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Darn near lost my sole early this morning!



 
 
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  #11  
Old August 22nd 19, 12:46 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
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Posts: 787
Default Darn near lost my sole early this morning!

On Wednesday, August 21, 2019 at 12:46:14 PM UTC-7, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, 19 August 2019 16:42:15 UTC-4, wrote:
On Monday, August 19, 2019 at 6:11:33 AM UTC-4, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
Very early this morning I put Look Delta cleats onto my Louis Garneau road-bicycling shoes and then went for a ride of just over a kilometer to go to a store and to test the placement of the cleats because I'm going on a long ride later this morning.

Everything was fine until I unclipped my left foot. This is what I found when i looked at the bottom of my shoe because the shoe was making a rather loud clacking noise with every step.

https://flic.kr/p/2h1jKEy

I was NOT a happy bicyclist then.

Fortunately the checkout clerk at the store found a heavy-duty rubber band she then gave me and that I was able to wrap around the shoe. With that I was at least able to ride home.

This is not the first Louis Garneau product that has failed me rather early in its life but it is the last one. I'm done with Louis Garneau stuff. It's not cheap as far as prices go buy it's cheap quality. I was amazed at how little glue was use to attach the some to the rest of the shoe. Right now the show is heavily clamped with two big clamps and a bunch of nylon toe-straps whilst the Gorilla Glue I used to try and reattach the sole to the shoe fully cures which is stated to be in 24 hours. It's a good thing I have a pair of vintage Adidas Eddy Merckx Competition Shoes I was able to put another pair of Look Delta cleats on so I can use those shoes for today's ride.

In my experience and in my honest opinion Louis Garneau quality has plummeted and I've decided that today was the last straw and I'm done with this brand of bicycling gear. My Adidas Eddy Merckx shoes were bought in 1986 and I had the bicycle shop drill them for the Look Delta cleats at the time when I bought them and those shoes are still going strong.

Cheers


I've repaired two pair of stiff-soled shoes with JB weld two-part epoxy.. One was a DMX Carbon, and the other was a Northwave Carbon. I got several more years out of both pair.


The Gorilla Glue repaired shoe is holding up so far which is a good thing because today the right sole separated from most of the right show. The only reason neither sole came off completely is that there are two rives through the heel/sole of the shoes.

Just for fun I'm going to send an image of the shoes with separated soles, to Louis Garneau.

Cheers


In general two part epoxy glue works better since it is thinner until it catalyzes and spreads about more thoroughly.

I think you missed the "soul" joke. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cEXhZ8PwM-Y
Ads
  #12  
Old August 22nd 19, 12:54 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,821
Default Darn near lost my sole early this morning!

On 2019-08-21 16:06, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Wednesday, 21 August 2019 15:58:06 UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-08-19 03:11, Sir Ridesalot wrote:


[...]

... It's a good thing I have a pair of vintage Adidas Eddy Merckx
Competition Shoes I was able to put another pair of Look Delta
cleats on so I can use those shoes for today's ride.

In my experience and in my honest opinion Louis Garneau quality
has plummeted and I've decided that today was the last straw and
I'm done with this brand of bicycling gear. My Adidas Eddy Merckx
shoes were bought in 1986 and I had the bicycle shop drill them
for the Look Delta cleats at the time when I bought them and
those shoes are still going strong.


Wow, but they must smell pretty bad by now :-)

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


The Gorilla Glue is FAR superior to Shoe Goo. I've use Shoe Goo on
regular shoes in the past and they didn't last long.


Is it also better than E6000? I need to buy some more now since the
ortho boot and also my MTB shoes are coming apart and if Gorilla Glue is
better than E6000 I'd buy that instead. In my case it has to work for
very flexible joints (sneakers, sports shoes, not rigid cleats stuff).


My 35 or so years old Adidas Eddy Merckx shoes don't smell at all.
that's because they don't have a nose. LOL VBEG


Ok, let me re-word that. Any sort of emanating stench? :-)

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #13  
Old August 22nd 19, 12:55 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,607
Default Darn near lost my sole early this morning!

