A Cycling & bikes forum. CycleBanter.com

Go Back   Home » CycleBanter.com forum » rec.bicycles » Techniques
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Flat repair



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #131  
Old August 17th 18, 12:54 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,518
Default Flat repair

wrote:
On Wednesday, August 15, 2018 at 12:09:35 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/15/2018 12:39 PM, wrote:
On Wednesday, August 15, 2018 at 12:26:14 AM UTC-7, news18 wrote:
On 14/08/18 08:48,
wrote:
Obviously you like carrying around two tubes, a patch kit, two CO2
cartridges and a filler and a mini-pump because it seems romantic to you.

Speaking of weight, just how heavier are these tubeless systems compared
to the old tyre and tube system.

You are perfectly free to feel that the same technology used on every
other rubber tired vehicle in the world is not suited to bicycles but
if you're going to argue, don't use inadequate responses like "lock
you in to their products"
or "testing procedures are only for very narrow test conditions."
when this isn't the case at all. It is far easier to test bicycle
tire performance than those of a motorcycles.
+++
How many of these "every other rubber tyred vehcicles" are not driven by
an ICE or similar power plant. P.S. you can leave out shopping trolleys.
.

Why are you arguing this? Tubeless tires are missing the weight of a
tube. What's more, because the sealant is so reliable you can use
lighter racing-style tires rather than armored tires such as the
Gatorskins or the others of similar construction. The flat tests I
presented earlier was a guy riding Continental 4000's - a racing tire
that has minimal rolling resistance in the tests.


People like tubeless for some applications where they make
sense. Other people gave up on them in other applications. I
don't feel strongly either way but they are certainly no
panacea.

Regarding weight, at least for road sizes, you're using a
heavier rim liner and a heavier valve assembly plus 55~60
grams of latex to omit a 60~65 gram tube. There may be a
weight savings but it can't be significant.

People like what they like because they like it. That's
fine, and argument enough. I don't see a compelling reason
to change, certainly not from 300g tubulars. YMMV, and in
your particular case it does.

p.s. I drove a wire-wheeled car, the last 8 years with the
latest hi-zoot Pirellis and matching tubes. Worked fine. Now
that I'm a grownup, I like pressed steel wheels with
tubeless, which are lighter.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Well, I can't argue that people want to ride what they want to ride. I
just find it curious that they complain about flats and then won't change
over to a tubeless that doesn't get flats.


Huh? Last time I rode with a guy using tubeless we had to stop every 30k
to pump up his slow leak. I’m not saying tubeless suck but saying they
don’t flat is wrong.

--
duane
Ads
  #132  
Old August 17th 18, 01:39 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 144
Default Flat repair

On Thu, 16 Aug 2018 15:01:21 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

On Wednesday, August 15, 2018 at 12:49:35 PM UTC-7, John B. Slocomb wrote:

As a Sailor (live aboard for more then 10 years) I might repair a sail
with needles and thread but string is what you tie up Christmas
presents with.


I also lived aboard for a decade. I also worked on a lot of sails. I also did long distance racing on

large sailboats. I'm a life member of the second oldest yacht club on
San Francisco bay. And we always called it Sailmakers Yarn or String.
Perhaps they have different terms in Outer Mongolia. Thread is for
darning the holes in your socks.

Strange that. I can only assume that Californians are really
different. In the sail making trade "yarn" is the usual term for the
stuff that the sail is woven from.

http://www.uksailmakers.com/news/201...erforming-yarn
http://www.uksailmakers.com/encyclop...-1-sail-cloth/
http://www.sanders-sails.co.uk/materials.html

String, in reference to sails, means a totally different thing. See:
https://www.sail-world.com/Australia...?source=google

Sailmaking thread is what the industry calls the stuff you sew sails
with.
https://www.sailmakerssupply.com/cat...ad-and-needles

And finally, stockings are darned with thread, or yarn in the case of
heavy "boot socks".

