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protecting saddle + post from theft?



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 4th 03, 10:14 AM
Sanjay Punjab
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Default protecting saddle + post from theft?

I recently had my saddle and seat post stolen off my bike. I had allen
screws securing both, not quick release levers. Is there a way to
secure the saddle and seat post better to a bike?
Locking the saddle frame to the triangle of the bike frame could
atleast help protect the saddle, but a relatively thin cable lock can
be cut easily.
I am looking for some effective ideas to secure both.
Thanks
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  #2  
Old August 4th 03, 04:23 PM
Hunrobe
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Default protecting saddle + post from theft?

(Steve McDonald)

wrote:

I leave my quick-release seat lever flipped in the loose position,
then screw it down tight. Then I take a hammer and make it even
tighter. This also works on quck-release wheel hubs. This way the
bandits see the quick-release and think they've got an easy mark. They
can't get it off without hitting it with something, the same way I put
it on. This would make a lot of noise and commotion, even if their
drug-numbed brains could figure it out and I've never lost a seat or a
wheel.

Steve McDonald


Doesn't this method not only at least cosmetically damage your bike but also
negate the whole purpose of QRs? If it works for you that's cool but I'd rather
not start pounding on my QR levers with a hammer. No offense intended but it
sounds kind of dumb, actually. I've never lost a wheel or a saddle either and
all I do is only lock my bikes where I can keep an eye on them. Failing that, I
simply use the QRs as designed and take the parts with me.

Regards,
Bob Hunt

P.S.- What do you do when you get a flat and there aren't any hammers or rocks
handy?
  #3  
Old August 4th 03, 06:54 PM
Thunder9
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Default protecting saddle + post from theft?

On 04 Aug 2003 07:33:34 -0700, Sam Huffman
wrote:

(Sanjay Punjab) writes:

I recently had my saddle and seat post stolen off my bike. I had allen
screws securing both, not quick release levers. Is there a way to
secure the saddle and seat post better to a bike?
Locking the saddle frame to the triangle of the bike frame could
atleast help protect the saddle, but a relatively thin cable lock can
be cut easily.
I am looking for some effective ideas to secure both.


There are cables that you can use to "secure" the seat. Basically they loop
around the mechanism bolting the seat to the post, and around the frame.

This requires that the seat be removed from the post before removing the post
from the bicycle. Or, alternatively, the thief could use a wire-cutters. I'd
imagine using one is somewhat more effective than not using one, and my seat
made it through two years on a college campus without being stolen. That is,
until I made the mistake of locking my bicycle to a tree.

Sam


What does locking a bike to a tree have to do with stealing a seat?

Is seat stealing a common occurance? Does that happen more often than
bike stealing (ie seat stealing only vs. complete bike stealing)?

I think one could go a bit overboard trying to secure things on a
bike. Perhaps the best deterrent would be to make the seat *look*
like it isn't worth stealing.

Regards,
Thunder9

  #5  
Old August 4th 03, 09:03 PM
Gary Young
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Default protecting saddle + post from theft?

(Sanjay Punjab) wrote in message . com...
I recently had my saddle and seat post stolen off my bike. I had allen
screws securing both, not quick release levers. Is there a way to
secure the saddle and seat post better to a bike?
Locking the saddle frame to the triangle of the bike frame could
atleast help protect the saddle, but a relatively thin cable lock can
be cut easily.
I am looking for some effective ideas to secure both.
Thanks


Both Kryptonite and Pitlock (
www.pitlock.com) make locking seattube
skewers. That won't prevent your saddle from being stolen off of the
post. When that happened to me, I switched to a two-bolt seatpost (the
more you can slow thieves down the better) and use wax or silicon to
close the hex holes. Here in NYC, no one trusts the thin cables you're
referring to. The popular thing to do is take a length of chain
(drivetrain chain), cover it with a length of inner tube, run it
through the seatstays and the saddle rails and then close the loop
with a chain tool.
  #6  
Old August 5th 03, 01:20 AM
Steve McDonald
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Default protecting saddle + post from theft?


Steve McDonald wrote:

I leave my quick-release seat lever flipped in the loose position,
then screw it down tight. Then I take a hammer and make it even tighter.
This also works on quick-release wheel hubs. This way the bandits see
the quick-release and think they've got an easy mark. They can't get it
off without hitting it with something, the same way I put it on. This
would make a lot of noise and commotion, even if their drug-numbed
brains could figure it out and I've never lost a seat or a wheel.
-------------------------------------------------------------

Bob Hunt replied:

Doesn't this method not only at least cosmetically damage your bike
but also negate the whole purpose of QRs? If it works for you that's
cool but I'd rather not start pounding on my QR levers with a hammer. No
offense intended but it sounds kind of dumb, actually. I've never lost a
wheel or a saddle either and all I do is only lock my bikes where I can
keep an eye on them. Failing that, I simply use the QRs as designed and
take the parts with me.

P.S.- What do you do when you get a flat and there aren't any hammers or
rocks handy?
----------------------------------------------------------------

I'm very careful how I hit the levers with a small balpine hammer I
carry in my tool kit and don't damage them. I use thorn-resistant tubes
and have had only 1 flat in five years. I've broken no spokes in that
time and only have to loosen the quick-release skewers every year and a
half to mount new tires and to grease and adjust the bearings. I do
video work and eschew the use of
"quick-release" tripod heads for camcorders. This term translates as
"instant-disaster" to me, regarding expensive video gear. No, I don't
hit my cameras with hammers (unless they've really asked for it). I
always choose better security over a little convenience.

Taking the seat with you when locking the bike outdoors is a good
idea and many people do it. I always take off my front and rear lights
and lock them in my hard case behind the seat.

Steve McDonald

  #8  
Old August 5th 03, 07:51 AM
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Default protecting saddle + post from theft?


"Sanjay Punjab" wrote in message
om...
I recently had my saddle and seat post stolen off my bike. I had allen
screws securing both, not quick release levers. Is there a way to
secure the saddle and seat post better to a bike?
Locking the saddle frame to the triangle of the bike frame could
atleast help protect the saddle, but a relatively thin cable lock can
be cut easily.
I am looking for some effective ideas to secure both.
Thanks


If you can get the seat adjusted to a height you're happy with, you could
weld it in place, or drill a hole through the post, bolt it in place, and
mess up the threads so it couldn't be undone without a hacksaw.


  #9  
Old August 5th 03, 03:30 PM
ant
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Default protecting saddle + post from theft?

wrote in message news:6uIXa.2166
If you can get the seat adjusted to a height you're happy with, you could
weld it in place, or drill a hole through the post, bolt it in place, and
mess up the threads so it couldn't be undone without a hacksaw.


if your bike wasnt stupid light, a rivet or two would look a lot
cleaner than a bolt, and would be more secure. you could always drill
them out later. or for a beater-glue. you could just fill fastener
heads with epoxy. use a punch (to break otu the epoxy) or a
screw-extractor to remove later. or- perhaps even filling the fastener
with something temporary like wax might work. stop a thief inserting
an allen key without a whole lot of fussing about.

thoughts,

anthony
  #10  
Old August 5th 03, 03:33 PM
beaver charlie
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Default protecting saddle + post from theft?

Ahhh, only in America...

Who else would spend $4,000 fretting away every milligram of bicycle
weight, only to load it down with 50 lbs of anchor chain to keep it
from being stolen!
 




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