On 8/21/2019 7:06 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Wednesday, 21 August 2019 15:58:06 UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-08-19 03:11, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
Very early this morning I put Look Delta cleats onto my Louis Garneau
road-bicycling shoes and then went for a ride of just over a
kilometer to go to a store and to test the placement of the cleats
because I'm going on a long ride later this morning.

Everything was fine until I unclipped my left foot. This is what I
found when i looked at the bottom of my shoe because the shoe was
making a rather loud clacking noise with every step.

https://flic.kr/p/2h1jKEy

I was NOT a happy bicyclist then.


Just imagine it coming off during a hard-pedal section.


Fortunately the checkout clerk at the store found a heavy-duty rubber
band she then gave me and that I was able to wrap around the shoe.
With that I was at least able to ride home.

This is not the first Louis Garneau product that has failed me rather
early in its life but it is the last one. I'm done with Louis Garneau
stuff. It's not cheap as far as prices go buy it's cheap quality. I
was amazed at how little glue was use to attach the some to the rest
of the shoe. Right now the show is heavily clamped with two big
clamps and a bunch of nylon toe-straps whilst the Gorilla Glue I used
to try and reattach the sole to the shoe fully cures which is stated
to be in 24 hours.



Aren't you supposed to use E6000 or Shoe Goo for that job? I believe
there are some plastics that Gorilla Glue does not adhere to very well,
otherwise being a good product.

I'll have to do something similar now because I completely wore down the
sole of the orthopedic boot after my last bicycle crash. Those things
don't even last 50 miles.


... It's a good thing I have a pair of vintage Adidas
Eddy Merckx Competition Shoes I was able to put another pair of Look
Delta cleats on so I can use those shoes for today's ride.

In my experience and in my honest opinion Louis Garneau quality has
plummeted and I've decided that today was the last straw and I'm done
with this brand of bicycling gear. My Adidas Eddy Merckx shoes were
bought in 1986 and I had the bicycle shop drill them for the Look
Delta cleats at the time when I bought them and those shoes are still
going strong.


Wow, but they must smell pretty bad by now :-)

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


The Gorilla Glue is FAR superior to Shoe Goo. I've use Shoe Goo on regular shoes in the past and they didn't last long.


+1


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #14  
Old August 22nd 19, 03:33 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,098
Default Darn near lost my sole early this morning!

On Wed, 21 Aug 2019 16:54:57 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

Is it also better than E6000? I need to buy some more now since the
ortho boot and also my MTB shoes are coming apart and if Gorilla Glue is
better than E6000 I'd buy that instead. In my case it has to work for
very flexible joints (sneakers, sports shoes, not rigid cleats stuff).


I've been using a glue that is no longer easily available called
Awesome Goo. I found this on Amazon, which is probably old stock (at
least 8 years old).
https://www.amazon.com/Awesome-Goo-CECOMINOD023727/dp/B003EB51CY
Notice the photos of the shoe repairs on the left. I've been doing
something similar with good results. Here's my rather sloppy
microphone cable repair:
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/awesome-goo/mic-before.jpg
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/awesome-goo/mic-after.jpg
I think it's a urethane based goo, similar to Gorilla Glue.

When I ran out of Awesome Goo, I switched to hot melt glue:
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/pics/hot-melt-glue/hot-melt-glue-shoe-01.jpg
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/pics/hot-melt-glue/hot-melt-glue-shoe-02.jpg
It worked tolerably well, but not as well as Awesome Goo. Those are
Wolverine Cirrus 6" aluminum toe work boots, which I wear daily.

E6000 and Chinese clones are single part epoxy dissolved in some kind
of solvent. It used to be tetrachloroethylene (PERC) and polymerized
styrene butadiene (SBR) rubber. I don't know what's being used in
place of the PERC VoC which is banned in California. The original
E6000 is by Eclectic Products, which makes many formulations and
variation, all with basically the same name for optimum confusion:
http://eclecticproducts.com/products/e6000/
http://eclecticproducts.com/downloads/tds-e6000-craft-english.pdf
Notice the section on solvents that will dissolve E6000, and that it
really does take 24 hrs to cure.