But then, you really don't know do you. You just make it all up as you
go along. As they say in Outer Mongolia, a "Bull **** Boy".
  #133  
Old August 17th 18, 01:48 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 144
Default Flat repair

On Thu, 16 Aug 2018 23:02:39 -0000 (UTC), Roger Merriman
wrote:

wrote:
On Thursday, August 16, 2018 at 1:25:54 PM UTC+2, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Thu, 16 Aug 2018 02:40:52 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

On Thursday, August 16, 2018 at 10:02:24 AM UTC+2, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Wed, 15 Aug 2018 23:18:27 -0700 (PDT),
wrote:

On Thursday, August 16, 2018 at 2:16:32 AM UTC+2, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/15/2018 6:02 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/15/2018 1:39 PM,
wrote:
On Wednesday, August 15, 2018 at 12:26:14 AM UTC-7, news18
wrote:
On 14/08/18 08:48,
wrote:
Obviously you like carrying around two tubes, a patch
kit, two CO2 cartridges and a filler and a mini-pump
because it seems romantic to you.

Speaking of weight, just how heavier are these tubeless
systems compared
to the old tyre and tube system.

You are perfectly free to feel that the same technology
used on every other rubber tired vehicle in the world is
not suited to bicycles but if you're going to argue,
don't use inadequate responses like "lock you in to
their products"
or "testing procedures are only for very narrow test
conditions." when this isn't the case at all. It is far
easier to test bicycle tire performance than those of a
motorcycles.
+++
How many of these "every other rubber tyred vehcicles"
are not driven by
an ICE or similar power plant. P.S. you can leave out
shopping trolleys.
.

Why are you arguing this? Tubeless tires are missing the
weight of a tube. What's more, because the sealant is so
reliable you can use lighter racing-style tires rather
than armored tires such as the Gatorskins or the others of
similar construction. The flat tests I presented earlier
was a guy riding Continental 4000's - a racing tire that
has minimal rolling resistance in the tests.

I don't understand what you want us to do, Tom. I've got six
personal bikes plus a tandem. Oh, plus another 1930s antique
stored in the garage attic. They have five different wheel
sizes. Surely you don't want me to run out and convert them
all to tubeless?

I have no current plans to buy another bike. If I start down
that path, I might look at the issue. But I'm not seeing a
compelling advantage.

Right now, my main issue is learning how to repair them if
there is a problem, because I do get recruited to help fix
bike problems. I'm not looking forward to dealing with the
goop.


If it were possible to make a proper tubeless bcycle tire
with out goop, we'd all ride them.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

Right. Goop is the reason I not even consider tubeless. Up to the
last tire test in TOUR magazine the best tubeless tires had a higher
RR compared to the best clincher tires. Now they are on par. They are
a bit heavier and harder to mount. That would be all manageable for
me but dealing with the goop not.

Lou

But from reading posts here it seemed like the anti-flat goop was main
argument for using tubeless.

Without goop I think the chance of a pinchflat is much lower so you can
ride with lower pressures for traction reasons or comfort. That is an
advantage riding off road on a cross bike or MTB. Pinchflats on a
roadbike is a no issue for me. My flats on the roadbike are almost
exlusively caused by small glass pieces or chips of rocks. For that you
need the goop to make the tubeless tire self sealant.

Lou

Why the furor about tubeless and no flats. After all they have been
making goop to inject into tire tubes and making them self sealing for
about 30 years now. Strange that no one seems to be using that
although it is considerably cheaper - about 2.00 a wheel.


Why you ask me? Carl Fogel (how is he BTW) used that green stuff and I
didn't know anyone who patched more flats than him. I don't think that
green goop works for pinch flats. Tubeless does by default; no tube to
pinch. For road bikes pinch flats aren't a problem at least not for me.
Off road with a crossbike with 32-35 mm wide tires it is because you want
to run them at low pressure for traction. If I gonna try tubeless it will
be on my crossbike but without the goop.

Lou


Inner tubes with sealant, seem to be a bit marmite, some folks love them,
other find they simply dont work well, clearly they can pinch flat,
equally they dont seal all penetrating ones either.

Either way doesnt seem to work as well as tubeless with the sealant.

Roger Merriman



I keep reading reference to"pinch flats", but are pinch flats really
such a problem to the road rider? If memory serves I've had one pinch
flat in all the years I've been riding and that was because I didn't
check the tire pressure before I started.
  #134  
Old August 17th 18, 01:58 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,601
Default Flat repair

On 8/16/2018 6:02 PM, Roger Merriman wrote:
wrote:
On Thursday, August 16, 2018 at 1:25:54 PM UTC+2, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Thu, 16 Aug 2018 02:40:52 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

On Thursday, August 16, 2018 at 10:02:24 AM UTC+2, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Wed, 15 Aug 2018 23:18:27 -0700 (PDT),
wrote:

On Thursday, August 16, 2018 at 2:16:32 AM UTC+2, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/15/2018 6:02 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/15/2018 1:39 PM,
wrote:
On Wednesday, August 15, 2018 at 12:26:14 AM UTC-7, news18
wrote:
On 14/08/18 08:48,
wrote:
Obviously you like carrying around two tubes, a patch
kit, two CO2 cartridges and a filler and a mini-pump
because it seems romantic to you.

