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Replacing a lost toolkit



 
 
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  #11  
Old August 17th 19, 07:57 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Posts: 469
Default Replacing a lost toolkit

On Saturday, August 17, 2019 at 3:01:47 AM UTC+2, jbeattie wrote:


Actually, the one weird tool I wish I had once was the pre-load cap tool for a Shimano Hollotech crank when my son got massive chain suck and jammed the chain between the stay and the ring. It was really, really stuck, and I was going to pull the crank. I tried to back out the cap with a screw driver and just munged it up. I eventually got the chain loose, but not without marring the stay.


Did you loosen the pinch bolts first? It is standard procedure for a friend of mine who put a triple crankset on a frame not suitable for that. As a result he drops the chain regurarly between the small ring and bottom bracket and gets really stuck.

Lou
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  #12  
Old August 17th 19, 08:03 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default Replacing a lost toolkit

On Saturday, August 17, 2019 at 1:12:57 AM UTC+2, bob prohaska wrote:
The seat bag toolkit went missing on my bike after 30-odd years.
Unfortunately, I noticed only after getting a flat tire 8 miles
from home. As penance for my inattention I elected to walk, despite
half a dozen offers of help from other riders and one motorist. The
exercise is one I'm not eager to repeat 8-)

Beyond the obvious (tire levers, patch kit and spare tube) what have
folks found worth carrying to fend off routine trouble? My kit
acquired quite a bit more, including a chain tool, spoke wrench and
freewheel tool, along with hex keys. I don't think any of the first
three have ever been useful on the road, but they don't weigh much
and they're far easier to find if they're on the bike. Has anybody
ever had use for them, or other "shop" tools, on the road?

Suggestions for a seat bag would also be welcome. For the moment
I'll put the tools and spares in the pannier baskets, but that's
dangerous as they can be removed and forgotten. Much better to have
necessities permanently living on the bike.

Thanks for reading!

bob prohaska


You will get good advice from everyone here. For me I look what I needed in the past 15 years. The result of that is I only carry two spare tubes, two tire levers and two CO2 catridges. After I cleaned the seatpost I carry the appropriate allen key the first ride after that.

Oh, and I take my phone with me.

Lou
  #13  
Old August 17th 19, 08:12 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Dennis Davis[_2_]
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Posts: 30
Default Replacing a lost toolkit

In article ,
bob prohaska wrote:

....

Suggestions for a seat bag would also be welcome. For the moment
I'll put the tools and spares in the pannier baskets, but that's
dangerous as they can be removed and forgotten. Much better to have
necessities permanently living on the bike.


Not quite what you're asking for, but a tool case that fits in a
bottle cage might be suitable. Something like:

https://www.planetx.co.uk/i/q/BO365S...cage-tool-case

Can be easily switched between bikes. And is *visible* so you can
easily check it's present before setting off for a ride.

Of course giving up a bottle cage might not be acceptable,
especially if you're in a hot climate.
--
Dennis Davis
  #14  
Old August 17th 19, 11:54 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_4_]
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Posts: 1,545
Default Replacing a lost toolkit

wrote:
On Saturday, August 17, 2019 at 1:12:57 AM UTC+2, bob prohaska wrote:
The seat bag toolkit went missing on my bike after 30-odd years.
Unfortunately, I noticed only after getting a flat tire 8 miles
from home. As penance for my inattention I elected to walk, despite
half a dozen offers of help from other riders and one motorist. The
exercise is one I'm not eager to repeat 8-)

Beyond the obvious (tire levers, patch kit and spare tube) what have
folks found worth carrying to fend off routine trouble? My kit
acquired quite a bit more, including a chain tool, spoke wrench and
freewheel tool, along with hex keys. I don't think any of the first
three have ever been useful on the road, but they don't weigh much
and they're far easier to find if they're on the bike. Has anybody
ever had use for them, or other "shop" tools, on the road?

Suggestions for a seat bag would also be welcome. For the moment
I'll put the tools and spares in the pannier baskets, but that's
dangerous as they can be removed and forgotten. Much better to have
necessities permanently living on the bike.

Thanks for reading!

bob prohaska


You will get good advice from everyone here. For me I look what I needed
in the past 15 years. The result of that is I only carry two spare tubes,
two tire levers and two CO2 catridges. After I cleaned the seatpost I
carry the appropriate allen key the first ride after that.

Oh, and I take my phone with me.

Lou


2 tubes, 2 CO2 cartridges, CO2 adapter, two tire levers, crank bros
multitool and a couple latex gloves.

I carry a mini pump but rarely use it. I use plastic Canadian money for
emergency boots.

I have my phone too but haven’t had to call a cab so far.