About 6 months ago, I bought an assortment of E6000, B6000, B7000,
F6000, on eBay in small tubes to see how well or badly they worked for
various projects. In general, I verified most of the assertions found
in this article.
https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-difference-between-E6000-F6000-B6000-B7000-and-similar-glues
Except for B7000, they're mostly identical. I ended up stocking up on
the original in small tubes:
http://eclecticproducts.com/products/e6000/e6000-mini-tubes.html
I haven't tried them on shoes or shoe soles.

For shoe soles, I've done well with WeldWood Contact Cement.
https://www.dap.com/dap-products-ph/weldwood-contact-cement/
It's fast, fairly easy to apply, and dries almost instantly when the
sole and the shoe come in contact. The catch is you have one shot at
getting it right as it's almost impossible to separate the sole and
shoe if you miss. It also reeks for a few days, but eventually goes
away. Selection of this contact cement was fairly easy for me. I
inherited 2 gallon cans of the stuff from a former customer, so I just
had to try it everything possible.


--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #15  
Old August 22nd 19, 03:48 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,098
Default Darn near lost my sole early this morning!

On Wed, 21 Aug 2019 19:33:35 -0700, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:

E6000 and Chinese clones are single part epoxy dissolved in some kind
of solvent. It used to be tetrachloroethylene (PERC) and polymerized
styrene butadiene (SBR) rubber.


Oops, that's wrong. It's a styrene butadiene block copolymer (SBC)
rubber compound. This is the stuff:
https://adhesives.specialchem.com/selection-guide/styrene-butadiene-copolymer-resins
https://adhesives.specialchem.com/product-categories/polymers-styrene-block-copolymers-sbc-sbs-sebs-seps-sis
https://adhesives.specialchem.com/tech-library/article/the-styrene-butadiene-copolymer-platform-for-adhesive-formulation-and-development

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #16  
Old August 22nd 19, 03:07 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,821
Default Darn near lost my sole early this morning!

On 2019-08-21 19:33, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Wed, 21 Aug 2019 16:54:57 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

Is it also better than E6000? I need to buy some more now since the
ortho boot and also my MTB shoes are coming apart and if Gorilla Glue is
better than E6000 I'd buy that instead. In my case it has to work for
very flexible joints (sneakers, sports shoes, not rigid cleats stuff).


I've been using a glue that is no longer easily available called
Awesome Goo. I found this on Amazon, which is probably old stock (at
least 8 years old).
https://www.amazon.com/Awesome-Goo-CECOMINOD023727/dp/B003EB51CY
Notice the photos of the shoe repairs on the left. I've been doing
something similar with good results. Here's my rather sloppy
microphone cable repair:
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/awesome-goo/mic-before.jpg
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/awesome-goo/mic-after.jpg
I think it's a urethane based goo, similar to Gorilla Glue.


Let's call that "free-form art" :-)


When I ran out of Awesome Goo, I switched to hot melt glue:
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/pics/hot-melt-glue/hot-melt-glue-shoe-01.jpg
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/pics/hot-melt-glue/hot-melt-glue-shoe-02.jpg
It worked tolerably well, but not as well as Awesome Goo. Those are
Wolverine Cirrus 6" aluminum toe work boots, which I wear daily.


My experience with hot-melt glues of various kinds is generally quite bad.


E6000 and Chinese clones are single part epoxy dissolved in some kind
of solvent. It used to be tetrachloroethylene (PERC) and polymerized
styrene butadiene (SBR) rubber. I don't know what's being used in
place of the PERC VoC which is banned in California. The original
E6000 is by Eclectic Products, which makes many formulations and
variation, all with basically the same name for optimum confusion:
http://eclecticproducts.com/products/e6000/
http://eclecticproducts.com/downloads/tds-e6000-craft-english.pdf
Notice the section on solvents that will dissolve E6000, and that it
really does take 24 hrs to cure.