Speaking of weight, just how heavier are these tubeless
systems compared
to the old tyre and tube system.

You are perfectly free to feel that the same technology
used on every other rubber tired vehicle in the world is
not suited to bicycles but if you're going to argue,
don't use inadequate responses like "lock you in to
their products"
or "testing procedures are only for very narrow test
conditions." when this isn't the case at all. It is far
easier to test bicycle tire performance than those of a
motorcycles.
+++
How many of these "every other rubber tyred vehcicles"
are not driven by
an ICE or similar power plant. P.S. you can leave out
shopping trolleys.
.

Why are you arguing this? Tubeless tires are missing the
weight of a tube. What's more, because the sealant is so
reliable you can use lighter racing-style tires rather
than armored tires such as the Gatorskins or the others of
similar construction. The flat tests I presented earlier
was a guy riding Continental 4000's - a racing tire that
has minimal rolling resistance in the tests.

I don't understand what you want us to do, Tom. I've got six
personal bikes plus a tandem. Oh, plus another 1930s antique
stored in the garage attic. They have five different wheel
sizes. Surely you don't want me to run out and convert them
all to tubeless?

I have no current plans to buy another bike. If I start down
that path, I might look at the issue. But I'm not seeing a
compelling advantage.

Right now, my main issue is learning how to repair them if
there is a problem, because I do get recruited to help fix
bike problems. I'm not looking forward to dealing with the
goop.


If it were possible to make a proper tubeless bcycle tire
with out goop, we'd all ride them.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

Right. Goop is the reason I not even consider tubeless. Up to the
last tire test in TOUR magazine the best tubeless tires had a higher
RR compared to the best clincher tires. Now they are on par. They are
a bit heavier and harder to mount. That would be all manageable for
me but dealing with the goop not.

Lou

But from reading posts here it seemed like the anti-flat goop was main
argument for using tubeless.

Without goop I think the chance of a pinchflat is much lower so you can
ride with lower pressures for traction reasons or comfort. That is an
advantage riding off road on a cross bike or MTB. Pinchflats on a
roadbike is a no issue for me. My flats on the roadbike are almost
exlusively caused by small glass pieces or chips of rocks. For that you
need the goop to make the tubeless tire self sealant.

Lou

Why the furor about tubeless and no flats. After all they have been
making goop to inject into tire tubes and making them self sealing for
about 30 years now. Strange that no one seems to be using that
although it is considerably cheaper - about 2.00 a wheel.


Why you ask me? Carl Fogel (how is he BTW) used that green stuff and I
didn't know anyone who patched more flats than him. I don't think that
green goop works for pinch flats. Tubeless does by default; no tube to
pinch. For road bikes pinch flats aren't a problem at least not for me.
Off road with a crossbike with 32-35 mm wide tires it is because you want
to run them at low pressure for traction. If I gonna try tubeless it will
be on my crossbike but without the goop.

Lou


Inner tubes with sealant, seem to be a bit marmite, some folks love them,
other find they simply don’t work well, clearly they can pinch flat,
equally they don’t seal all penetrating ones either.

Either way doesn’t seem to work as well as tubeless with the sealant.

Roger Merriman


Oh, right. Sealant then. For various values of 'work' maybe.

http://forums.roadbikereview.com/att...racetracy2.jpg

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/O_StqLLpAVI/maxresdefault.jpg

http://basquemtb.basquemtb.netdna-cd...ain-bike-9.jpg

https://mountainbikingzane.files.wor.../09/burp-2.jpg

Yeah, sealant. That oughta do it. Sure.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #136  
Old August 17th 18, 03:51 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,466
Default Flat repair

On 8/16/2018 5:50 PM, wrote:
On Wednesday, August 15, 2018 at 12:09:35 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/15/2018 12:39 PM,
wrote:
On Wednesday, August 15, 2018 at 12:26:14 AM UTC-7, news18 wrote:
On 14/08/18 08:48,
wrote:
Obviously you like carrying around two tubes, a patch kit, two CO2 cartridges and a filler and a mini-pump because it seems romantic to you.

