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Belgium/Netherlands touring bikes



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 28th 03, 05:55 PM
Art Winterbauer
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Default Belgium/Netherlands touring bikes

When I visited Belgium and the Netherlands this summer, I noticed a number of old-fashioned touring bikes. The ones I
saw looked like pre-WW2 style bikes with full fenders with lights mounted on them, spring seats, and easy-to-reach
handlebars (upright style).

A Belgian friend said she thinks they are still being made, but didn't know brand names or sources for them in the U.S.

Does anyone have info on where such bikes could be purchased in the U.S.? I live in Colorado.

Thanks!

--Art
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  #2  
Old July 28th 03, 11:26 PM
Doug Purdy
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Default Belgium/Netherlands touring bikes

Look at the hybrids in a few bike stores. Some even have the mid fork
lowrider brazeons.

But I never did understand how and old fashioned configuration got called
"hybrid," as being part road, part mtb. Seems to me the "hybrid" came first.

Belgium and the Netherlands have some neat handlebars on some of their
hybrids. These bars look more comfy than straight or riser bars and they're
called "butterfly bars" among other things. To see them surf to

http://www.bikemotion.nl/outside.php?id=6

look at the "Ixion" and "Argeon"

Doug
Toronto

"Art Winterbauer" wrote in message
...
When I visited Belgium and the Netherlands this summer, I noticed a number

of old-fashioned touring bikes. The ones I
saw looked like pre-WW2 style bikes with full fenders with lights mounted

on them, spring seats, and easy-to-reach
handlebars (upright style).

A Belgian friend said she thinks they are still being made, but didn't

know brand names or sources for them in the U.S.

Does anyone have info on where such bikes could be purchased in the U.S.?

I live in Colorado.

Thanks!

--Art



  #3  
Old July 29th 03, 01:35 PM
Art Winterbauer
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Posts: n/a
Default Belgium/Netherlands touring bikes

Thanks, Doug. (Now I wish I spoke Dutch)



Doug Purdy wrote:

Look at the hybrids in a few bike stores. Some even have the mid fork
lowrider brazeons.

But I never did understand how and old fashioned configuration got called
"hybrid," as being part road, part mtb. Seems to me the "hybrid" came first.

Belgium and the Netherlands have some neat handlebars on some of their
hybrids. These bars look more comfy than straight or riser bars and they're
called "butterfly bars" among other things. To see them surf to

http://www.bikemotion.nl/outside.php?id=6

look at the "Ixion" and "Argeon"

Doug
Toronto

"Art Winterbauer" wrote in message
...
When I visited Belgium and the Netherlands this summer, I noticed a number

of old-fashioned touring bikes. The ones I
saw looked like pre-WW2 style bikes with full fenders with lights mounted

on them, spring seats, and easy-to-reach
handlebars (upright style).

A Belgian friend said she thinks they are still being made, but didn't

know brand names or sources for them in the U.S.

Does anyone have info on where such bikes could be purchased in the U.S.?

I live in Colorado.

Thanks!

--Art

  #4  
Old July 30th 03, 10:46 PM
Yannik
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Default Belgium/Netherlands touring bikes

On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 10:55:04 -0600, Art Winterbauer
wrote:

When I visited Belgium and the Netherlands this summer, I noticed a number of old-fashioned touring bikes. The ones I
saw looked like pre-WW2 style bikes with full fenders with lights mounted on them, spring seats, and easy-to-reach
handlebars (upright style).

A Belgian friend said she thinks they are still being made, but didn't know brand names or sources for them in the U.S.

Does anyone have info on where such bikes could be purchased in the U.S.? I live in Colorado.

Thanks!

--Art



http://www.utopia-fahrrad.de/
http://www.gazelle.nl
http://www.batavus.nl
http://www.pashley.co.uk/ (Classics : High Head Roadster)
http://www.sparta.nl/ (granny)

but i got no idea where you can buy them in the us

Yannik
  #5  
Old July 31st 03, 07:50 PM
Luigi de Guzman
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Default Belgium/Netherlands touring bikes

Ryan Cousineau wrote in message of pain
in Tartarus, bound to a spinning, flaming wheel.

Not exactly what I'd like in the way of a cycling experience.

-Luigi
in nova fert anima


And you call yourself a Catholic? The tradition of mortification of the
flesh is a long and honourable one.


Mortification is one thing. Damnation, entirely another....

-Luigi
  #6  
Old August 3rd 03, 06:32 AM
smokey
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Default Belgium/Netherlands touring bikes

Art Winterbauer wrote in message ...
When I visited Belgium and the Netherlands this summer, I noticed a number of old-fashioned touring bikes. The ones I
saw looked like pre-WW2 style bikes with full fenders with lights mounted on them, spring seats, and easy-to-reach
handlebars (upright style).

A Belgian friend said she thinks they are still being made, but didn't know brand names or sources for them in the U.S.

Does anyone have info on where such bikes could be purchased in the U.S.? I live in Colorado.

Thanks!

--Art


i modified our burley tandem by installing a pair of rivendell
albatross handlebars on it. they offer the same upright position as
many of the european city bikes. both sets are also equipped with
their cork grips (very comfortable!). it involved cable changes, but
was well worth it for the added comfort it gives my wife. we don't do
long rides, usually 15-25 miles and don't push the pace. on my road
bike, which gets ridden harder and longer, i use rivendell noodle
bars. they are a drop bar with a very shallow ramp and a top portion
that sweeps slightly back towards the rider. IMHO, many of the new
road bikes on the market come with way too radical a riding position.
handlebars that are within an inch (or less) of the top of the seat
will be more comfortable for most riders. it also makes it a lot
easier to use the drops for extended periods, which helps
aerodynamics.
smokey
  #8  
Old August 3rd 03, 10:01 PM
Eric S. Sande
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Default Belgium/Netherlands touring bikes

Reflecting my new racing category, of course,

Now you are going to have to learn guile and decption, Ryan.

It's a shame, you were such a promising young rider.

--

_______________________ALL AMIGA IN MY MIND_______________________
------------------"Buddy Holly, the Texas Elvis"------------------
in.edu__________
  #9  
Old August 4th 03, 08:24 AM
Ryan Cousineau
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Posts: n/a
Default Belgium/Netherlands touring bikes

In article ,
"Eric S. Sande" wrote:

Reflecting my new racing category, of course,


Now you are going to have to learn guile and decption, Ryan.

It's a shame, you were such a promising young rider.


I'm already learning. For the first time last week, I finished with the
Cat 5 lead pack. Next goal is to actually win.

This weekend: Masters TTT. Not much opportunity for guile there; I'm
told it's bad etiquette to attempt a break against your teammates .

--
Ryan Cousineau, http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine
President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
 




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