wrote:
https://cyclingindustry.news/knolly-...axle-standard/





Hell, I can remember way back when a guy could swap
wheels between two
different bicycles.

I SPIT on the whole 1x movement.


+1

I also spat on the 2x movement. My road bike has 2x (42/52)
but because it is 35 years old and back then that's all you
could get. I suffer on steep hills for that but as the drill
sergeant always said, anything that doesn't instantly kill
you makes you tough.


... There is no way to get the
range that
was possible with 2x or 3x, even with a 10-42, and the
rear derailleur
has to take up a huge amount of chain between the high and
low cogs.

I guess if the mountain bike is transported to the
trail-head on a
vehicle, and never ridden on-road, that you can get by
without the high
gears.


Even regular 3x MTBs like mine tucker out at 28-30mph
because the biggest ring is only 42T. On the last 4-5 miles
home I sometimes wish it had 52T like my road bike. IOW 4x
would be even better. Or coarse steps, that would be the
optimum.


That said, the front shifter on my mountain bike stopped
going into high
last Saturday, and I had to buy a replacement set of Deore
shifters, $40
from REI. I opened up the old one but it was beyond my
ability to fix
it, so yesterday I changed the front shifter. Definitely
can see the
advantage of not having the extra complexity. But on the
trail I was on,
which was not steep except for a few short stretches, I
wanted those
high gears.


Could have used the redneck shifter: A somewhat straight
piece of a small branch with a 90 degree li'l branch (or a
nail) sticking out the side. When a buddy's chain pretzeled
and ripped off the front derailer that's how he shifted. It
worked so well that he forgot to order a new derailer for a
few months.



Easy; not even expensive:
http://www.abundantadventures.com/quads.html


Unfortunately though, quote "All Mountain TamerTM adapters
work with cranks having standard 74mm bolt circle (43.4mm
hole spacing) 5 bolt pattern only".

I could remove all the Shimano 600 stuff and mount other
stuff. It won't be expensive to do either but so far I have
tried to keep the old bike somewhat original.

Some day I'll have to. While right now I can still muscle up
the hills there is another more serious problem. I regularly
break spokes. The last one went on Wednesday on the last
10mi home. So I'll soon be looking for a 700c 7-speed FH
rear wheel with 12ga spokes, as many of them as possible. A
tandem wheel would be best but their rims are too wide. The
max tire width I can get in there is 25mm.


Shimano 600 FC6207 triple is indeed 74mm on the small ring.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #25  
Old January 20th 18, 04:12 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,220
Default not enough standards

On Friday, January 19, 2018 at 4:20:27 PM UTC-8, sms wrote:
On 1/19/2018 3:45 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-01-19 14:55, sms wrote:
On 1/19/2018 8:24 AM, AMuzi wrote:
https://cyclingindustry.news/knolly-...axle-standard/



Hell, I can remember way back when a guy could swap wheels between two
different bicycles.

I SPIT on the whole 1x movement.



+1

I also spat on the 2x movement. My road bike has 2x (42/52) but because
it is 35 years old and back then that's all you could get. I suffer on
steep hills for that but as the drill sergeant always said, anything
that doesn't instantly kill you makes you tough.


In my area, if you want to ride up into the Santa Cruz mountains and
you're older than a millenial, it's really nice to have a triple on a
road bike. In the early 1980's, triples weren't that common then around
1983 most of the road bikes sold around hear suddenly were coming with
triples, like my Specialized Sirrus, which had a dual and a triple
option, with the triple at an extra $100. Touring bikes of course had
triples for a long time.

Last year I did a benefit ride, which I normally avoid but my little
group of troublemakers had a team, and those without a triple were
suffering.


A compact will get you the same usable gears, more or less -- the less being wider steps to get you the same low gear. A 32t 11sp cassette with a 34t chainring nets a 28" gear. That's stock on my Norco Search. I never touch it except going up this one dirt trail where I lose traction (on road tires) before I run out of gears.

-- Jay Beattie.

  #26  
Old January 20th 18, 04:17 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,299
Default not enough standards

On 2018-01-20 07:53, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/20/2018 9:27 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-01-19 16:35, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/19/2018 5:45 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-01-19 14:55, sms wrote:


[...]

