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How to identify this older Peugeot road bike?



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 9th 03, 05:11 PM
Rick Onanian
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Default How to identify this older Peugeot road bike?


How can I identify this bike? I rescued it out of somebody's trash on
garbage day, and it appears to be a pretty nice road bike (I was expecting
a dime-a-dozen 1980s 10-speed).

I can take detailed pictures with my digital camera if anybody thinks it
would help.

Keeping in mind that some components have probably been changed, here's
everything I can list about it:

"Peugeot" in blue letters over dark grey dithered fading-towards-rear
checker-patterned boxes on top tube
Dull silver or metallic grey general paint color
Chrome-plated/polished fork
"Super Vitus 980" "Special Double Butted" tubing
Major tubing joints have reinforcement metal on them, looks almost like the
sort of tubing connector where you slide all involved tubes into it; but it
is obiously only a reinforcement due to it's thin gauge.
Mavic Module E2 rim on rear
Rigida 7000 rim on front, slightly wider; I suspect this rim was original
equipment for both
Peugeot Helico Matic rear hub, no label on front hub Mostly Peugeot
components (drivetrain, brakes)
Quick-release hubs
"Laprade" seatpost which appears to be cast-aluminum
Selle Italia RS saddle
Large chainring has very fine logo printed, may say "Strongught" or
something similar
(I just looked with a magnifying glass, looks like "Stronglight")
Downtube shifters; they have "S" stamped on face near the end
"Mafac" stamped on brake levers (single-type/aero levers)
1926363, PF60, and 56 printed on a label on the underside of the bottom
bracket
3 chainring, 5 cog
Large round reflectors on front and back
Found with old 700c x 25 x 90psi Michelins
threaded-style stem
Brakes each have a single cable that ends in a bracket which then has a
seperate short cable whose ends attach to each side of brake (is this a
"double pull" brake?)

Thank you,
Rick Onanian
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  #2  
Old July 9th 03, 06:16 PM
Ken
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Posts: n/a
Default How to identify this older Peugeot road bike?

Rick Onanian wrote in
news
1926363, PF60, and 56 printed on a label on the underside of the bottom
bracket


PF60 could be the model number. It doesn't sound familiar, but Peugeot used
model numbers like that (the PX and UO series were pretty common). Don't know
what year.
  #3  
Old July 11th 03, 03:45 AM
mark
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Posts: n/a
Default How to identify this older Peugeot road bike?


"Rick Onanian" wrote in message
news

How can I identify this bike? I rescued it out of somebody's trash on
garbage day, and it appears to be a pretty nice road bike (I was expecting
a dime-a-dozen 1980s 10-speed).

I can take detailed pictures with my digital camera if anybody thinks it
would help.

Keeping in mind that some components have probably been changed, here's
everything I can list about it:

"Peugeot" in blue letters over dark grey dithered fading-towards-rear
checker-patterned boxes on top tube
Dull silver or metallic grey general paint color
Chrome-plated/polished fork
"Super Vitus 980" "Special Double Butted" tubing
Major tubing joints have reinforcement metal on them, looks almost like

the
sort of tubing connector where you slide all involved tubes into it; but

it
is obiously only a reinforcement due to it's thin gauge.


Sounds like a lugged frame, which would be the case with the good quality
frame tubing. Yes, this probably is the "sort of tubing connector..." you
described, with the tubes being brazed into the lugs by hand.


Mavic Module E2 rim on rear
Rigida 7000 rim on front, slightly wider; I suspect this rim was original
equipment for both
Peugeot Helico Matic rear hub, no label on front hub Mostly Peugeot
components (drivetrain, brakes)
Quick-release hubs
"Laprade" seatpost which appears to be cast-aluminum
Selle Italia RS saddle
Large chainring has very fine logo printed, may say "Strongught" or
something similar
(I just looked with a magnifying glass, looks like "Stronglight")


Stronglight is a very well known French component maker, still doing
business in Europe. Good but not great components, Peugeot put a lot of
Stronglight stuff on their higher priced offerings.

Downtube shifters; they have "S" stamped on face near the end


Simplex? French company known for truly wretched plastic derailleurs,
although some of their downtube shifters were highly regarded. Original
equipment on lots of Peugeots.

"Mafac" stamped on brake levers (single-type/aero levers)
1926363, PF60, and 56 printed on a label on the underside of the bottom
bracket


56 cm seat tube?
3 chainring, 5 cog


By the early to mid '80s, just about every decent bike had 6 cogs in back.


Large round reflectors on front and back


Required on bikes sold in US

Found with old 700c x 25 x 90psi Michelins
threaded-style stem
Brakes each have a single cable that ends in a bracket which then has a
seperate short cable whose ends attach to each side of brake (is this a
"double pull" brake?)


This sounds like a "center-pull" brake, probably made by Mafac like the
brake levers. Unbelievably noisy.


--
mark


  #4  
Old July 11th 03, 01:01 PM
Rick Onanian
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Posts: n/a
Default How to identify this older Peugeot road bike?

On Fri, 11 Jul 2003 02:45:31 GMT, mark
wrote:
Major tubing joints have reinforcement metal on them, looks almost like
sort of tubing connector where you slide all involved tubes into it; but
is obiously only a reinforcement due to it's thin gauge.