Speaking of weight, just how heavier are these tubeless systems compared
to the old tyre and tube system.

You are perfectly free to feel that the same technology used on every other rubber tired vehicle in the world is not suited to bicycles but if you're going to argue, don't use inadequate responses like "lock you in to their products"
or "testing procedures are only for very narrow test conditions." when this isn't the case at all. It is far easier to test bicycle tire performance than those of a motorcycles.
+++
How many of these "every other rubber tyred vehcicles" are not driven by
an ICE or similar power plant. P.S. you can leave out shopping trolleys.
.

Why are you arguing this? Tubeless tires are missing the weight of a tube. What's more, because the sealant is so reliable you can use lighter racing-style tires rather than armored tires such as the Gatorskins or the others of similar construction. The flat tests I presented earlier was a guy riding Continental 4000's - a racing tire that has minimal rolling resistance in the tests.


People like tubeless for some applications where they make
sense. Other people gave up on them in other applications. I
don't feel strongly either way but they are certainly no
panacea.

Regarding weight, at least for road sizes, you're using a
heavier rim liner and a heavier valve assembly plus 55~60
grams of latex to omit a 60~65 gram tube. There may be a
weight savings but it can't be significant.

People like what they like because they like it. That's
fine, and argument enough. I don't see a compelling reason
to change, certainly not from 300g tubulars. YMMV, and in
your particular case it does.

p.s. I drove a wire-wheeled car, the last 8 years with the
latest hi-zoot Pirellis and matching tubes. Worked fine. Now
that I'm a grownup, I like pressed steel wheels with
tubeless, which are lighter.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Well, I can't argue that people want to ride what they want to ride. I just find it curious that they complain about flats and then won't change over to a tubeless that doesn't get flats.


The way I complain about flats is by saying "I got a flat." After that,
I may say "So I fixed it."

My last flat was on a club ride on our tandem, about two weeks ago.
Someone said "Good thing it was Frank who got the flat. It won't take
him long to fix it."

--
- Frank Krygowski

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

  #137  
Old August 17th 18, 04:06 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,466
Default Flat repair

On 8/16/2018 8:48 PM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Thu, 16 Aug 2018 23:02:39 -0000 (UTC), Roger Merriman
wrote:

wrote:
On Thursday, August 16, 2018 at 1:25:54 PM UTC+2, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Thu, 16 Aug 2018 02:40:52 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

On Thursday, August 16, 2018 at 10:02:24 AM UTC+2, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Wed, 15 Aug 2018 23:18:27 -0700 (PDT),
wrote:

On Thursday, August 16, 2018 at 2:16:32 AM UTC+2, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/15/2018 6:02 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/15/2018 1:39 PM,
wrote:
On Wednesday, August 15, 2018 at 12:26:14 AM UTC-7, news18
wrote:
On 14/08/18 08:48,
wrote:
Obviously you like carrying around two tubes, a patch
kit, two CO2 cartridges and a filler and a mini-pump
because it seems romantic to you.

Speaking of weight, just how heavier are these tubeless
systems compared
to the old tyre and tube system.

You are perfectly free to feel that the same technology
used on every other rubber tired vehicle in the world is
not suited to bicycles but if you're going to argue,
don't use inadequate responses like "lock you in to
their products"
or "testing procedures are only for very narrow test
conditions." when this isn't the case at all. It is far
easier to test bicycle tire performance than those of a
motorcycles.
+++
How many of these "every other rubber tyred vehcicles"
are not driven by
an ICE or similar power plant. P.S. you can leave out
shopping trolleys.
.

Why are you arguing this? Tubeless tires are missing the
weight of a tube. What's more, because the sealant is so
reliable you can use lighter racing-style tires rather
than armored tires such as the Gatorskins or the others of
similar construction. The flat tests I presented earlier
was a guy riding Continental 4000's - a racing tire that
has minimal rolling resistance in the tests.

I don't understand what you want us to do, Tom. I've got six
personal bikes plus a tandem. Oh, plus another 1930s antique
stored in the garage attic. They have five different wheel
sizes. Surely you don't want me to run out and convert them
all to tubeless?

I have no current plans to buy another bike. If I start down
that path, I might look at the issue. But I'm not seeing a
compelling advantage.

Right now, my main issue is learning how to repair them if
there is a problem, because I do get recruited to help fix
bike problems. I'm not looking forward to dealing with the
goop.