About 6 months ago, I bought an assortment of E6000, B6000, B7000,
F6000, on eBay in small tubes to see how well or badly they worked for
various projects. In general, I verified most of the assertions found
in this article.
https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-difference-between-E6000-F6000-B6000-B7000-and-similar-glues
Except for B7000, they're mostly identical. I ended up stocking up on
the original in small tubes:
http://eclecticproducts.com/products/e6000/e6000-mini-tubes.html
I haven't tried them on shoes or shoe soles.


I read up on it some more and found that E6000 supposedly beats Gorilla
Glue when it comes to remaining very flexible. Most of my shoes break in
the front on on teh sides and they do not have rigid soles like some
cycling shoes do. So the glued joint will flex with every step and I
walk at least 2-3mi per day aside from cycling.


For shoe soles, I've done well with WeldWood Contact Cement.
https://www.dap.com/dap-products-ph/weldwood-contact-cement/
It's fast, fairly easy to apply, and dries almost instantly when the
sole and the shoe come in contact. The catch is you have one shot at
getting it right as it's almost impossible to separate the sole and
shoe if you miss. It also reeks for a few days, but eventually goes
away. Selection of this contact cement was fairly easy for me. I
inherited 2 gallon cans of the stuff from a former customer, so I just
had to try it everything possible.


Impossible to separate sounds good. I'd be ok with having only one
chance at it. Most of the time such shoes have little residual value and
it's just to eke another few hundred miles of walking out of them. Until
they really break down.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #17  
Old August 22nd 19, 03:14 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,183
Default Darn near lost my sole early this morning!

On Thursday, August 22, 2019 at 7:07:52 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-08-21 19:33, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Wed, 21 Aug 2019 16:54:57 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

Is it also better than E6000? I need to buy some more now since the
ortho boot and also my MTB shoes are coming apart and if Gorilla Glue is
better than E6000 I'd buy that instead. In my case it has to work for
very flexible joints (sneakers, sports shoes, not rigid cleats stuff).


I've been using a glue that is no longer easily available called
Awesome Goo. I found this on Amazon, which is probably old stock (at
least 8 years old).
https://www.amazon.com/Awesome-Goo-CECOMINOD023727/dp/B003EB51CY
Notice the photos of the shoe repairs on the left. I've been doing
something similar with good results. Here's my rather sloppy
microphone cable repair:
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/awesome-goo/mic-before.jpg
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/awesome-goo/mic-after.jpg
I think it's a urethane based goo, similar to Gorilla Glue.


Let's call that "free-form art" :-)


When I ran out of Awesome Goo, I switched to hot melt glue:
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/pics/hot-melt-glue/hot-melt-glue-shoe-01.jpg
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/pics/hot-melt-glue/hot-melt-glue-shoe-02.jpg
It worked tolerably well, but not as well as Awesome Goo. Those are
Wolverine Cirrus 6" aluminum toe work boots, which I wear daily.


My experience with hot-melt glues of various kinds is generally quite bad..


E6000 and Chinese clones are single part epoxy dissolved in some kind
of solvent. It used to be tetrachloroethylene (PERC) and polymerized
styrene butadiene (SBR) rubber. I don't know what's being used in
place of the PERC VoC which is banned in California. The original
E6000 is by Eclectic Products, which makes many formulations and
variation, all with basically the same name for optimum confusion:
http://eclecticproducts.com/products/e6000/
http://eclecticproducts.com/downloads/tds-e6000-craft-english.pdf
Notice the section on solvents that will dissolve E6000, and that it
really does take 24 hrs to cure.