That said, the front shifter on my mountain bike stopped
going into high
last Saturday, and I had to buy a replacement set of Deore
shifters, $40
from REI. I opened up the old one but it was beyond my
ability to fix
it, so yesterday I changed the front shifter. Definitely
can see the
advantage of not having the extra complexity. But on the
trail I was on,
which was not steep except for a few short stretches, I
wanted those
high gears.


Could have used the redneck shifter: A somewhat straight
piece of a small branch with a 90 degree li'l branch (or a
nail) sticking out the side. When a buddy's chain pretzeled
and ripped off the front derailer that's how he shifted. It
worked so well that he forgot to order a new derailer for a
few months.



Easy; not even expensive:
http://www.abundantadventures.com/quads.html


Unfortunately though, quote "All Mountain TamerTM adapters
work with cranks having standard 74mm bolt circle (43.4mm
hole spacing) 5 bolt pattern only".

I could remove all the Shimano 600 stuff and mount other
stuff. It won't be expensive to do either but so far I have
tried to keep the old bike somewhat original.

Some day I'll have to. While right now I can still muscle up
the hills there is another more serious problem. I regularly
break spokes. The last one went on Wednesday on the last
10mi home. So I'll soon be looking for a 700c 7-speed FH
rear wheel with 12ga spokes, as many of them as possible. A
tandem wheel would be best but their rims are too wide. The
max tire width I can get in there is 25mm.


Shimano 600 FC6207 triple is indeed 74mm on the small ring.


My Shimano 600 double is 130mm by coarse measurement. The derailer would
not take anymore anyhow, front and rear derailers would need to be
replaced and then I might as well buy a whole new set. Which I might do
some day as I get older or if I start tackling steeper terrain around
here. So far I just walked up really steep parts because there is also a
high chance of snapping a spoke.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #27  
Old January 20th 18, 04:38 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,651
Default not enough standards

On Saturday, January 20, 2018 at 11:39:36 AM UTC, [email protected] wrote:
On Saturday, January 20, 2018 at 11:27:09 AM UTC+1, sms wrote:
On 1/20/2018 12:31 AM, xxxxxx wrote:
On Friday, January 19, 2018 at 5:24:15 PM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
https://cyclingindustry.news/knolly-...axle-standard/

Hell, I can remember way back when a guy could swap wheels
between two different bicycles.


--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

The last 5-10 years they lost me with their ATB's. Can't think ever buying a new ATB. I'll stick to my 26 inch wheeled Rohloff equipped ATB and ride my Cross bike more and more for off road riding.


Bolshevik.

You should have bought a 29er, then when you realized that 29 was too
big bought a 27.5er. How will our capitalist economy function if yu
don't think of buying more stuff?


Imagine that I have unlimited funds for
bike(stuff). The only requirement for me is that it has to make some kind of sense to me. Is that the case the price is irrelavant. Still ATB bike business managed in losing my interest....

Lou


Not the money but the bloody time and effort to keep all the bits fitting together. I now ride one bike at a time, and the same one for the last ten years. Before I always had a list every December of bikes that I might like, and sometimes did order, including the one I still ride from a December ten years ago, but eventually it dawned on me that there were only two bikes left in the world that I would actually want -- note that I don't even pretend I would ride them often; I just wanted them for technical interest. Those two bikes were a Pedersen and a Scooterbike (though of course not in Scooterbike's slaphappy assembly -- I wanted one when Utopia still made a sorted version). For those of you who don't know, the Kranich version of the Scooterbike was a three-quarter recliner on fat tackies with a Rohloff gearbox; it really looked the business and someone who recently rode one said that was for sale second-hand said it was comfortable too. If anyone here doesn't know what the Pedersen was, he should be ashamed of himself.

Andre Jute
Maybe I'll find someone with a NOS Laverda for sale...
  #28  
Old January 20th 18, 05:14 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,557
Default not enough standards

On 1/20/2018 10:17 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-01-20 07:53, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/20/2018 9:27 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-01-19 16:35, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/19/2018 5:45 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-01-19 14:55, sms wrote:


[...]

That said, the front shifter on my mountain bike stopped
going into high
last Saturday, and I had to buy a replacement set of
Deore
shifters, $40
from REI. I opened up the old one but it was beyond my
ability to fix
it, so yesterday I changed the front shifter. Definitely
can see the
advantage of not having the extra complexity. But on the
trail I was on,
which was not steep except for a few short stretches, I
wanted those
high gears.