If it were possible to make a proper tubeless bcycle tire
with out goop, we'd all ride them.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

Right. Goop is the reason I not even consider tubeless. Up to the
last tire test in TOUR magazine the best tubeless tires had a higher
RR compared to the best clincher tires. Now they are on par. They are
a bit heavier and harder to mount. That would be all manageable for
me but dealing with the goop not.

Lou

But from reading posts here it seemed like the anti-flat goop was main
argument for using tubeless.

Without goop I think the chance of a pinchflat is much lower so you can
ride with lower pressures for traction reasons or comfort. That is an
advantage riding off road on a cross bike or MTB. Pinchflats on a
roadbike is a no issue for me. My flats on the roadbike are almost
exlusively caused by small glass pieces or chips of rocks. For that you
need the goop to make the tubeless tire self sealant.

Lou

Why the furor about tubeless and no flats. After all they have been
making goop to inject into tire tubes and making them self sealing for
about 30 years now. Strange that no one seems to be using that
although it is considerably cheaper - about 2.00 a wheel.

Why you ask me? Carl Fogel (how is he BTW) used that green stuff and I
didn't know anyone who patched more flats than him. I don't think that
green goop works for pinch flats. Tubeless does by default; no tube to
pinch. For road bikes pinch flats aren't a problem at least not for me.
Off road with a crossbike with 32-35 mm wide tires it is because you want
to run them at low pressure for traction. If I gonna try tubeless it will
be on my crossbike but without the goop.

Lou


Inner tubes with sealant, seem to be a bit marmite, some folks love them,
other find they simply don’t work well, clearly they can pinch flat,
equally they don’t seal all penetrating ones either.

Either way doesn’t seem to work as well as tubeless with the sealant.

Roger Merriman



I keep reading reference to"pinch flats", but are pinch flats really
such a problem to the road rider? If memory serves I've had one pinch
flat in all the years I've been riding and that was because I didn't
check the tire pressure before I started.


Are pinch flats such a problem? Well, not much, but occasionally. My
last two flats were. The one on the tandem came from a pothole on a fast
downhill in dappled sunlight. I never saw it until a quarter second
before I hit it. It caused a slow leak, noticed only when the bike felt
squirrelly about five miles later. IIRC, that's the only pinch flat
we've ever had on the tandem.

The other pinch flat was on my utility bike. They're in the process of
paving a highway that I cross coming home with groceries. The road's
been scarfed, leaving a very sharp 1" "curb" up to the level of the
unscarfed side street. I suppose my tire pressure might have been a
little low, and I know the $100 worth of groceries didn't help matters.

But no, I usually get very few pinch flats. I tend to watch the road
surface a lot, especially on the tandem. The stoker prefers warnings
before bumps.

She gets to look at scenery. I get to look for potholes.

--
- Frank Krygowski

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

  #138  
Old August 17th 18, 08:12 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 450
Default Flat repair

On Friday, August 17, 2018 at 4:51:56 AM UTC+2, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/16/2018 5:50 PM, wrote:
On Wednesday, August 15, 2018 at 12:09:35 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/15/2018 12:39 PM,
wrote:
On Wednesday, August 15, 2018 at 12:26:14 AM UTC-7, news18 wrote:
On 14/08/18 08:48,
wrote:
Obviously you like carrying around two tubes, a patch kit, two CO2 cartridges and a filler and a mini-pump because it seems romantic to you.

Speaking of weight, just how heavier are these tubeless systems compared
to the old tyre and tube system.

You are perfectly free to feel that the same technology used on every other rubber tired vehicle in the world is not suited to bicycles but if you're going to argue, don't use inadequate responses like "lock you in to their products"
or "testing procedures are only for very narrow test conditions.." when this isn't the case at all. It is far easier to test bicycle tire performance than those of a motorcycles.
+++
How many of these "every other rubber tyred vehcicles" are not driven by
an ICE or similar power plant. P.S. you can leave out shopping trolleys.
.

Why are you arguing this? Tubeless tires are missing the weight of a tube. What's more, because the sealant is so reliable you can use lighter racing-style tires rather than armored tires such as the Gatorskins or the others of similar construction. The flat tests I presented earlier was a guy riding Continental 4000's - a racing tire that has minimal rolling resistance in the tests.