About 6 months ago, I bought an assortment of E6000, B6000, B7000,
F6000, on eBay in small tubes to see how well or badly they worked for
various projects. In general, I verified most of the assertions found
in this article.
https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-difference-between-E6000-F6000-B6000-B7000-and-similar-glues
Except for B7000, they're mostly identical. I ended up stocking up on
the original in small tubes:
http://eclecticproducts.com/products/e6000/e6000-mini-tubes.html
I haven't tried them on shoes or shoe soles.


I read up on it some more and found that E6000 supposedly beats Gorilla
Glue when it comes to remaining very flexible. Most of my shoes break in
the front on on teh sides and they do not have rigid soles like some
cycling shoes do. So the glued joint will flex with every step and I
walk at least 2-3mi per day aside from cycling.


The E6000 is well reviewed. I've used a product called GFlex https://www.westsystem.com/specialty...poxy-adhesive/ -- a two part epoxy that I originally purchased to fix my son's GS skis which had a tendency to delaminate. I needed something strong and flexible. It's probably a little over-the-top for shoe repair, but it works well.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #18  
Old August 23rd 19, 03:33 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,821
Default Darn near lost my sole early this morning!

On 2019-08-22 07:14, jbeattie wrote:
On Thursday, August 22, 2019 at 7:07:52 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-08-21 19:33, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Wed, 21 Aug 2019 16:54:57 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

Is it also better than E6000? I need to buy some more now since
the ortho boot and also my MTB shoes are coming apart and if
Gorilla Glue is better than E6000 I'd buy that instead. In my
case it has to work for very flexible joints (sneakers, sports
shoes, not rigid cleats stuff).

I've been using a glue that is no longer easily available called
Awesome Goo. I found this on Amazon, which is probably old stock
(at least 8 years old).
https://www.amazon.com/Awesome-Goo-CECOMINOD023727/dp/B003EB51CY


Notice the photos of the shoe repairs on the left. I've been doing
something similar with good results. Here's my rather sloppy
microphone cable repair:
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/awesome-goo/mic-before.jpg


http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/awesome-goo/mic-after.jpg
I think it's a urethane based goo, similar to Gorilla Glue.


Let's call that "free-form art" :-)


When I ran out of Awesome Goo, I switched to hot melt glue:
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/pics/hot-melt-glue/hot-melt-glue-shoe-01.jpg


http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/pics/hot-melt-glue/hot-melt-glue-shoe-02.jpg
It worked tolerably well, but not as well as Awesome Goo. Those
are Wolverine Cirrus 6" aluminum toe work boots, which I wear
daily.


My experience with hot-melt glues of various kinds is generally
quite bad.


E6000 and Chinese clones are single part epoxy dissolved in some
kind of solvent. It used to be tetrachloroethylene (PERC) and
polymerized styrene butadiene (SBR) rubber. I don't know what's
being used in place of the PERC VoC which is banned in
California. The original E6000 is by Eclectic Products, which
makes many formulations and variation, all with basically the
same name for optimum confusion:
http://eclecticproducts.com/products/e6000/
http://eclecticproducts.com/downloads/tds-e6000-craft-english.pdf


Notice the section on solvents that will dissolve E6000, and that it
really does take 24 hrs to cure.

About 6 months ago, I bought an assortment of E6000, B6000,
B7000, F6000, on eBay in small tubes to see how well or badly
they worked for various projects. In general, I verified most of
the assertions found in this article.
https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-difference-between-E6000-F6000-B6000-B7000-and-similar-glues


Except for B7000, they're mostly identical. I ended up stocking up on
the original in small tubes:
http://eclecticproducts.com/products/e6000/e6000-mini-tubes.html


I haven't tried them on shoes or shoe soles.


I read up on it some more and found that E6000 supposedly beats
Gorilla Glue when it comes to remaining very flexible. Most of my
shoes break in the front on on teh sides and they do not have rigid
soles like some cycling shoes do. So the glued joint will flex with
every step and I walk at least 2-3mi per day aside from cycling.