--
duane
  #15  
Old August 17th 19, 03:30 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 4,185
Default Replacing a lost toolkit

On Friday, August 16, 2019 at 11:57:33 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Saturday, August 17, 2019 at 3:01:47 AM UTC+2, jbeattie wrote:


Actually, the one weird tool I wish I had once was the pre-load cap tool for a Shimano Hollotech crank when my son got massive chain suck and jammed the chain between the stay and the ring. It was really, really stuck, and I was going to pull the crank. I tried to back out the cap with a screw driver and just munged it up. I eventually got the chain loose, but not without marring the stay.


Did you loosen the pinch bolts first? It is standard procedure for a friend of mine who put a triple crankset on a frame not suitable for that. As a result he drops the chain regurarly between the small ring and bottom bracket and gets really stuck.

Lou


Yes. I was surprised that my little screw driver couldn't spin the cap. BTW, another problem with super-small tools is generating 12Nms for bolts like seat clamps and crank pinch bolts, but I've managed to get them tight enough to get home. I changed my saddle angle on a ride the other day, and that bolt has a 16Nm and will shift if not tight. I put a nice welt in my hand with the little pocket tool, and when I got home and used a torque wrench, I was probably at 10Nm with the pocket tool, if that.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #16  
Old August 17th 19, 03:36 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
bob prohaska
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Posts: 67
Default Replacing a lost toolkit

Dennis Davis wrote:
In article ,

Not quite what you're asking for, but a tool case that fits in a
bottle cage might be suitable. Something like:

https://www.planetx.co.uk/i/q/BO365S...cage-tool-case

That's something I hadn't considered.

Can be easily switched between bikes. And is *visible* so you can
easily check it's present before setting off for a ride.


The missing seat bag toolkit was visible too; still baffled how I managed
to not notice its (either) absence or falling off. In the latter case the
racket should have been considerable.

Of course giving up a bottle cage might not be acceptable,
especially if you're in a hot climate.


I am in a hot climate and normally carry a 3 liter camelback in the
pannier baskets. Since that's filled often I have no trouble remembering
to check it. The bottle cage has never been used.

Thanks for posting!

bob prohaska

  #17  
Old August 17th 19, 04:03 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 5,821
Default Replacing a lost toolkit

On 2019-08-16 16:12, bob prohaska wrote:
The seat bag toolkit went missing on my bike after 30-odd years.
Unfortunately, I noticed only after getting a flat tire 8 miles
from home. As penance for my inattention I elected to walk, despite
half a dozen offers of help from other riders and one motorist. The
exercise is one I'm not eager to repeat 8-)

Beyond the obvious (tire levers, patch kit and spare tube) what have
folks found worth carrying to fend off routine trouble? My kit
acquired quite a bit more, including a chain tool, spoke wrench and
freewheel tool, along with hex keys. I don't think any of the first
three have ever been useful on the road, but they don't weigh much
and they're far easier to find if they're on the bike. Has anybody
ever had use for them, or other "shop" tools, on the road?


Mine can be summed up in one word, Crankbrothers M19.

https://www.crankbrothers.com/products/m19

It weighs a bit much for most riders but mine sure has helped a lot or
other riders out of a pickle. Last time was Thursday. Strangely I
haven't needed it for myself yet. The other tools such as wood pieces
and rocks for hammering, nature provides.


Suggestions for a seat bag would also be welcome. For the moment
I'll put the tools and spares in the pannier baskets, but that's
dangerous as they can be removed and forgotten. Much better to have
necessities permanently living on the bike.


Seat bags slosh around too much. I carry the tools in a small "butt
pack" which rides along in the right pannier. That pack also carries my
wallet, keys, phone and stuff. If going into a pub or shop I can whip it
out and strap it around my waist.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #18  
Old August 17th 19, 04:31 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 469
Default Replacing a lost toolkit

On Saturday, August 17, 2019 at 4:30:04 PM UTC+2, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, August 16, 2019 at 11:57:33 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Saturday, August 17, 2019 at 3:01:47 AM UTC+2, jbeattie wrote:


Actually, the one weird tool I wish I had once was the pre-load cap tool for a Shimano Hollotech crank when my son got massive chain suck and jammed the chain between the stay and the ring. It was really, really stuck, and I was going to pull the crank. I tried to back out the cap with a screw driver and just munged it up. I eventually got the chain loose, but not without marring the stay.


Did you loosen the pinch bolts first? It is standard procedure for a friend of mine who put a triple crankset on a frame not suitable for that. As a result he drops the chain regurarly between the small ring and bottom bracket and gets really stuck.

Lou


Yes. I was surprised that my little screw driver couldn't spin the cap. BTW, another problem with super-small tools is generating 12Nms for bolts like seat clamps and crank pinch bolts, but I've managed to get them tight enough to get home. I changed my saddle angle on a ride the other day, and that bolt has a 16Nm and will shift if not tight. I put a nice welt in my hand with the little pocket tool, and when I got home and used a torque wrench, I was probably at 10Nm with the pocket tool, if that.

-- Jay Beattie.


If I carry allen keys than only proper ones instead of those midgets things on a multitool. 4,5 mm get 90% of the jobs done.