People like tubeless for some applications where they make
sense. Other people gave up on them in other applications. I
don't feel strongly either way but they are certainly no
panacea.

Regarding weight, at least for road sizes, you're using a
heavier rim liner and a heavier valve assembly plus 55~60
grams of latex to omit a 60~65 gram tube. There may be a
weight savings but it can't be significant.

People like what they like because they like it. That's
fine, and argument enough. I don't see a compelling reason
to change, certainly not from 300g tubulars. YMMV, and in
your particular case it does.

p.s. I drove a wire-wheeled car, the last 8 years with the
latest hi-zoot Pirellis and matching tubes. Worked fine. Now
that I'm a grownup, I like pressed steel wheels with
tubeless, which are lighter.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Well, I can't argue that people want to ride what they want to ride. I just find it curious that they complain about flats and then won't change over to a tubeless that doesn't get flats.


The way I complain about flats is by saying "I got a flat." After that,
I may say "So I fixed it."

My last flat was on a club ride on our tandem, about two weeks ago.
Someone said "Good thing it was Frank who got the flat. It won't take
him long to fix it."

--
- Frank Krygowski

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Fixing a flat is a social event in our group ;-)

https://photos.app.goo.gl/JVnGFRNXqRX4mxmJ6

Lou
  #139  
Old August 17th 18, 09:38 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 144
Default Flat repair

On Thu, 16 Aug 2018 23:06:56 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 8/16/2018 8:48 PM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Thu, 16 Aug 2018 23:02:39 -0000 (UTC), Roger Merriman
wrote:

wrote:
On Thursday, August 16, 2018 at 1:25:54 PM UTC+2, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Thu, 16 Aug 2018 02:40:52 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

On Thursday, August 16, 2018 at 10:02:24 AM UTC+2, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Wed, 15 Aug 2018 23:18:27 -0700 (PDT),
wrote:

On Thursday, August 16, 2018 at 2:16:32 AM UTC+2, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/15/2018 6:02 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/15/2018 1:39 PM,
wrote:
On Wednesday, August 15, 2018 at 12:26:14 AM UTC-7, news18
wrote:
On 14/08/18 08:48,
wrote:
Obviously you like carrying around two tubes, a patch
kit, two CO2 cartridges and a filler and a mini-pump
because it seems romantic to you.

Speaking of weight, just how heavier are these tubeless
systems compared
to the old tyre and tube system.

You are perfectly free to feel that the same technology
used on every other rubber tired vehicle in the world is
not suited to bicycles but if you're going to argue,
don't use inadequate responses like "lock you in to
their products"
or "testing procedures are only for very narrow test
conditions." when this isn't the case at all. It is far
easier to test bicycle tire performance than those of a
motorcycles.
+++
How many of these "every other rubber tyred vehcicles"
are not driven by
an ICE or similar power plant. P.S. you can leave out
shopping trolleys.
.

Why are you arguing this? Tubeless tires are missing the
weight of a tube. What's more, because the sealant is so
reliable you can use lighter racing-style tires rather
than armored tires such as the Gatorskins or the others of
similar construction. The flat tests I presented earlier
was a guy riding Continental 4000's - a racing tire that
has minimal rolling resistance in the tests.

I don't understand what you want us to do, Tom. I've got six
personal bikes plus a tandem. Oh, plus another 1930s antique
stored in the garage attic. They have five different wheel
sizes. Surely you don't want me to run out and convert them
all to tubeless?

I have no current plans to buy another bike. If I start down
that path, I might look at the issue. But I'm not seeing a
compelling advantage.

Right now, my main issue is learning how to repair them if
there is a problem, because I do get recruited to help fix
bike problems. I'm not looking forward to dealing with the
goop.


If it were possible to make a proper tubeless bcycle tire
with out goop, we'd all ride them.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

Right. Goop is the reason I not even consider tubeless. Up to the
last tire test in TOUR magazine the best tubeless tires had a higher
RR compared to the best clincher tires. Now they are on par. They are
a bit heavier and harder to mount. That would be all manageable for
me but dealing with the goop not.

Lou

But from reading posts here it seemed like the anti-flat goop was main
argument for using tubeless.

Without goop I think the chance of a pinchflat is much lower so you can
ride with lower pressures for traction reasons or comfort. That is an
advantage riding off road on a cross bike or MTB. Pinchflats on a
roadbike is a no issue for me. My flats on the roadbike are almost
exlusively caused by small glass pieces or chips of rocks. For that you
need the goop to make the tubeless tire self sealant.