Sounds like a lugged frame, which would be the case with the good quality
frame tubing. Yes, this probably is the "sort of tubing connector..." you
described, with the tubes being brazed into the lugs by hand.


I looked up "lugged" and agree, based on the description found at
http://www.winternet.com/~rtandems/const.html
of lugged frames.

Downtube shifters; they have "S" stamped on face near the end


Simplex? French company known for truly wretched plastic derailleurs,
although some of their downtube shifters were highly regarded. Original
equipment on lots of Peugeots.


Confirmed, the "S" on them is the Simplex logo with a little line through
it. These shifters are not plastic (that would be terrible!).

1926363, PF60, and 56 printed on a label on the underside of the bottom
bracket


56 cm seat tube?


Hmm...Measured from inside of joint @ BB to inside of joint at top tube,
52cm.

3 chainring, 5 cog


By the early to mid '80s, just about every decent bike had 6 cogs in
back.


That helps, probably from 70s then.

Brakes each have a single cable that ends in a bracket which then has a
seperate short cable whose ends attach to each side of brake (is this a
"double pull" brake?)


This sounds like a "center-pull" brake, probably made by Mafac like the
brake levers. Unbelievably noisy.


Indeed, like this:
http://images.google.com/images?q=tb...phui-8C:www.c-
able.ne.jp/~toru35/raleigh/centerpull.jpg

but not like this:
http://images.google.com/images?q=tb...centerpull.gif

How is the difference expressed between those two types, both apparently
called center pull? Center pull canti vs. center pull V?

Additional info:
Atax Stem
"Atax" "Franco Italia D352" (both stamped on left side near center)
"Guidons Philippe" (stamped on right near center) drop handlebars
Spidel Mallard QR skewers

Thank you,
Rick
  #5  
Old July 11th 03, 02:46 PM
Buck
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Posts: n/a
Default How to identify this older Peugeot road bike?

"Rick Onanian" wrote in message
news
56 cm seat tube?


Hmm...Measured from inside of joint @ BB to inside of joint at top tube,
52cm.


Measurements of seat tube length are usually performed from the center of
the BB to either the top of the seat tube or the center of the top tube
where it meets the seat tube.
http://www.coloradocyclist.com/BikeF...dimensions.cfm

This sounds like a "center-pull" brake, probably made by Mafac like the
brake levers. Unbelievably noisy.


Indeed, like this:
http://images.google.com/images?q=tb...phui-8C:www.c-
able.ne.jp/~toru35/raleigh/centerpull.jpg

but not like this:

http://images.google.com/images?q=tb...in.com/graphic
s/centerpull.gif

How is the difference expressed between those two types, both apparently
called center pull? Center pull canti vs. center pull V?


Simple. Cantilever brakes (your second image) are called cantilever brakes
or cantis. Center-pulls are center-pulls. Whoever posted the second image
called cantis centerpulls erroneously. Also, "V" brakes are a different
entity all together. They mount on the same brake bosses as cantis, but use
a linear-pull mechanism (thus their also being called linear pull brakes).
Here's picture for you: http://bicycleaustin.info/graphics/vbrakes.jpg

By the way, if you read the website where those images came from, you will
see some advice on brakes that is also suspect. While V-brakes are well
known for their stopping power, they are not necessarily the best solution.
Their website states that side-pull brakes are lower quality and aren't used
much any more. This is true for mountain bikes, but not true for road bikes.
The side-pulls on my road bike are every bit as powerful as the v-brakes on
my mountain bike.

-Buck


  #6  
Old July 11th 03, 03:33 PM
mark
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Posts: n/a
Default How to identify this older Peugeot road bike?


"Rick Onanian" t wrote
Additional info:
Atax Stem
"Atax" "Franco Italia D352" (both stamped on left side near center)
"Guidons Philippe" (stamped on right near center) drop handlebars
Spidel Mallard QR skewers

Thank you,
Rick


My '78 or '79 PX-10 had identical markings on the handlebars (this was
Peugeot's entry-level racing bike in the '60s and '70s), and Maillard hubs
and freewheel. Your bike sounds like one of Peugeot's higher quality touring
bikes of the period (hence the triple chainring), with high quality frame
tubing, and good to average components.
--
mark


  #7  
Old July 11th 03, 08:57 PM
Buck
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Posts: n/a
Default How to identify this older Peugeot road bike? OR Identifying brake types

"Rick Onanian" wrote in message
news
In the picture

http://images.google.com/images?q=tb...in.com/graphic
s/centerpull.gif
(the second picture I posted)
these look on to be similar construction to V brakes, which is why I
thought they were just a different type of V's. So, that picture is of
"cantis", and the first picture (as on the Peugeot) are "center pulls",

and
my Giant has "side-pulls" (and of course, my MTB has V's).

Summary (correct me if I'm wrong):
Cantis and V's mount one piece to each side of the
wheel and are pulled by the cable inward
Center pulls and side pulls mount to a single bolt centered
above the wheel and both sides pivot on that bolt
Cantis and center-pulls share similar cable-operations
where a cable between the two sides is pulled in
it's center by the brake lever's cable
V's and side-pulls each have their own cable operation/movement.


Looks like you have it straight. You might also like to see Sheldon's primer
on cantilever brakes (as well as v-brakes):
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/cantilever-geometry.html

-Buck


 




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