The E6000 is well reviewed. I've used a product called GFlex
https://www.westsystem.com/specialty...poxy-adhesive/
-- a two part epoxy that I originally purchased to fix my son's GS
skis which had a tendency to delaminate. I needed something strong
and flexible. It's probably a little over-the-top for shoe repair,
but it works well.


Two-part epoxies are usually best. They also have a lower chance of
drying out, gumming up or becoming compromised otherwise. Thanks for the
hint.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #19  
Old August 24th 19, 10:02 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Mark J.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 562
Default Darn near lost my sole early this morning!

On 8/21/2019 4:09 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/21/2019 3:46 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:


The Gorilla Glue repaired shoe is holding up so far which is a* good
thing because today the right sole separated from most of the right
show. The only reason neither sole came off completely is that there
are two rives through the heel/sole of the shoes.


FWIW: My wife was on a hike with a friend and lost the lugged sole of
her hiking boot.

I searched online for recommended cements, and the recommendation I got
most was to use Barge Cement. That's a brand name. I was able to find
Barge Cement only online, through Ebay IIRC.

I can't guarantee it's best, but the repair has held up through quite a
bit of winter walking. (She uses other shoes in warm weather.)


AFAICT, Barge cement - which I have used in the past - is just a brand
name for "contact cement" which is available in various brands. I
believe my current bottle is Weldwood brand.

I've used contact cement to repair separated shoe soles in the past; I
think it's what shoe repair shops use, or used to use when there were
shoe repair shops. Contact cement hasn't failed me yet, though the
shoes usually die of some other failure before the contact cement gets a
long-term test.

Shoe Goo also has its purposes, e.g. building up shoe soles on the
bottom when they are worn. I've used it to to "rebuild" worn-down MTB
sole lugs. I'm not surprised people have been disappointed when using
it as a cement.

Bike-specific content: Contact cement was effective at re-attaching rim
tape on sew-ups; perhaps too effective, as I'm not sure removing it for
subsequent patching would have been possible.

Mark J.

  #20  
Old August 26th 19, 10:42 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,610
Default Darn near lost my sole early this morning!

On 8/19/2019 1:42 PM, wrote:
On Monday, August 19, 2019 at 6:11:33 AM UTC-4, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
Very early this morning I put Look Delta cleats onto my Louis Garneau road-bicycling shoes and then went for a ride of just over a kilometer to go to a store and to test the placement of the cleats because I'm going on a long ride later this morning.

Everything was fine until I unclipped my left foot. This is what I found when i looked at the bottom of my shoe because the shoe was making a rather loud clacking noise with every step.

https://flic.kr/p/2h1jKEy

I was NOT a happy bicyclist then.

Fortunately the checkout clerk at the store found a heavy-duty rubber band she then gave me and that I was able to wrap around the shoe. With that I was at least able to ride home.

This is not the first Louis Garneau product that has failed me rather early in its life but it is the last one. I'm done with Louis Garneau stuff. It's not cheap as far as prices go buy it's cheap quality. I was amazed at how little glue was use to attach the some to the rest of the shoe. Right now the show is heavily clamped with two big clamps and a bunch of nylon toe-straps whilst the Gorilla Glue I used to try and reattach the sole to the shoe fully cures which is stated to be in 24 hours. It's a good thing I have a pair of vintage Adidas Eddy Merckx Competition Shoes I was able to put another pair of Look Delta cleats on so I can use those shoes for today's ride.

In my experience and in my honest opinion Louis Garneau quality has plummeted and I've decided that today was the last straw and I'm done with this brand of bicycling gear. My Adidas Eddy Merckx shoes were bought in 1986 and I had the bicycle shop drill them for the Look Delta cleats at the time when I bought them and those shoes are still going strong.

Cheers


I've repaired two pair of stiff-soled shoes with JB weld two-part epoxy. One was a DMX Carbon, and the other was a Northwave Carbon. I got several more years out of both pair.


Unfortunately, this is all too common with glued-on soles. You can try
this: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B007UTZXT2 for a repair that will last
at least a little while.



 




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