Lou
  #19  
Old August 17th 19, 05:00 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
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Posts: 9,263
Default Replacing a lost toolkit

On Saturday, August 17, 2019 at 12:12:57 AM UTC+1, bob prohaska wrote:
The seat bag toolkit went missing on my bike after 30-odd years.
Unfortunately, I noticed only after getting a flat tire 8 miles
from home. As penance for my inattention I elected to walk, despite
half a dozen offers of help from other riders and one motorist. The
exercise is one I'm not eager to repeat 8-)

Beyond the obvious (tire levers, patch kit and spare tube) what have
folks found worth carrying to fend off routine trouble? My kit
acquired quite a bit more, including a chain tool, spoke wrench and
freewheel tool, along with hex keys. I don't think any of the first
three have ever been useful on the road, but they don't weigh much
and they're far easier to find if they're on the bike. Has anybody
ever had use for them, or other "shop" tools, on the road?

Suggestions for a seat bag would also be welcome. For the moment
I'll put the tools and spares in the pannier baskets, but that's
dangerous as they can be removed and forgotten. Much better to have
necessities permanently living on the bike.

Thanks for reading!

bob prohaska


The most useful tool a cyclist can carry is a cellphone loaded with the numbers of taxi firms who have hatchbacks or vans to get his bike home.

The second most useful tool is tyres that don't puncture. I use Schwalbe Big Apples but Schwalbe makes many widths of tyres with protective bands, and so do quite a few other manufacturers.

I carry neither a tube nor a patch kit, though I do carry a mini pump for use on the bikes of pedal pals.

Almost every fitting on my bike has hex socket screws, so I carry a 68gr socket screw kit (it has slide-off ali tube levers, never used). Since everything on my bike has a very restrictive torque rating, I did consider carrying a torque wrench but even the lightest I could find weighed more than all the other tools together, and the truth is the socket wrenches haven't been used in the last ten years or so. I have torque wrenches in my toolbox at home for checking that everything is correctly torqued every few years.

It would be an irritation on my very undulating countryside to be stuck in top gear by a broken gear cable, so I carry a special cyclists' brake spanner by Draper (it's like a brake spanner for motorists but flatter and lighter) to manually change Rohloff gears.

I also carry a proprietary wrench head for undoing the first series Rohloff sprocket retaining nut, because that one is special, unlikely to be found in the toolbox of an LBS anywhere I want to go. It works with a 22mm spanner, which you're damned right I'm not going to carry.

And that's it. The chain comes undone with a quick link (maybe -- I have a tool that I use in my toolbox at home) but the occasion has never arisen on the road to test the theory.

Andre Jute
If you're going to develop something radical, like a zero-service bike which never breaks down, you'd best start from total ignorance so that you aren't misled by the obsolete received wisdom of the thoughtless "wise men", of which there is no shortage in cycling
  #20  
Old August 17th 19, 05:09 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
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Posts: 9,263
Default Replacing a lost toolkit

On Saturday, August 17, 2019 at 4:31:48 PM UTC+1, wrote:
On Saturday, August 17, 2019 at 4:30:04 PM UTC+2, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, August 16, 2019 at 11:57:33 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Saturday, August 17, 2019 at 3:01:47 AM UTC+2, jbeattie wrote:


Actually, the one weird tool I wish I had once was the pre-load cap tool for a Shimano Hollotech crank when my son got massive chain suck and jammed the chain between the stay and the ring. It was really, really stuck, and I was going to pull the crank. I tried to back out the cap with a screw driver and just munged it up. I eventually got the chain loose, but not without marring the stay.

Did you loosen the pinch bolts first? It is standard procedure for a friend of mine who put a triple crankset on a frame not suitable for that. As a result he drops the chain regurarly between the small ring and bottom bracket and gets really stuck.

Lou


Yes. I was surprised that my little screw driver couldn't spin the cap. BTW, another problem with super-small tools is generating 12Nms for bolts like seat clamps and crank pinch bolts, but I've managed to get them tight enough to get home. I changed my saddle angle on a ride the other day, and that bolt has a 16Nm and will shift if not tight. I put a nice welt in my hand with the little pocket tool, and when I got home and used a torque wrench, I was probably at 10Nm with the pocket tool, if that.

-- Jay Beattie.


If I carry allen keys than only proper ones instead of those midgets things on a multitool. 4,5 mm get 90% of the jobs done.

Lou


At least the multitool where the small socket tools are all attached to the backbone can't get lost like my handle-and-tiny-interchangeble-bits thingy.. A fellow on a touring forum saw a discussion of my tools and said he would take it on his world tour. I was forced to tell him that he'd lose the bits before he was out of France, that such a poncey little toolkit is only good for someone who never goes further than a 60m from home.

I don't like the backbone things anyway, because I find them awkard to handle, all the tools not in use trying to scratch my bike.

Andre Jute
Compromise isn't ideal
 




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