Lou

Why the furor about tubeless and no flats. After all they have been
making goop to inject into tire tubes and making them self sealing for
about 30 years now. Strange that no one seems to be using that
although it is considerably cheaper - about 2.00 a wheel.

Why you ask me? Carl Fogel (how is he BTW) used that green stuff and I
didn't know anyone who patched more flats than him. I don't think that
green goop works for pinch flats. Tubeless does by default; no tube to
pinch. For road bikes pinch flats aren't a problem at least not for me.
Off road with a crossbike with 32-35 mm wide tires it is because you want
to run them at low pressure for traction. If I gonna try tubeless it will
be on my crossbike but without the goop.

Lou


Inner tubes with sealant, seem to be a bit marmite, some folks love them,
other find they simply dont work well, clearly they can pinch flat,
equally they dont seal all penetrating ones either.

Either way doesnt seem to work as well as tubeless with the sealant.

Roger Merriman



I keep reading reference to"pinch flats", but are pinch flats really
such a problem to the road rider? If memory serves I've had one pinch
flat in all the years I've been riding and that was because I didn't
check the tire pressure before I started.


Are pinch flats such a problem? Well, not much, but occasionally. My
last two flats were. The one on the tandem came from a pothole on a fast
downhill in dappled sunlight. I never saw it until a quarter second
before I hit it. It caused a slow leak, noticed only when the bike felt
squirrelly about five miles later. IIRC, that's the only pinch flat
we've ever had on the tandem.

The other pinch flat was on my utility bike. They're in the process of
paving a highway that I cross coming home with groceries. The road's
been scarfed, leaving a very sharp 1" "curb" up to the level of the
unscarfed side street. I suppose my tire pressure might have been a
little low, and I know the $100 worth of groceries didn't help matters.

But no, I usually get very few pinch flats. I tend to watch the road
surface a lot, especially on the tandem. The stoker prefers warnings
before bumps.

She gets to look at scenery. I get to look for potholes.


I suspect that is why I have so few pinch flats. I do watch the road,
closely, and might even slow down if I can't avoid something with
sharp edges.

We don't have many potholes here but we do have a lot of storm drains
which range from, oh say 3 ft x 3 ft to 10 ft x 10 ft and most of
them, after years of use, repaveing and repaveing don't fit flush and
present a nice sharp edge to the oncoming wheel. I slow down.
  #140  
Old August 17th 18, 09:59 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,394
Default Flat repair

On Friday, August 17, 2018 at 4:38:15 AM UTC-4, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Thu, 16 Aug 2018 23:06:56 -0400, Frank Krygowski

Snipped
She gets to look at scenery. I get to look for potholes.


I suspect that is why I have so few pinch flats. I do watch the road,
closely, and might even slow down if I can't avoid something with
sharp edges.

We don't have many potholes here but we do have a lot of storm drains
which range from, oh say 3 ft x 3 ft to 10 ft x 10 ft and most of
them, after years of use, repaveing and repaveing don't fit flush and
present a nice sharp edge to the oncoming wheel. I slow down.


Heavens to Sweet Betsey! You mean people should reduce speed and ride at a speed that matches the road/trail/path conditions? What a novel concept. VBEG LOL

Unfortunately for many other users of those same areas, many bicyclist want to "bomb" along at top speed. When I tour on those old fire/logging/mining roads I keep my speed to what enables me to maintain control of my bicycle and also to see what's on the road/trail up ahead. I'd hate to blow out a tire 40 miles or so from anywhere someone might see me for days. Perhaps because I ride aware of my surroundings and reduce my speed when needed is the reason why I don't get pinch-flats or slice my tires when I tour. I do carry a folding spare tire as a just in case though because what I can ride in a day might take close to a week to walk pushing a loaded bicycle. Other peoples' mileage might and probably does vary.

Cheers
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Possible to repair a flat-spot (kerb hit) on rear rim? waldspirale UK 5 April 30th 07 10:32 PM
Pinch flat repair? MuniAddict Unicycling 8 March 11th 07 07:33 AM
Pinch flat repair? MuniAddict Unicycling 0 March 11th 07 02:36 AM
Pinch flat repair? zfreak220 Unicycling 0 March 11th 07 02:29 AM
Flat tire repair. Arne Recumbent Biking 13 August 19th 04 03:39 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:01 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 CycleBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.