Could have used the redneck shifter: A somewhat straight
piece of a small branch with a 90 degree li'l branch (or a
nail) sticking out the side. When a buddy's chain
pretzeled
and ripped off the front derailer that's how he
shifted. It
worked so well that he forgot to order a new derailer
for a
few months.



Easy; not even expensive:
http://www.abundantadventures.com/quads.html


Unfortunately though, quote "All Mountain TamerTM adapters
work with cranks having standard 74mm bolt circle (43.4mm
hole spacing) 5 bolt pattern only".

I could remove all the Shimano 600 stuff and mount other
stuff. It won't be expensive to do either but so far I have
tried to keep the old bike somewhat original.

Some day I'll have to. While right now I can still muscle up
the hills there is another more serious problem. I regularly
break spokes. The last one went on Wednesday on the last
10mi home. So I'll soon be looking for a 700c 7-speed FH
rear wheel with 12ga spokes, as many of them as possible. A
tandem wheel would be best but their rims are too wide. The
max tire width I can get in there is 25mm.


Shimano 600 FC6207 triple is indeed 74mm on the small ring.


My Shimano 600 double is 130mm by coarse measurement. The
derailer would not take anymore anyhow, front and rear
derailers would need to be replaced and then I might as well
buy a whole new set. Which I might do some day as I get
older or if I start tackling steeper terrain around here. So
far I just walked up really steep parts because there is
also a high chance of snapping a spoke.


Oh a road bike. A horse of a different color as it were.

I think I misunderstood your comment yesterday, "Even
regular 3x MTBs like mine tucker out at 28-30mph " as
referring to an MTB. Silly me.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #29  
Old January 20th 18, 06:04 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,374
Default not enough standards

Lou going to combo ?
  #30  
Old January 20th 18, 07:52 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,299
Default not enough standards

On 2018-01-20 09:14, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/20/2018 10:17 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-01-20 07:53, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/20/2018 9:27 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-01-19 16:35, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/19/2018 5:45 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-01-19 14:55, sms wrote:


[...]

That said, the front shifter on my mountain bike stopped
going into high
last Saturday, and I had to buy a replacement set of
Deore
shifters, $40
from REI. I opened up the old one but it was beyond my
ability to fix
it, so yesterday I changed the front shifter. Definitely
can see the
advantage of not having the extra complexity. But on the
trail I was on,
which was not steep except for a few short stretches, I
wanted those
high gears.


Could have used the redneck shifter: A somewhat straight
piece of a small branch with a 90 degree li'l branch (or a
nail) sticking out the side. When a buddy's chain
pretzeled
and ripped off the front derailer that's how he
shifted. It
worked so well that he forgot to order a new derailer
for a
few months.



Easy; not even expensive:
http://www.abundantadventures.com/quads.html


Unfortunately though, quote "All Mountain TamerTM adapters
work with cranks having standard 74mm bolt circle (43.4mm
hole spacing) 5 bolt pattern only".

I could remove all the Shimano 600 stuff and mount other
stuff. It won't be expensive to do either but so far I have
tried to keep the old bike somewhat original.

Some day I'll have to. While right now I can still muscle up
the hills there is another more serious problem. I regularly
break spokes. The last one went on Wednesday on the last
10mi home. So I'll soon be looking for a 700c 7-speed FH
rear wheel with 12ga spokes, as many of them as possible. A
tandem wheel would be best but their rims are too wide. The
max tire width I can get in there is 25mm.


Shimano 600 FC6207 triple is indeed 74mm on the small ring.


My Shimano 600 double is 130mm by coarse measurement. The
derailer would not take anymore anyhow, front and rear
derailers would need to be replaced and then I might as well
buy a whole new set. Which I might do some day as I get
older or if I start tackling steeper terrain around here. So
far I just walked up really steep parts because there is
also a high chance of snapping a spoke.


Oh a road bike. A horse of a different color as it were.

I think I misunderstood your comment yesterday, "Even regular 3x MTBs
like mine tucker out at 28-30mph " as referring to an MTB. Silly me.


That was in a different context. I meant that a smaller chain ring up
front (especially if there is only one) seriously crimps the usefulness
of a bike for longhaul routes. On my MTB and pretty much all others the
granularity up front is too fine, 24-32-42 or so. Beats me why they
don't provide 24-36-50.

For riding up a steep roof and such my MTB is well equipped.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 




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